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GS-0300

 

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Page updated 11/12/2016

This group includes all classes of positions the duties of which are to administer, supervise, or perform work involved in management analysis; stenography, typing, correspondence, and secretarial work; mail and file work; the operation of office appliances; the operation of communications equipment, use of codes and ciphers, and procurement of the most efficient communications services; the operation of microform equipment, peripheral equipment, duplicating equipment, mail processing equipment, and copier/duplicating equipment; and other work of a general clerical and administrative nature

There were 318,752 federal workers employed in this group in 2014 within all Executive Branch departments, and large and small independent agencies including the Merit System Protection Board (18), NASA (2,416), the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (773), and the Office of Government Ethics (37).

The largest employers of this group are the Department of Navy, Army, and Air Force which employs over 120,000 civilians, DHS (28,601) and the VA with 33,648. All of the cabinet level agencies employ large numbers of workers in the GS-0300 group with  95,726 in the GS-0301 miscellaneous administration and program series, 55,136 in the GS-0303 miscellaneous clerk and assistant position, over 18,000 in logistics management GS-0346, and 62,308 in the GS-0343 management and program analyst series.

Don't overlook any agency in your job search as there are positions available in all agencies.  For example the Commission of Fine Art, a small agency with less than 100 workers, employs 2 from this group.

The following information is compiled from numerous federal documents including qualification standards, job announcements, career articles, occupation flysheets, FEDSCOPE, OPM, Agency websites, interviews with federal employees, The United States Government Manual, and from the Department of Labor's Occupational Outlook Handbook.

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Job Series Definitions

These position descriptions are excerpted from the qualification standards for select job titles in this group. In the General Schedule position classification system is established under chapter 51 of title 5, United States Code. The term “General Schedule” or “GS” denotes the major position classification system and pay structure for white collar work in the Federal government. Agencies that are no longer subject to chapter 51 have replaced the GS pay plan indicator with agency-unique pay plan indicators. For example, the Bureau of Prisons uses GL instead of the GS designation and the FAA uses the FG designation prefix. For this reason, reference to General Schedule or GS is often omitted from the individual qualification standard sheets.

A brief introduction for major occupations within this group is provided below.

 

Miscellaneous Administration and Program Series, GS-0301

 

This series includes positions the duties of which are to perform, supervise, or manage nonprofessional, two-grade interval work for which no other series is appropriate. The work requires analytical ability, judgment, discretion, and knowledge of a substantial body of administrative or program principles, concepts, policies, and objectives.

The federal government employs 99,016 in this occupation of which 3,202 work overseas. The Department of Homeland Security is the largest employer with 16,001 employed followed by the Department of the Army with 16,995 civilians and the Department of the Air Force with 8,662. The VA also employs 7,429 in this group. All cabinet level, large and most small agencies employ workers in this occupation.

Hydrologists & Planning & Environmental Coordinators | BLM (Part 3)

Michael Hildner was interviewed for an article on our federal jobs blog titled Hydrologists & Planning & Environmental Coordinators | BLM (Part 3). Hildner, is a GS-301-12 planning and environmental coordinator located in the BLM Washington D.C. Office.
Hildner wanted to help manage public lands on behalf of the American people. He strives to ensure, “the best balance of uses and resource protections for America’s public lands. The BLM undertakes extensive land use planning through a collaborative approach with local, state, and tribal governments, the public, user groups and industry. The result is a set of land use plans – called Resource Management Plans (RMP) – that provide the framework to guide decisions for every action and approved use on over 245 million acres of surface land and 700 million acres of subsurface minerals.”
Hildner explains, “The BLM prepares RMPs for areas of public lands, called planning areas, which tend to have similar resource characteristics. RMPs are used to allocate resources and determine appropriate multiple uses for the public lands, develop a strategy to manage and protect resources; and establish systems to monitor and evaluate status of resources and effectiveness of management practices over time.”
Hildner comments that, “education requirements vary, however a background in science, and experience in leadership positions with effective communication skills will serve you well. Experience in leading teams of resource specialists in preparing land use plans for BLM resource areas is essential. Teams represent the full range of BLM programs such as range, forestry, minerals, lands, wildlife, hydrology, archeology, and recreation”.

Work that is classified in a two-grade interval pattern up through GS-11 (i.e., GS-5, 7, 9, and 11) which has not been designated as professional in a series definition is generally referred to as administrative. Administrative work (and here the term administrative is used broadly to refer to positions on both the program or mission and the administrative or management services side of an organization) requires knowledge of the principles, concepts, policies, and objectives applicable to a program or administrative area. Although administrative work may not require education in specialized fields, it does involve skills (e.g., analytical, research, writing, and judgment) typically demonstrated by substantial, responsible experience the equivalent of a college level education.

Positions classified in the Miscellaneous Administration and Program Series, GS-0301, involve specialized work for which no appropriate occupational series has been established. Typically, positions in this series are too few of a kind to have been recognized as separate lines of work. Some positions involve new or emerging work or, more rarely, mixtures of work that cannot be identified with an established series.

Job Series Titles: (Click on the job title to view job vacancies for government and private sector jobs.) The USAJOBS selection lists all federal job vacancies for this job series.

USAJOBS GS-0301

 

Messenger GS-0302

Messengers supervise or perform general messenger work, such as receiving, delivering, and collecting incoming and outgoing mail or other documents or items, including correspondence, memoranda, publications, records, files, packages, and other similar material. Positions in this series may also involve the performance of light manual or mechanical work, or general office tasks of a simple and routine nature, or the operation of a motor vehicle.

The federal government employs 15 messengers. All work for major cabinet level agencies. 

Included in this series are positions which are primarily concerned with the receipt, individual-route sorting, collection or pickup, and delivery of mail (insured, registered, air mail, etc.) and a variety of other papers, documents, and administrative material processed or handled in the mail unit or messenger room.

 Messenger positions may also include the performance, as required, of miscellaneous tasks such as operating simple duplicating equipment in an office situation; light manual work such as lifting and emptying mail sacks, delivering or collecting administrative material and packages, moving office machines and equipment, etc.; simple office duties such as checking outgoing material for complete address, noting changes on messenger route, filing alphabetically, date-stamping material, etc., or the operation of automotive equipment to facilitate the performance of messenger work.

Job Series Titles: (Click on the job title to view job vacancies for government and private sector jobs.) The USAJOBS selection lists all federal job vacancies for this job series.

USAJOBS GS-0302

 

Miscellaneous Clerk and Assistant Series, GS-0303

 

This series includes positions the duties of which are to perform or supervise clerical, assistant, or technician work for which no other series is appropriate. The work requires a knowledge of the procedures and technique involved in carrying out the work of an organization and involves application of procedures and practices within the framework of established guidelines.

The federal government employs 59,819 in this occupation of which1,340 work overseas. The VA is the largest employer with 11,426, followed by the Department of the Army with 10,340 civilians and the Department of Commerce with 9,006. All cabinet level and many large agencies employ this occupation.

Work that is classified in a one-grade interval pattern (GS-1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, and up) is generally referred to as clerk, assistant, or Technician work.

Clerical work involves the processing or maintenance of records or documents which represent the transactions or business of an organization.

Assistant or technician work requires knowledge of the methods and procedures that are part of, or subordinate to, an administrative or program area. These workers carry out specific procedures and use established methods. They apply practical knowledge of regulations and precedent cases. Problems and issues that do not fit within the scope of established guidelines are usually referred to administrative or program specialists for resolution.

The duties of assistants and technicians overlap those of trainees in administrative or program fields. In such cases, the purpose of the assignment and the career ladder must be considered. For administrative or program specialist trainees, such assignments are a temporary stage in their development to do work of a more judgmental and analytical nature.

Job Series Titles: (Click on the job title to view job vacancies for government and private sector jobs.) The USAJOBS selection lists all federal job vacancies for this job series.

USAJOBS GS-0303

 

Information Receptionist GS-0304 

This series includes all classes of positions the duties of that are to supervise or perform work involved in receiving and directing persons who call or visit Government agencies, installations, or offices, and giving them information in person or by telephone concerning the organization, functions, activities and personnel of such agencies, installations or offices.

The federal government employs 484 information receptionists. The VA is the largest employer with 153, followed by the Department of Agriculture with 105 and the Department of Justice with 61. Health and Human Services employs 12 and the Interior Department employs 13.

Information receptionists are usually physically located at primary points of contact in or in access to Government buildings, offices, or installations (e.g., main public entrances, public information offices, etc.), where there is a demonstrated need to provide information, to give directions, to regulate visitor traffic, to facilitate security control procedures, to conserve staff time of technical personnel, or for a combination of these and other purposes.

Information receptionists are primarily responsible for giving information, usually in person but also frequently over the telephone, in response to inquiries concerning the identification, location and general responsibilities of organizations, functions, programs, activities, operations and personnel of agencies, installations and offices, and similar questions. The work sometimes

Job Series Titles: (Click on the job title to view job vacancies for government and private sector jobs.) The USAJOBS selection lists all federal job vacancies for this job series.

USAJOBS GS-0304

 

Mail and File GS-0305

Mail and file clerks are involved in the administration, supervision or performance of clerical work related to the processing of incoming or outgoing mail and/or the systematic arrangement of records for storage or reference purposes the scheduled disposition of records, and the performance of related work when such duties require the application of established mail or file methods and procedures, knowledge of prescribed systems for governing the flow and control of communications, and/or the filing or storage and retrieval of records, and knowledge of the organization and functions of the operating unit or units serviced.

The federal government employs 4726 mail and file clerks of which 48 work overseas. The Department of the Treasury is the largest employer with 1,751 followed by the Veterans Administration with 1,458, the Department of the Army with 383, the Department of the Navy employs 214, and Social Security employs 154.  Most cabinet level agencies employ some workers in this series.

Mail work and file work both include a wide variety of processing operations that may be segregated or combined in many different ways to constitute mail or file positions. Typically, both mail and file work consist principally of manually-performed operations. In many manual systems various mechanical devices are used to facilitate the handling and processing operations. These include such items of desk top equipment as date stampers, automatic envelope opening machines, automatic envelope sealing machines, copying machines, addressing machines, folding (and inserting) machines, and freestanding equipment such as mechanic files, etc.

More recently, automated filing systems have been developed. For example, automated systems records are stored on microfilm or microfiche and located and retrieved by means of automatic searching by a scanning unit that is controlled by a coded punch card. In those systems some new terminology is used and some changes have occurred in the methods applied in filing (or storing) records and in searching for (or retrieving) information from records.

Neither the mechanical devices nor the operations performed in automated systems have affected the basic nature of mail or file work. The use of an automated system involves a rearrangement of, but no change in, basic filing processes. For this reason, this standard, that depicts mail and file work in terms of the processes involved in manual filing systems, is appropriate for the evaluation of positions concerned with automated or mechanical operations.

Job Series Titles: (Click on the job title to view job vacancies for government and private sector jobs.) The USAJOBS selection lists all federal job vacancies for this job series.

USAJOBS GS-0305

 

Secretary Series, GS-0318

This series includes all positions the duties of which are to assist one individual, and in some cases the subordinate staff of that individual, by performing general office work auxiliary to the work of the organization. To be included in this series, a position must be the principal office clerical or administrative support position in the office, operating independently of any other such position in the office. The duties require a knowledge of clerical and administrative procedures and requirements; various office skills; and the ability to apply such skills in a way that increases the effectiveness of others.

The federal government employs 16,364 secretaries of which 384 work overseas. The Department of the Air Force is the largest employer with 2,754 civilians followed by the Department of the Army with 2,213 and 2,169 with the Veterans Administration. All cabinet level and large agencies employ secretaries.

Positions in this series exist for the purpose of increasing the effectiveness of others by performing as many office support duties as possible. This includes serving as the principal clerical and administrative support position in the immediate organizational unit in or for which the persons assisted have responsibility, by carrying out and coordinating all the clerical and day-to-day administrative support activities which are typically required to accomplish the work of the organization. The nature and variety of the activities depend on the needs of the organization served.

Secretaries perform numerous tasks which are dissimilar in kind, but which have in common the purpose of assisting the work of one or more persons in an organization. Because all of the individual tasks performed by secretaries are related to the work of the people they assist, there are unique opportunities available for secretaries to increase the scope of their position. That is, by using information and insight obtained in performing one task, secretaries can enlarge scope and effectiveness of their performance of others. There is also a special opportunity for secretaries and the people they support to build a mutual working relationship which results in a secretary's acting and speaking for these individuals with an authority not common in other clerical positions.

The duties of a secretary are in some respects similar to those found in many of the specialized clerical series. Nevertheless, the value of these duties frequently cannot be evaluated by reference to the standards for the individual clerical series because the tasks, as performed by the secretary, are part of a broader and more inclusive responsibility which requires that the secretary be aware of virtually everything happening in the entire organization. The typical secretarial position requires a general knowledge of substantive work of the organization under the jurisdiction of the persons assisted and, as the secretary's participation in the management of the organization increases and as the nature and extent of that management effort increases through differences in the work situation, the amount of knowledge required increases accordingly. Positions at the lower grades consist primarily of clerical and procedural duties and, as positions increase in grade, administrative support functions are more predominant. At the higher levels, the secretary applies a very considerable knowledge of the organization, its objectives, and lines of communication.

Job Series Titles: (Click on the job title to view job vacancies for government and private sector jobs.) The USAJOBS selection lists all federal job vacancies for this job series.

USAJOBS GS-0318

 

Closed Microphone Reporting GS-0319

This series includes all classes of positions the principal duties of which are to supervise or perform the work involved in the recording and transcription of material spoken at conferences, hearings, or similar proceedings when the recording duties require the ability to operate closed microphone or similar mechanical equipment to reproduce the spoken material on a disk, cylinder, or similar device.

The federal government employs 79 Closed Microphone Reporters. All work are civilians working for the Department of the Army and Air Force.

Closed microphone reporting work involves the use of a closed microphone to make verbatim recordings of material spoken at conferences or similar proceedings and the transcription of the material recorded in this manner. The principal difference between closed microphone and shorthand reporting work is in the different techniques used to record the spoken word. The shorthand reporter uses manually or machine written symbols, requiring a high degree of skill and knowledge in their use. The closed microphone reporter uses the closed microphone device which requires the ability to repeat spoken material simultaneously with and at the rate equal to that used by the speaker. This element constitutes a specialized qualification requirement and a basis for series differentiation. The performance of closed microphone reporting working also involves vocabulary knowledge, ability to maintain sustained concentration, responsibility for the accuracy of the final transcript, and other knowledge, abilities, and responsibilities which are sufficiently equivalent in all significant respects to those required in shorthand reporting work that variations in the difficulty of closed microphone reporting work are measurable in terms of the same classification factors as those which provide the bases for grade-level differentiation in shorthand reporter positions.

Job Series Titles: (Click on the job title to view job vacancies for government and private sector jobs.) The USAJOBS selection lists all federal job vacancies for this job series.

USAJOBS GS-0319

 

Clerk-Typist GS-0322

Clerk typists perform typing work on either manual or electric typewriters. This work may be performed solely or in combination with general clerical work that does not require prior specialized experience or training. Included is typing work prepared from written material and voice recordings. Supervisory positions involved in supervising work characteristic of this series are also included when typing ability is an essential part of the job.

The federal government employs 76 clerk typists. All work for the Veterans Administration.

This series includes positions which involve typing work combined with clerical duties except when the clerical duties (a) require specialized experience or training and (b) constitute the paramount qualification requirement for the positions. Some, but not all, examples of clerical work which may require such specialized experience or training, and may thus be the basis for exclusion from this series, are duties characteristic of payroll, personnel, or supply clerk positions.

Job Series Titles: (Click on the job title to view job vacancies for government and private sector jobs.) The USAJOBS selection lists all federal job vacancies for this job series.

USAJOBS GS-0322

 

Automation Clerical & Assist. GS-0326

The office automation clerks and assistants perform office automation work, which includes word processing, either solely or in combination with clerical work, when such work is performed in the context of general office clerical support. Also included are positions that supervise work characteristic of this series when the knowledge, skills, and abilities for general office automation support work are essential requirements of the supervisory position. Positions in this series require: (1) knowledge of general office automation software, practices, and procedures; (2) competitive level proficiency in typing; and (3) ability to apply these knowledge and skills in the performance of general office support work.

The federal government employs 3,484 automation clerks and assistants of which 128 work overseas. The Departments of the Army, Navy, Air Force and the DOD are the largest employers with 1,751 civilians employed.  The Department of Agriculture employs 411 and the Veterans Administration 300. Most large cabinet level agencies and many medium sized agencies employ small numbers of this occupation. 

With the rapid evolution of electronic technology in the 1980's, office automation systems were developed that provided for the storage, manipulation, computation, reporting, and transmission of large amounts of information. These office automation systems were designed as a single piece of stand-alone equipment or as a work station or terminal linked to a mainframe, mini-computer, or local area network. They provided the capability for using more than one type of software within the same system. Now, in addition to word processing, these systems could provide capability for electronic spreadsheet, database management, electronic mail, desk-top publishing, and other types of software.

Current trends in office automation technology indicate that many offices have recently obtained or are in the process of obtaining electronic systems with multiple software capabilities. Also, an increasingly greater variety of functions are being included within software packages. Word processing software packages, for example, include increasingly greater capabilities for graphics, calculations, and sorting information. At the same time, an increase in user aids such as menus and screen prompts facilitates use of the full range of functions available within software packages. These increases in the types of software available, the functions available within software packages, and various user aids generate new opportunities for automating the administrative work of the office.

Job Series Titles: (Click on the job title to view job vacancies for government and private sector jobs.) The USAJOBS selection lists all federal job vacancies for this job series.

USAJOBS GS-0326

 

Computer Operation GS-0332

This series includes positions the paramount duties of which involve operating or supervising the operation of the controls of the digital computer system. Also included are positions involving the operation of peripheral equipment when: (a) such equipment is used directly in support of computer operations; and (b) the operation of such equipment is directly related to acquiring the knowledge and skills needed in operating the control console of a computer system. Positions in this series require a knowledge of the functions of the various computer features and the skill to read, interpret, and correctly respond to information in the form in which it is transmitted through the computer system.

Excluded Positions: Positions involving responsibility for information technology systems and services used in the automated acquisition, storage, manipulation, management, movement, control, display, switching, interchange, transmission, assurance, or reception of information. Such positions are classified in the Job Family Position Classification Standard for Administrative Work in Information Technology, GS-2200.

The federal government employs 355 Computer Operators. The Treasury Department is the largest employer with 116 followed by the Departments of the Army, Navy, Air Force with 88 civilians employed. Social Security employs 64, the VA 25 and the Commence Department 15. 

Computer operators must have ability to isolate and resolve problems encountered during processing since errors that result in the loss of information, erroneous work products, or damage to the programs are costly. Restructuring lost data and rerunning programs involve the expenditure of substantial resources in terms of machine time and the time and efforts required by others such as programmers, system analysts, and subject-matter specialists. An operator's knowledge of the system and the ability to utilize such knowledge to keep the system running, recover from full or partial failures, or save jobs in progress without resorting to full restart and/or data restoration procedures can often spell the difference between timely accomplishment of work and costly delays. The operator's alertness, speed, and accuracy of judgment in determining what should or should not be done are crucial requirements when problems arise

Job Series Titles: (Click on the job title to view job vacancies for government and private sector jobs.) The USAJOBS selection lists all federal job vacancies for this job series.

USAJOBS GS-0332

 

Computer Clerk and Assistant, GS-0335

This series covers positions involving performance or supervision of data processing support and services functions for users of digital computer systems including such work as: (1) receiving, maintaining, and issuing data storage media for computer operations; (2) collecting and sequentially staging input media with associated program instructions for processing; (3) scheduling the use of computer time for program processing; (4) collecting, maintaining, and distributing program and systems documentation; and (5) collecting raw information, preparing flow charts, and coding in program languages; or, (6) other support functions. This work requires knowledge of external data processing sequences, controls, procedures, or user and programming languages, rather than in-depth knowledge of computer requirements or techniques associated with development and design of data processing systems.

The federal government employs 2,280 computer clerks and assistants of which 44work overseas. All but 2 cabinet level agencies have employees in this group along with some at large independent agencies. The largest employer is the Department of the Air Force with 703 civilians employed in this group.

Employees in this occupation support or assist other employees who design, operate, or use automatic data processing systems applications and products. Most positions involve work in one or a mix of functional areas typically identified as tape library, production control, scheduling or direct support to subject matter or computer specialists. Descriptions of the work and the qualifications required are discussed under those headings.

Job Series Titles: (Click on the job title to view job vacancies for government and private sector jobs.) The USAJOBS selection lists all federal job vacancies for this job series.

USAJOBS GS-0335

 

Administrative Officer Series, GS-0341

 

This series includes positions in which the employees are responsible for providing or obtaining a variety of management services essential to the direction and operation of an organization. The paramount qualifications required are extensive knowledge and understanding of management principles, practices, methods and techniques, and skill in integrating management services with the general management of an organization.

Administrative management work is primarily concerned with providing, securing or negotiating for the resources or services needed to manage and run an organization. It involves direct assistance to the "operating" manager -- i.e., the official with the primary responsibility for the direction of an organization or unit established to accomplish a basic goal or mission.

The federal government employs 9,285 administrative officers of which 345 work overseas. The Veterans Administration is the largest employer with 1,809 employed followed by the Health and Human Services with 1,301 and their are 1181 with the Department of the Army. All cabinet level and many large agencies employ this occupation.

An administrative officer aids the operating manager and subordinate operating officials in getting things done through his knowledge of and skills in dealing with organization, methods, funds, people, equipment, and other tools or resources of management. Ordinarily, he has a responsible role in the management of both financial and human resources because of his immediate relationship to the operating manager. He generally does key work in several other vital functions or services such as management analysis, procurement, contract administration, property management, space management, security administration, reports management, data processing, and similar or closely related activities.

An administrative officer is a generalist. The total management process is his interest, and the proficiency required involves many aspects of management. General management skills are the paramount requirement. Though aspects such as budget administration and personnel management assume major importance in many positions and other aspects such as procurement and property management are also important in many jobs, no single functional, resource or service area forms a basis for the paramount skills.

Job Series Titles: (Click on the job title to view job vacancies for government and private sector jobs.) The USAJOBS selection lists all federal job vacancies for this job series.

USAJOBS GS-0341

 

Support Services Admin GS-0342

Support services supervisors are involved with supervising, directing, or planning and coordinating a variety of services functions that are principally work-supporting, i.e., those functions without which the operations of an organization or services to the public would be impaired, curtailed, or stopped. Such service functions include (but are not limited to) communications, procurement of administrative supplies and equipment, printing, reproduction, property management, space management, records management, mail service, facilities and equipment maintenance, and transportation.

The federal government employs 2,054 support services supervisors or lead support services specialists. The Departments of the Army, Navy, Air Force, and DOD are the largest employers with 525 civilians employed . The Department of Agriculture has 403 followed by the Treasury Department with 402. Small numbers are employed at most large cabinet level and a few large independent agencies.

Positions classified in this series are primarily concerned with and responsible for planning, directing, coordinating, or supervising a variety of general support service functions that are essential to the orderly and efficient accomplishment of the work of an organization, or to the provision of services to the public. The relative importance of individual functions to accomplishment of such work or provision of such services varies widely among organizations. Similarly, the number and type of functions performed and services provided through a support services program will vary according to the specific operational needs of each organization.

Positions covered by this series are found at all organizational levels within Federal agencies and departments. They range from operational positions responsible for providing support services to small field offices, to positions supervising the provision of support services to large organizations, to program and policy development positions at headquarters levels. Positions covered by this series are most frequently found within administrative management elements of organizations. Less frequently, they may report directly to the head of the organization serviced. Regardless of the location of the positions within organizations or the individuals to whom they report, incumbents of positions covered by this series share a common responsibility for assuring the performance of those functions that facilitate the work of the organization serviced

Job Series Titles: (Click on the job title to view job vacancies for government and private sector jobs.) The USAJOBS selection lists all federal job vacancies for this job series.

USAJOBS GS-0342

 

Management and Program Analysis Series, GS-0343

 

This series includes positions that primarily serve as analysts and advisors to management on the evaluation of the effectiveness of government programs and operations or the productivity and efficiency of the management of Federal agencies or both. Positions in this series require knowledge of: the substantive nature of agency programs and activities; agency missions, policies, and objectives; management principles and processes; and the analytical and evaluative methods and techniques for assessing program development or execution and improving organizational effectiveness and efficiency. Some positions also require an understanding of basic budgetary and financial management principles and techniques as they relate to long range planning of programs and objectives. The work requires skill in: application of fact-finding and investigative techniques; oral and written communications; and development of presentations and reports.

The federal government employs 70,919 management and program analysts of which 1,068 work overseas. The Department of the Navy is the largest employer with 9,516 civilians employed followed by the Department of the Army with 7,095 and their are 5,574 with the Veterans Administration. All cabinet level and large independent agencies employ substantial numbers in this series.

This series includes positions formerly classified in the Management Analysis Series, GS-0343, and the Program Analysis Series, GS-0345. This new series combines in one occupation positions which perform similar duties and require many of the same, or closely related, knowledge and skills. The intent in establishing this series is to cover staff administrative analytical and evaluative work related to program operations, and management and organizational efficiency and productivity. Staff positions which require full competence in a particular specialized or subject-matter field for satisfactory performance of the work are excluded from this series.

The work of this occupation is typically performed in a staff capacity in that the results of the work support the accomplishment of the principal mission or line program(s) of the agency or organizational component in which the positions are located. In some cases, particularly in the larger agencies, the distinction may not always be readily apparent. For example, the mission or line work of an organizational component may be the development of staffing standards to be used throughout the agency. Positions involved in this work may be considered as performing the line work of the immediate organizational component. However, since the results of the work (i. e., the staffing standards) support accomplishment of the overall programs and mission of the agency, the positions are in fact performing staff work for the agency.

Positions in this series serve as staff analysts, evaluators, and advisors to management on the effectiveness and efficiency with which agencies and their components carry out their assigned programs and functions. Such positions may be found at any organizational level within Federal agencies. The primary purpose of the work is to provide line managers with objectively based information for making decisions on the administrative and programmatic aspects of agency operations and management. Positions in this series are concerned with a wide variety of assignments.

Job Series Titles: (Click on the job title to view job vacancies for government and private sector jobs.) The USAJOBS selection lists all federal job vacancies for this job series.

USAJOBS GS-0343

 

Management Clerical & Assist. GS-0344

This series includes positions involved in supervising or performing clerical and technical work in support of management analysis and program analysis, the purposes of which are to evaluate and improve the efficiency, effectiveness, and productivity of organizations and programs. The work requires a practical knowledge of the purposes, methods, and techniques of management analysis and/or program analysis and the structures, functions, processes, objectives, products, services, resource requirements, and similar features of Government programs and organizations.

The federal government employs 5,657 management clerks and assistants of which 30 work overseas. The Departments of the Army, Navy, Air Force, and DOD are the largest employers with1,967 civilians employed . The Department of the Treasury employs 1,037 followed by the VA with 505. Most cabinet level agencies and a few large independent agencies employ workers in this job series. 

Employees in this series perform clerical and technical work in support of management analysis and/or program analysis. The purpose of management and program analysis is to analyze, evaluate, and improve the efficiency, effectiveness, and productivity of organizations and programs and to provide managers with objectively based information for making decisions on the administrative and operational aspects of agency management and program operations. These administrative and operational aspects include organizational or program structures, functions, objectives and goals, processes, products, services, performance requirements, projects, and resources.

Management clerks and assistants apply clerical and technical procedures, methods, and techniques to support management analysis functions and processes. Management analysis involves analyzing, evaluating, and improving the efficiency of internal administrative processes, organizations, or management. This includes studying and recommending improvements to organizational structures, processes, and workflow, and in the use of staff, funding, and other resources. Management analysis also involves developing, evaluating, and advising on the methods and policies for providing administrative or information management systems to agencies, such as records, directives, mail, or forms management systems.

Program clerks and assistants apply clerical or technical procedures, methods, and techniques to support program analysis functions and processes. Program analysis involves planning, analyzing, and evaluating the effectiveness of line or operating programs. This includes developing agency program objectives, identifying required resources (e.g., staff, money, and materials), measuring program progress and quality of service, and devising actions to resolve program problems in meeting goals and objectives.

Job Series Titles: (Click on the job title to view job vacancies for government and private sector jobs.) The USAJOBS selection lists all federal job vacancies for this job series.

USAJOBS GS-0344

 

Logistics Management Series, GS-0346

This series covers positions concerned with directing, developing, or performing logistics management operations that involve planning, coordinating, or evaluating the logistical actions required to support a specified mission, weapons system, or other designated program. The work involves (1) identifying the specific requirements for money, manpower, material, facilities, and services needed to support the program and (2) correlating those requirements with program plans to assure that the needed support is provided at the right time and place. Logistics work requires (1) knowledge of agency program planning, funding, and management information systems, (2) broad knowledge of the organization and functions of activities involved in providing logistical support, and (3) ability to coordinate and evaluate the efforts of functional specialists to identify specific requirements and to develop and adjust plans and schedules for the actions needed to meet each requirement on time.

The federal government employs 19,230 logistic management specialists of which 732 work overseas. The Department of the Army, Navy and Air Force employ the vast majority,17,626 civilians followed by the Department of Defense with 531, HHS with 336 and the Department of Transportation with 287. Most cabinet level and many large independent agencies employ this occupation.

Positions in this series require some degree of specialized knowledge of some or all of the logistics support activities involved. The paramount qualification requirement, however, is the ability to integrate the separate functions in planning or implementing a logistics management program. (Positions in which specialized knowledge's of logistics support functions are the paramount requirement are classified to whichever specialized or general series is most appropriate.)

Charles Siebott was interviewed for an article on our federal jobs blog titled Logistic Management Specialists (GS-0343) Jobs. Siebott is a retired GS-0346-11, logistic management specialist (logistics program coordinator) who worked for the Department of Transportation, Federal Aviation Administration (FAA). Siebott states he choose this career path because “previous military testing indicated an aptitude for an administrative career path vice engineering or mechanical.” The most exciting parts of being in logistics according to Siebott is the wide areas of involvement; i.e. acquisition, contracting, construction, real estate leasing, services (maintenance of elevators, grounds maintenance, etc.) transportation, government shipments (Government Bills of Lading), Inventory Control of property and equipment and more. Siebott indicates, “A logistic management specialist is absolutely a great career, and my previous twenty year military logistical experience prepared me for a very successful twenty five year government career”. Siebott suggests, “Discover your aptitude and pursue it! Being a logistics management specialist exposes you to all facets of the business world.”

The primary responsibilities of logistics management specialists are:

  • To identify all activities that will be involved in providing needed logistical support;
  • To integrate the actions required of each activity into a comprehensive logistics plan in support of or to be incorporated into overall program plans;
  • To monitor progress toward meeting the logistics plan and to identify the cause and impact of delays or other problems (varying degrees of responsibility for taking actions to prevent or overcome such problems may also be included);
  • To adjust plans and schedules for all related actions as required by delays or changes to logistics requirements; and
  • To evaluate plans for and provision of logistical support for feasibility, efficiency, and economy, and to develop alternatives when required.

Job Series Titles: (Click on the job title to view job vacancies for government and private sector jobs.) The USAJOBS selection lists all federal job vacancies for this job series.

USAJOBS GS-0346

 

Equipment Operator GS-0350

This series covers positions that involve supervising, leading, or operating microfilm equipment, peripheral equipment, mail processing equipment, duplicating equipment, and copier/duplicating equipment requiring a knowledge of the operating characteristics of the equipment and controls, the skill and knowledge to set up and adjust the equipment and controls to produce acceptable products or services on a timely basis, and the skill to perform normal operator maintenance.

The federal government employs 317 equipment operators. The Treasury Department is the largest employer with 81 followed by the Veterans Administration with 75 and the Commerce Department with 65. The Agriculture Department employs 32, Social Security 19, and the DOD with 13.

Most equipment operators within this series set up, operate, adjust, and monitor the operation of a variety of single function machines and, to a lesser extent, multiple function machines (e.g., mail processing equipment which sorts computer generated addresses alphabetically or by zip code, produces address labels and then affixes the labels on envelopes). In addition to the obvious tasks of operating machines, operators typically perform minor clerical tasks related or incidental to machine operation and minor repairs/maintenance on equipment operated. The equipment is operated on a substantially full-time basis to facilitate increased speed, accuracy, and economy in government operations.

Job Series Titles: (Click on the job title to view job vacancies for government and private sector jobs.) The USAJOBS selection lists all federal job vacancies for this job series.

USAJOBS GS-0350

 

Data Transcriber GS-0356

Data transcribers are  involved with operating or supervising the operation of keyboard controlled machines (such as card punch machines, paper tape recording machines, magnetic tape, or disc encoders, optical character equipment, and computer controlled data entry, update and remote inquiry devices) to transcribe or verify data in a form that can be used in automated data processing systems. The work requires (1) skill in operating typewriter or a modified typewriter style alphabetic and numeric keyboard with acceptable speed and accuracy, and (2) ability to understand and apply machine operating and data transcribing procedures. Data transcribing work that is combined with clerical work is covered in this series unless the clerical work requires specialized experience or training that constitutes the paramount qualification requirement of the position.

The federal government employs 731 data transcribers. The Treasury Department employs 691 and the National Archives and Records Administration employs 26.

Some data transcribing equipment has the capability of entering data directly into the computer system and of retrieving and modifying records stored in the system. Operators of such equipment follow a specified sequence of steps to activate the equipment and to respond to specified operating signals or data rejections from the computer, but are not required to understand the processes whereby the data are retrieved from or transmitted to the computer. The necessary operating procedures can be learned in a few days of training. Thus the keyboard operating skills and the knowledge of data transcribing procedures characteristic of the GS-0356 series represent the paramount qualification requirements of such positions.

Job Series Titles: (Click on the job title to view job vacancies for government and private sector jobs.) The USAJOBS selection lists all federal job vacancies for this job series.

USAJOBS GS-0356

 

Equal Opportunity Compliance Series, GS-0360

This series includes positions performing, supervising, or managing analytical, evaluative, and interpretive equal opportunity and civil rights compliance work. Positions in this series are concerned with the application of civil rights and equal opportunity laws, regulations, and precedent decisions to eliminate illegal discrimination and to remove barriers to equal opportunity. This work involves analyzing and solving equal opportunity and civil rights problems through fact-finding, problem analysis, negotiation, and voluntary compliance programs. The work requires judgment in applying equal opportunity principles to solve problems or recommend action. Many positions in this series require specialized knowledge and skill in investigating and resolving allegations of discrimination. This series also includes equal opportunity or civil rights positions of an analytical, evaluative, and interpretative nature that are not properly classified to another series.

The federal government employs 1,392 EEO specialists. The largest employer is the Department of Labor with 509 followed by HUD with 347 and the Department of Transportation with 90. Most cabinet level and some large agencies employ equal opportunity specialists.

As used in this standard, the term compliance has a broad meaning. The term not only covers the investigation of alleged violations of the law, but also includes a broad range of related work, such as conciliating to resolve complaint issues or advising company executives on voluntary compliance matters.

This series includes positions involved in the enforcement of equal opportunity and civil rights laws, orders, regulations. The field of civil rights and equal opportunity is defined by a body of laws and regulations and administrative decisions. These laws and policies are designed to protect civil rights and to provide equal opportunity in a wide range of economic, social, and political activities including, but not necessarily limited to, employment, housing, education, social services, business, and finance. Civil rights and equal opportunity laws and policies prohibit discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, handicapping condition, or other bases specified by law.

Positions in this series involve fact-finding, analysis, writing, and application of civil rights or equal opportunity principles to identify and/or solve problems.

Job Series Titles: (Click on the job title to view job vacancies for government and private sector jobs.) The USAJOBS selection lists all federal job vacancies for this job series.

USAJOBS GS-0360

 

Equal Opportunity Assistance GS-0361

This series includes positions supervising or performing technical work and substantive clerical work in support of equal opportunity and civil rights programs or activities. The paramount qualification requirement is a practical knowledge of the methods, procedures, regulations, and purposes of the equal opportunity or civil rights function the positions support. These positions do not require the broad knowledge of equal opportunity and civil rights principles, or the depth of skill in analysis, interpretation, and decision-making characteristic of the Equal Opportunity Compliance Series, GS-0360, Equal Employment Opportunity Series, GS-0260, and Civil Rights Analysis Series, GS-0160.

The federal government employs 235 equal opportunity assistants. The largest employer is the Veterans Administration with 49, followed by HUD with 29, and the Department of Labor with 25. Small numbers are employed at most of the cabinet level agencies.

Positions in the Equal Opportunity Assistance Series perform technical work in support of functions such as investigation of allegations of discrimination, conciliation of discrimination cases, review of compliance with equal opportunity regulations, administration of internal Federal equal employment opportunity programs, voluntary compliance programs, civil rights research, and similar functions.

The essential difference between positions in the Equal Opportunity Compliance, Equal Employment Opportunity, and Civil Rights Analysis Series and positions in this series is that the former series involve interpretative and judgmental work requiring a broader base of knowledge and skills, more depth of analysis, and broader responsibility. This distinction is also discussed briefly in the introductory material in the position classification standard for these other series. In order to make distinctions in borderline cases it may be necessary to refer to the classification standard and the qualification standard for all these other related series and the Equal Opportunity Assistance Series to compare and contrast the duties, responsibilities, and qualification requirements of these occupations.

Job Series Titles: (Click on the job title to view job vacancies for government and private sector jobs.) The USAJOBS selection lists all federal job vacancies for this job series.

USAJOBS GS-0361

 

Telephone Operating GS-0382

This series includes one grade interval work that involves operating or supervising the operation of telephone switchboard equipment to connect incoming and outgoing calls. The work involves routing the calls to their proper destinations and providing telephone and organizational information to callers.

The federal government employs 562 telephone operators. The largest employer is the Department of Health and Human Services with 75, followed by the Veterans Administration with 40, and the Department of the Air force with 25. Small numbers work for other agencies.

Telephone operating work in Federal agencies requires knowledge of telephone regulations and procedures and skill in operating telephone equipment and lines to route incoming and outgoing calls. It requires the use of telephone courtesy and tact in dealing with a diversity of callers, sometimes under very difficult and stressful circumstances. The work also requires speed and accuracy, and in some locations it requires observing strict security measures.

Job Series Titles: (Click on the job title to view job vacancies for government and private sector jobs.) The USAJOBS selection lists all federal job vacancies for this job series.

USAJOBS GS-0382

 

Telecommunications Series, GS-0391

This occupation includes positions that involve 1) technical and analytical work pertaining to the planning, development, acquisition, testing, integration, installation, utilization, or modification of telecommunications systems, facilities, services, and procedures; 2) managerial and staff work in the planning, implementation, or program management of telecommunications programs, systems, and services or, 3) line supervision over communications operations, when such work includes responsibility for management functions such as planning, recommending changes and determining organizational structure, staffing, training, and budgetary requirements.

The federal government employs 5,766 telecommunications specialists of which 261 work overseas. The Department of the Army, Navy and Air Force employ 2,839 civilians followed by HHS with 632. All cabinet level and some large agencies employ this occupation.

Telecommunications specialists are primarily concerned with the movement of information between locations. Information may be moved in the form of voice communications such as with radio or telephone (including cellular), data communications involving digital transmission between computers, computer terminals, facsimile stations, or video communications such as that used in teleconferencing.

They use knowledge of performance characteristics of communications equipment, systems, services, and transmission media. They must have some understanding of basic electronics theory and operating principles, the applications of existing and planned technology to communications requirements, equipment interoperability and compatibility, and the methods and techniques for acquiring equipment, systems, and services to accomplish information transfer.

Some specialists require knowledge of public utility and customer responsibilities involving customer premise equipment (telephone exchanges, switches, etc.), copper cable connectivity, cabling used inside and outside buildings, PBX (Private Branch Exchange) software, underground conduits, and microwave radio systems used for bypassing obstacles. Some need to use knowledge of building codes and standards in planning installations and connections.

Telecommunications work requires: (1) an understanding of electronic communications concepts, principles, practices, procedures, policies, standards, and operational requirements; (2) a technical knowledge of the operational and performance characteristics of communications equipment, automated control and network management systems, transmission media, and the relationships among component parts of telecommunications systems; and (3) the ability to apply specialized communications methods and analytical techniques. 

Some telecommunications specialists apply an understanding of basic electronics theory, concepts, and principles similar to those applied by engineers, although they apply less than a full professional knowledge of engineering and related scientific theory and principles. As an essential requirement in accomplishing the work, the telecommunications specialist applies knowledge's of the communications needs of users, operational practices and procedures, message handling techniques, and similar specialized communications knowledge's in addition to the quasi-engineering knowledge required.

Similarly, telecommunications specialists use knowledge of data processing equipment and communications related applications programs. The knowledge of automation/ADP equipment and processes applied by telecommunications specialists involves a practical understanding of automation concepts and communications interfaces and compatibilities for receiving, storing, processing, and/or transmitting of digital information within a system. This limited practical automation interface and compatibility knowledge is secondary to the primary knowledge requirement for communications theories, principles, concepts, and practices and does not involve or require specific or in-depth knowledge of how computers work internally and/or how programs are developed. They define operating criteria, monitor installation, and perform testing to determine the quality and efficiency of automated equipment and software. They critique such performance so that computer specialists (Federal or vendor) may make corrections or adjustments in software or operating systems to provide the kinds and levels of service specified in telecommunications system requirements).

Job Series Titles: (Click on the job title to view job vacancies for government and private sector jobs.) The USAJOBS selection lists all federal job vacancies for this job series.

USAJOBS GS-0391

 

General Communications GS-0392

This series includes one-grade interval positions that involve performing or supervising miscellaneous telecommunication duties not provided for in other series. Positions in this series do not typically involve substantial operation of telecommunications equipment to send and receive messages, but do require knowledge of telecommunications techniques to facilitate the flow of messages.

The federal government employs communication specialists. The Departments of the Army, Navy, and Air Force employs 84 civilians followed by the VA with 29 and the Interior Department with 17.

Job Series Titles: (Click on the job title to view job vacancies for government and private sector jobs.) The USAJOBS selection lists all federal job vacancies for this job series.

USAJOBS GS-0392

 

Communications Clerical GS-0394

This series includes all classes of positions the duties of which are to supervise or perform communications clerical work required in support of communications operations or in the maintenance of communications records when the work requires knowledge of and ability to apply communications instructions, rules, regulations, and procedures, but does not require knowledge of the concepts, methodology, and techniques of communications or of technical communications principles. Included in this series is such clerical work as: keeping memorandum records of communication operations and services, clerical processing and maintaining records of frequency allocations, clerical processing and maintaining records of call sign allocations, maintaining records of common communication rates and tariffs, maintaining records of circuit usage and equipment, and the compilation of summaries and reports and other clerical work incident to the support of communication operations or the maintenance of communication records

The federal government employs 34 communication specialists. The Departments of Veterans Affairs employs the majority of the workers in this series. 

The communications clerk typically uses instructions, guidelines, tariffs, and related materials to perform the duties of the position. The exact nature of the materials used varies among individual positions depending on the communications clerical function performed. Typical guides include internal operating instructions, commercial communications rate and tariff books, International Telecommunications Union publications, agency call signs books, agency communications handbooks and manuals, and commercial public utilities= and equipment manufacturers= publications. The use of such materials by communications clerks does not require a technical knowledge of communication media.

Job Series Titles: (Click on the job title to view job vacancies for government and private sector jobs.) The USAJOBS selection lists all federal job vacancies for this job series.

USAJOBS GS-0394