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GS - 0800

 

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The Book of U.S. Government Jobs - 11th edition

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Page updated 11/12/2016

 

This group includes all classes of positions, the duties of which are to advise on, administer, supervise, or perform professional, scientific, or technical work concerned with engineering or architectural projects, facilities, structures, systems, processes, equipment, devices, material or methods. Positions in this group require knowledge of the science or art, or both, by which materials, natural resources, and power are made useful.

There are 130,253 federal workers employed in this group in 2016 within most Executive Branch departments and large independent agencies including the EPA (2,032), NASA (10,271), the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (1,697), and the SBA (254). The largest employers are the Department of Army, Air Force and Navy combined employ over 86,000 civilians in this group. All of the cabinet level agencies with the exception of the Department of Education employ workers in the GS-0800 group with mechanical and civil engineers employing over 11,000 each. The majority of Nuclear Engineers work for the Department of the Navy, Department of Energy, and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission.

Don't overlook any agency in your job search as there are small numbers employed in this group spread throughout most Executive Departments and some independent agencies.  For example the Federal Communications Commission employs 233 from this group while as few as 13 are employed from this group by the National Archives and Records Administration.

The following information is compiled from numerous federal documents including qualification standards, job announcements, career articles, occupation flysheets, FEDSCOPE, OPM, Agency websites, interviews with federal employees, The United States Government Manual, and from the Department of Labor's Occupational Outlook Handbook.

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GS-0800 — Engineering & Architecture Occupation Menu

 

GS-0800 Job Listings

 

Job Listings Click the job title for job listings, the number employed, hiring agencies, and job series definitions.

 

 

Job Series Definitions

These position descriptions are excerpted from the qualification standards for select job titles in this group. In the General Schedule position classification system is established under chapter 51 of title 5, United States Code. The term “General Schedule” or “GS” denotes the major position classification system and pay structure for white collar work in the Federal government. Agencies that are no longer subject to chapter 51 have replaced the GS pay plan indicator with agency-unique pay plan indicators. For example, the Bureau of Prisons uses GL instead of the GS designation. For this reason, reference to General Schedule or GS is often omitted from the individual qualification standard sheets.

A brief introduction for major occupations within this group is provided below.

General Engineering 0801

This series covers positions managing, supervising, leading, and/or performing professional engineering and scientific work. This series is applicable when the work of the position:

  • requires knowledge and skills in two or more professional engineering series within the Engineering and Architecture Group, 0800, and no one discipline is paramount; or

  • is consistent with engineering work in this occupational group, but is not covered by an established series.

The federal government employs 25,661 general engineers or interdisciplinary engineers of which 400 work overseas. The Department of the Army, Air Force and Navy are the largest employers with 13,677 civilians followed by NASA with 3,123 and the Department of Defense with 1,495. All cabinet level agencies except for the Department of Education and some large independent agencies employ general engineers.

Job Series Titles: (Click on the job title to view job vacancies for government and private sector jobs.) The USAJOBS selection lists all federal job vacancies for this job series.

 

Engineering Technical 0802

 

This series covers technical positions supervising, leading, or performing work involving applying a practical knowledge of the:

  • methods and techniques of engineering or architecture; and
  • construction, application, properties, operations, and limitations of engineering systems, processes, structures, machinery, devices, and materials.

The federal government employs 14,128 engineering technicians of which 140 work overseas. The Department of the Army, Air Force and Navy are the largest employers with 10,351 civilians followed by The Department of Agriculture with 969 and the Department of the Interior with 601. Most cabinet level agencies and some large independent agencies employ engineering technicians.

Engineering technicians work in a variety of unique work situations, often aligned with professional engineering and architecture fields and each with a fairly distinct set of knowledge and skill requirements. The work involves functions such as research, development, design, evaluation, construction, inspection, production, application, standardization, testing, or operation of engineering facilities, structures, systems, processes, equipment, devices, or materials. Basic knowledge and skills are transferable from one specialization to another.

The positions do not require professional knowledge and abilities for full performance and therefore do not require training equivalent in type and scope to that represented by completing a professional curriculum leading to a bachelor’s degree in engineering or architecture.

Job Series Titles: (Click on the job title to view job vacancies for government and private sector jobs.) The USAJOBS selection lists all federal job vacancies for this job series.

 

Safety Engineering 0803

This series covers positions managing, supervising, leading, and/or performing professional engineering and scientific work involving safety, health, and environmental issues anticipating, dealing with, eliminating, or controlling hazardous conditions, exposures, and practices. These hazards may result from human error, equipment, or machine operation and may lead to injuries or damage to property or the environment.

The federal government employs 487 safety engineers of which 4 work overseas. The Department of the Army, Air Force and Navy are the largest employers with 1284 civilians followed by The Department of Labor with 89 and the Department of Energy with 26. Many cabinet level agencies and a few large independent agencies employ safety engineers.

Safety engineering work involves the generation and/or application of theories, principles, practical concepts, systems, and processes related to:

  • the science of safety engineering, engineering design, and the traditional engineering science disciplines (e.g., civil, mechanical, electrical, and chemical);
  • design standards and codes relevant to safety engineering practices and methods;
  • physical science disciplines, advanced mathematics, and economics;
  • critical inquiry, problem solving, and scientific methodology;
  • safety related elements of ergonomics, psychology, and physiology; and
  • safety principles, standards, practices, and analytical techniques.

Safety engineers identify, analyze, and control hazardous conditions, exposures, and practices. They apply their knowledge of psychological and physiological factors to design and/or evaluate safety features and controls compensating for the possibility of human errors in the operation of machinery and equipment. This work frequently includes analyzing materials, structures, safety codes, legal requirements, and operations; advising on safety requirements, including the economic impact of alternative solutions; and conducting accident investigations and inspections or reviews of facilities, plans, and equipment.

Within the Federal Government, professional safety engineering work is performed in a wide variety of environments such as health research, energy generation, construction and facilities management, industrial and manufacturing operations, recreation, and transportation.

Job Series Titles: (Click on the job title to view job vacancies for government and private sector jobs.) The USAJOBS selection lists all federal job vacancies for this job series.

 

Fire Protection Engineering 0804

This series covers positions managing, supervising, leading, and/or performing professional engineering and scientific work to protect life and property from destructive fire. This work includes:

  • assessment and prediction of fire hazards or risks;
  • mitigation of fire damage by proper design, construction, and arrangement of facilities;
  • research, development, and testing of fire protection technologies (e.g., halon and water mist applicators);
  • design, construction, inspection, testing, and operation of fire detection and fire suppression apparatus, appliances, devices, and systems; and
  • assessment of fire protection requirements.

The federal government employs 238 fire protection engineers of which 10 work overseas. The Department of the Navy is the largest employer with 57 civilians followed by The General Services Administration with 36, and the Department of the Army with 26. A few cabinet level agencies and large independent agencies employ fire protection engineers.

Fire protection engineering work involves the generation and/or application of theories, principles, practical concepts, processes, and methods of fire prevention and fire phenomena related to:

fire protection engineering science, engineering design, and the traditional engineering science disciplines (e.g., civil, mechanical, electrical, and chemical);

  • design or evaluation of the designs of integrated systems involving suppression, detection, and electrical and electronic alarm systems;
  • design standards and codes for fire protection engineering techniques and practices;
  • physical science disciplines, advanced mathematics, and/or economics;
  • critical inquiry, analytical reasoning, and scientific methodology;
  • performance-based modeling and calculations for fire growth and egress;
  • human responses to emergency situations;
  • fire tests and measurements; and
  • system concepts of fire safety and methods of analysis and evaluation.

Fire protection engineers prevent, identify, and mitigate fire hazards. They also detect, control, and suppress fire events. Fire protection engineers typically:

  • consider the effects of fire on people, structures, commodities, and the continuity of operations;
  • identify fire hazards and their risks, the cost of protection, and fire safety design;
  • develop, interpret, and promote fire safety codes and standards;
  • use quantitative methods to assess aspects of fire and fire safety; and
  • determine and apply scientific principles and theories of fire phenomena.

Fire protection engineers examine the nature and characteristics of fire phenomena and the associated products of combustion. They determine how fires originate, spread, and are detected, controlled, and/or extinguished. Their work includes the anticipation and prediction of fire behavior on materials, structures, machines, and apparatus to protect life and property.
Fire protection engineers integrate knowledge of various engineering and scientific disciplines to perform work such as:

  • design overall fire protection systems;
  • conduct investigations into post fire incidents; and
  • provide specifications for building construction, exit and egress means, and mechanical systems.

Job Series Titles: (Click on the job title to view job vacancies for government and private sector jobs.) The USAJOBS selection lists all federal job vacancies for this job series.

 

Materials Engineer GS-0806

This series covers positions managing, supervising, leading, and/or performing professional engineering and scientific work to:

  •  determine and advise on a material's essential composition, atomic and molecular configuration, and processing;
  • relate the material’s essential composition to its properties, end use, and performance in engineering, architecture, and scientific applications and programs;
  • examine the interaction of materials in their processes and applications, taking into account the associated equipment, systems, components, and their fabrication, design, or use;
  • develop, maintain, and apply materials and material solutions to meet certain mechanical, electrical, environmental, and chemical requirements; and/or
  • test and evaluate substances for new applications.

The federal government employs 1,325 materials engineers. The Departments of the Army, Navy and Air force employ 825 civilians followed by NASA with 284, and the DOD with 90. The Department of Commerce employs 80 and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission employs 56. A few other cabinet level agencies employ small numbers of this occupation.

Most federal materials engineers work in agriculture, defense, aviation, space exploration, health, nuclear energy, and transportation agencies. Their work frequently includes monitoring and administering activities through contracts and grants. These engineers also provide outreach and educational services to research, industrial, and private sectors expanding and promoting the use of new and improved materials.

The basic title for positions in this occupation is Materials Engineer. In addition to the basic title, the following parenthetical titles may be used:

  • Ceramics – Work primarily involving nonmetallic, inorganic materials:
    •  generally requiring high temperatures for processing; and
    • including crystalline materials, cementitious materials, abrasives, refractories, porcelain enamels, structural clay products, white ware, and glass products.
  • Coatings – Work primarily involving organic/inorganic coatings (typically solids) for control of radiant and electromagnetic energy, protection from environmental conditions, lubrication, corrosion protection, and minimization of wear.
  •  Composites – Work primarily involving manufacturing materials fabricated by combining two or more distinct materials to create better materials, such as particulate or fiber-reinforced metal, polymer, and ceramic materials.
  • Electromagnetics – Work primarily encompassing:
    • materials involved with the interaction of light and surfaces or volume of material in which the light is reflected or refracted due to electromagnetic field interaction; and
    • activities involving physical changes in a material caused by electromagnetic energy.
  • Environmental Effects – Work primarily involving the use of materials in special or corrosive environments (e.g., combustion, high-pressure oxygen, vacuum, atomic-oxygen, hydrogen, and ultra-violet light).
  • Failure Analysis – Work primarily involving the investigation and evaluation of failed materials and surfaces to determine causes of failure.
  • Fluids – Work primarily involving:
    • liquids including materials for fuels, energetics, solvents, hydraulics, coolants, refrigeration, and fire-fighting and -suppression; and

    • liquid and gaseous lubricants and their properties and characteristics under various loads and environmental conditions.

  • Manufacturing – Work primarily involving improving or developing fabrication or processing techniques for manufacturing materials.
  • Metals – Work primarily involving metals and alloys typically selected by testing and evaluating compatibility with end uses.
  •  Nondestructive Evaluation – Work primarily involving the development and application of methods for detecting flaws and discontinuations in materials.
  • Polymers – Work primarily involving polymers with potential to improve products (e.g., plastics, adhesives, elastomers, coatings, and fibers).
  • Structural Analysis – Work primarily involving the determination of mechanical properties under varying conditions of load (e.g., tension, stress rupture, and low and high cycle fatigue) and the development of methods and models to predict the life of materials under service conditions.
  • Textiles – Work primarily involving natural or synthetic fibers, fibrous materials, and textiles.

Job Series Titles: (Click on the job title to view job vacancies for government and private sector jobs.) The USAJOBS selection lists all federal job vacancies for this job series.

 

Landscape Architecture GS-0807

Landscape architects manage, supervise, lead, and/or perform professional landscape architecture work to create, preserve, design, rehabilitate, and provide stewardship for outdoor spaces and land, They may also research, interpret, and conserve historical, cultural, aesthetic, and natural resources, and achieve safe, healthful, efficient, and aesthetically pleasing physical environments (e.g., parks, recreational areas, and public buildings) for human use and enjoyment.

The federal government employs 352 in this series. The Departments of the Interior employs 166 followed by the Department of Agriculture with 97, the Department of the Army with 63 and the Navy Department employs 14.

Landscape architects principally work on projects and activities involved in the alignment and arrangement of sites, land uses, drainage, and vegetation. Landscape architects may work individually and/or with teams of design, construction, and contracting professionals.

They may develop extensive plans, including comprehensive outdoor recreation, urban, regional landscape, land development, ecological, environmental restoration, sustainable development, and water resource recreation plans. This work requires knowledge of environmental and ecological compliance laws and policies and the requirements of ecosystems.

Landscape architecture requires both the art of site and landscape design and skill in applying the science of architecture to site elements and materials

Job Series Titles: (Click on the job title to view job vacancies for government and private sector jobs.) The USAJOBS selection lists all federal job vacancies for this job series.

USAJOBS GS-0807

 

Architecture GS-0808

Architects manage, supervise, lead, and/or perform professional architecture work involving the art and science of conceptualizing, planning, developing, and implementing designs, They ensure that buildings and structures are responsive to human activities and needs, are structurally sound and permanen, and economical to acquire, operate, and maintain.

The federal government employs 1,839 architects of which 81 work overseas. The Departments of the Army, Navy and Air force employ 1,000 civilians followed by the General Services Administration (GSA) with 181, and the Interior Department with 132. There are architects employed at most of the cabinet level agencies and in a few large independent agencies.

Architects typically collaborate with others on all phases of planning, designing, and constructing a project, from initial discussions with the client to the completion of the project.

The practice of architecture emphasizes the art and science of designing structures as distinguished from the practical skills principally associated with construction activities. The architect merges the needs of society with aesthetic values.

Architects design a wide variety of structures and complexes (e.g., medical centers, campuses, prisons, and industrial parks). Their work may specialize in one function or cover the whole process from conception through post-occupancy usage. Architects use computer-aided design and drafting technology to create and produce design documents or may render sketches and drawings by hand.

Job Series Titles: (Click on the job title to view job vacancies for government and private sector jobs.) The USAJOBS selection lists all federal job vacancies for this job series.

USAJOBS GS-0808

 

 

 

 

 

Construction Control Technical GS-0809

This series covers technical positions supervising, leading, or performing work involving on-site inspection of construction or monitoring and control of construction operations. Positions in this occupation require applying:

  • practical knowledge of engineering methods and techniques;
  • knowledge of construction practices, methods, techniques, costs, materials, and equipment; and
  • ability to read and interpret engineering and architectural plans and specifications.

The federal government employs 1,736 construction control representatives of which 90 work overseas. The Department of the Army is the largest employer with 57 civilians followed by the Department of the Air Force with 154 and the General Services Administration with 143. Most cabinet level agencies and a few large independent agencies employ construction control representatives.

Construction control inspector positions deal primarily with reviewing materials, work methods, and workmanship to ensure each part of the structure is built in accordance with the plans and specifications. They:

  • review and become familiar with the construction plans and specifications;
  • inspect all electrical, mechanical, civil, and architectural materials and equipment delivered to the construction site to ensure they meet specifications;
  • observe work and work methods to ensure the structure is being built in accordance with the plans and
    acceptable work practices;
  • inspect work in progress and upon completion to ensure an acceptable level of workmanship;
  • interview contractor employees to ensure labor laws and regulations are observed;
  • observe worksite and work activity to ensure safety standards are maintained; and
  • maintain a daily log of the project, recording facts concerning work activity, workforce, equipment in use,
    inspection activities, accidents, visitors, weather conditions, and unusual happenings.

Construction control representative positions ensure adequate inspection and also control or monitor construction operations.

Job Series Titles: (Click on the job title to view job vacancies for government and private sector jobs.) The USAJOBS selection lists all federal job vacancies for this job series.

 

Civil Engineer GS-0810

Civil engineering work involves the generation and/or application of theories, principles, practical concepts, and processes related to:

  • the science of civil engineering (including its materials, methods, systems, industry codes, and procedures) and the other traditional engineering science disciplines (e.g., mechanical, electrical, chemical);
  •  the art, techniques, and engineering design standards for the building, transportation, public works, and construction industries;
  •  physical science disciplines (e.g., physics, chemistry, and materials science), advanced mathematics, and social science disciplines (e.g., economics and community planning); and
  •  critical inquiry and scientific methodology.

The federal government employs 10,977 civil engineers of which 291 work overseas. The Department of the Army, Navy and Air Force are the largest employer with 6,923 civilians followed by the Department of Transportation with 1,406 and the Department of Interior with 919. There are smaller numbers employed by many other agencies including the DOE, GSA, NASA and others. 

Civil engineers typically provide advisory services in the planning and design process, and engineering management services for design, construction, sustainment, and decommissioning projects. Civil engineers interpret design documents and oversee the proper execution of construction work. Civil engineers are also involved in original and applied research activities conducted in laboratory settings or for organizations primarily concerned with testing, technology transfer activities, materials and instrumentation development, and modeling and computational analysis.

Job Series Titles: (Click on the job title to view job vacancies for government and private sector jobs.) The USAJOBS selection lists all federal job vacancies for this job series.

Environmental Engineer GS-0819

The work involves the generation and/or application of theories, principles, practical concepts, processes, and systems related to:

  • environmental engineering and the traditional engineering science disciplines (e.g., chemical, civil, electrical, mechanical);
  • environmental engineering design standards, codes, and practices;
  • advanced mathematics and economics;
  • biological and physical science disciplines; and
  • critical inquiry, problem solving, and scientific methodology.

Environmental engineering work emphasizes mitigation or remediation of harmful environmental effects, recycling and recovery of natural resources, and ensuring public health and safety. The work also concerns ecology or the quality of the environment. These engineers work with diverse aspects of water, land, or air pollution.

The federal government employs 3,927 environmental engineers of which 108 work overseas or in the U.S. Territories. The Department of the Army, Navy and Air Force are the largest employers with 1,770 civilians followed by the EPA with 1,671, HHS 82, Department of Energy 52, with small numbers employed at the DOT, VA, Homeland Security and the Department of Commerce.

Environmental engineering in the Federal Government also encompasses a variety of unique work situations, such as:

  • harbor, river, navigation, reservoir, and dam management;
  • Federal land management;
  • nuclear and other energy resource management;
  • alternative energy development; and
  • management of Federal facilities.

Job Series Titles: (Click on the job title to view job vacancies for government and private sector jobs.) The USAJOBS selection lists all federal job vacancies for this job series.

 

Mechanical Engineer GS-0830

This series covers positions managing, supervising, leading, and/or performing professional engineering and scientific work:

  •  involving the design, development, commission, manufacture, operation, maintenance, and disposal of mechanical devices and systems and their equipment and/or components; and
  • concerning the principles of motion, energy, force, and material properties to ensure mechanical devices and systems and their equipment and/or components function safely, reliably, efficiently, and economically.

Mechanical engineering work involves the generation and/or application of theories, principles, practical concepts, systems, and processes related to:

  • the science of mechanical engineering (e.g., design, fluid dynamics, manufacturing processes, machine design, thermodynamics, and heat transfer), design standards, industry codes, and techniques;
  • traditional engineering science disciplines (e.g., civil, electrical, and chemical); and
  • advanced mathematics, physical science disciplines (e.g., physics, chemistry, and materials science), environmental science, and social science disciplines (e.g., economics).

The federal government employs 12,262 mechanical engineers of which 90 work overseas. The Department of the Army, Navy and Air Force are the largest employers with 10,855 civilians followed by the Department of Transportation with 131, and NASA with 117. All large cabinet level agencies employ small numbers of mechanical engineers except for the Department of Education and HUD. 

Mechanical engineers use a variety of materials and the physical laws governing them to produce mechanical systems and devices useful to societies and industries. The devices and systems are designed to function in a particular environment and/or under a wide range of conditions. Mechanical engineering contributes to the daily and extraordinary needs of societies, industries, and Government, and to new and extended theoretical knowledge and understanding of physical phenomena.

Job Series Titles: (Click on the job title to view job vacancies for government and private sector jobs.) The USAJOBS selection lists all federal job vacancies for this job series.

 

Industrial Nuclear Engineer GS-0840

This series covers positions managing, supervising, leading, and/or performing professional engineering and scientific work involving processes, instruments, and systems used to generate and/or control nuclear energy and radiation. The work relates directly to:

  • nuclear reactors, other nuclear systems and their support systems, instruments, and equipment;
  • planning and design activities for specialized equipment and process systems of nuclear facilities;
  • protection of the public from hazardous radiation produced by nuclear reaction processes; and
  • harnessing nuclear energy for a wide variety of uses.

The federal government employs 3,052 industrial engineers. The Department of the Navy is the largest employers with 2,395 civilians followed by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission with 368 and the Department of Energy with 248. Seventeen are employed by the Department of the Air Force.

Job Series Titles: (Click on the job title to view job vacancies for government and private sector jobs.) The USAJOBS selection lists all federal job vacancies for this job series.

 

Electrical Engineering GS-0850

This series covers positions managing, supervising, leading, and/or performing professional engineering and scientific work concerned with:

  •  utilizing and exploring electrical and electronic phenomena and the motion, emissions, conduction, and behavior of electrical energy currents;
  • designing electrical equipment, components, or systems; and
  •  generating and transmitting electrical energy in an efficient manner.

The federal government employs 5,905 electrical engineers of which 59 work overseas. The Department of the Army, Navy and Air Force are the largest employers with 3,412 civilians followed by the Department of Energy with 522, and NASA with 302. All large cabinet level agencies employ small numbers of electrical engineers except for the Department of Education and the Justice Department. 

Electrical engineers are concerned with the practical application of electricity. They design and develop electrical equipment and systems, including broadcast and communications systems, electric motors, machinery controls, lighting and wiring, radar and navigation systems, and power generating, controlling, and transmission devices. Electrical engineers design new products, write performance requirements, and develop maintenance schedules. They also test equipment, solve operating problems, and estimate the time and cost of engineering projects.

Electrical engineers who support construction projects develop electrical designs and prepare construction drawings and specifications for electrical systems and equipment. They may perform work involving overhead and underground electrical distribution; interior lighting and power; street and floodlights; airfield night and navigational lighting; electrical generator installations for critical facilities and structures; electrical installations for dams and other civil works projects; communication and signal circuits; cathodic protection; and intrusion detection systems.

Job Series Titles: (Click on the job title to view job vacancies for government and private sector jobs.) The USAJOBS selection lists all federal job vacancies for this job series.

 

Computer Engineering GS-0854

This series covers positions managing, supervising, leading, and/or performing professional engineering and scientific work involving the design, construction, and operation of computer systems, including hardware and software and their integration.

Computer engineering work involves the application of engineering and scientific theories and principles to complex computer-based systems. Computer engineers devise software to integrate a number of devices (e.g., systems, equipment, application programs, and components) into a computer system. They also design firmware defining the behavior of a system.

The federal government employs 4,585 computer engineers of which 13 work overseas. The Department of the Army, Navy, Air Force and the DOD are the largest employers with a combined 3,412 civilians followed by NASA with 830, and the Department of Transportation with 80. The majority of large cabinet level agencies employ small numbers of computer engineers.

Job Series Titles: (Click on the job title to view job vacancies for government and private sector jobs.) The USAJOBS selection lists all federal job vacancies for this job series.

 

Electronics Engineering GS-0855

This series covers positions managing, supervising, leading, and/or performing professional engineering and scientific work involving electronic circuits, circuit elements, equipment, systems, and associated phenomena concerned with electromagnetic or acoustical wave energy or electrical information for purposes such as communication, computation, sensing, control, measurement, and navigation.

The federal government employs 18,988 electronics engineers of which 83 work overseas. The Department of the Army, Navy, Air Force and the DOD are the largest employers with a combined 16,374 civilians followed by the Department of Transportation with 807, and NASA with 801. Several other agencies also employ small numbers of electronics engineers.

Electronics engineering involves the generation and/or application of theories, principles, practical concepts, processes, and systems related to:

  •  the science of electronics engineering and the traditional engineering science disciplines (e.g., mechanical and chemical;
  • physical science disciplines (e.g., chemistry and physics);
  •  advanced mathematics, computer science, and economics.

Electronics engineers research, develop, test, evaluate, operate, maintain, decommission, and/or direct the fabrication, manufacture, and installation of electronic devices and they analyze and study performance requirements against an array of diverse considerations.

Job Series Titles: (Click on the job title to view job vacancies for government and private sector jobs.) The USAJOBS selection lists all federal job vacancies for this job series.

 

Electronics Technician GS-0856

 

This series covers technical positions supervising, leading, or performing work involving applying:

  • knowledge of the techniques and theories characteristic of electronics, such as a knowledge of basic electricity and electronic theory, algebra, and elementary physics;
  • knowledge of electronic equipment design, development, evaluation, testing, installation, and maintenance; and
  • knowledge of the capabilities, limitations, operations, design, characteristics, and functional use of a variety of types and models of electronic equipment and systems related to, but less than, a full professional knowledge of electronic engineering.

The federal government employs 8072 electronics technicians of which 222 work overseas. The Department of the Army, Air Force and Navy are the largest employers with ,5368 civilians followed by The Department of Justice with 806 and the Department of Transportation with 537.  Many cabinet level agencies and a few large independent agencies such as NASA employ electronics technicians.

Electronics technicians may have gained experience assisting in work situations including:

Maintenance - Developing maintenance standards and procedures for use by others. Analyzing repair practices and developing procedural instructions for use by others on methods and steps to repair equipment.
Installation - Planning and directing the installation of complex systems and associated facilities, particularly where there are site selection and construction problems, dealings with contractors and public utilities, and the possible need to modify equipment for novel site characteristics.

Fabrication - Designing and analyzing circuits, determining design feasibility, evaluating equipment performance under varying environmental conditions, and collecting performance data. Designing or modifying designs to achieve performance and cost objectives. Evaluating the adequacy of equipment for such purposes as repair, calibration, and testing.

Testing and Evaluation/Research and Development - Developing or evaluating new or modified electronic systems. Completing testing, evaluating data, and determining acceptability of equipment modifications, validity, test procedures and data, or legality of operation. Technicians support professional engineers in performing experiments, research, and developmental activities requiring an in-depth knowledge of technical engineering methods, applications, practices, and principles to work on concepts, prototypes, and experimental projects that are without precedent and support state-of-the-art research.

Sustainment - Developing, performing, evaluating, or modifying calibration and test equipment, systems, and procedures. Reporting, analyzing, and archiving test data. Performing complex calculations and manipulations of test data to improve performance of systems, instrumentation, measurement standards, techniques, and procedures.

Troubleshooting - Analyzing and diagnosing faults in the operational configuration of electronic systems and equipment. Interpreting circuit wiring, logic cable diagrams, drawings, specifications, and schematics of complete systems and equipment to understand the function and interconnections of the various assemblies and troubleshoot the system.

Technical Work Involves:

  • developing and designing test and repair equipment, analyzing repair practices, or developing procedural instructions on methods and steps of equipment repairs;
  • developing maintenance standards and procedures, testing and evaluating new or modified systems, or analyzing the compatibility of interlocking components and systems;
  • planning and directing the installation of complex systems and associated facilities, particularly where there are problems of site selection and construction;
  • designing and analyzing circuits, determining feasibility of these designs, evaluating equipment performance under varying environmental conditions, collecting data, or designing or modifying designs to achieve performance and cost objectives; and
  • developing or evaluating new or modified systems or monitoring frequency emissions by licensed stations.

Review the official qualification standard for qualifying education and or training. 

Job Series Titles: (Click on the job title to view job vacancies for government and private sector jobs.) The USAJOBS selection lists all federal job vacancies for this job series.

 

Biomedical Engineering GS-0858

This series covers positions managing, supervising, leading, and/or performing professional engineering and scientific work exploring and using biotechnology to:

  •  enrich practices, techniques, and knowledge in the medical, physiological, and biological sciences;
  • enhance and ensure the health, safety, and welfare of living (i.e., human and animal) systems; and
  • create and improve designs, instrumentation, materials, diagnostic and therapeutic devices, artificial organs, medical systems, and other devices (e.g., systems, equipment, application programs, and components) needed in the study and practice of medicine with living systems.

The federal government employs 848 biomedical engineers. The Veterans Administration is the largest employer with 368 followed by the Department of Health and Human Services with 360 and the Department of the Army with 44. A few work for other agencies such as the DOD and Air Force.

Bioengineering and biomedical engineering work necessitates extensive research and collaboration to exchange and utilize engineering expertise with scientists and medical providers with the goal of exploring and devising practices, concepts, and theories impacting health, safety, and quality of life.

Job Series Titles: (Click on the job title to view job vacancies for government and private sector jobs.) The USAJOBS selection lists all federal job vacancies for this job series.

 

Aerospace Engineering GS-0861

This series covers positions managing, supervising, leading, and/or performing professional engineering and scientific work concerning the integration of the aeronautics and astronautics sciences within the broad arena of aviation and space exploration. It includes related materials, equipment, systems, applications, and components.

The aerospace engineering science discipline involves:

  •  increasing the knowledge and understanding of the aeronautical and astronautical sciences and their applications in aviation and space exploration;
  • improving manned and unmanned commercial, defense, and business aviation technology; and
  • creating, developing, testing, launching, operating, maintaining, remodeling, and decommissioning aeronautical vehicles and structures.

The federal government employs 9,292 aerospace engineers of which 15 work overseas. The Department of the Army, Navy, Air Force and the DOD are the largest employers with a combined 4,273 civilians followed by NASA with 4,180, and the Department of Transportation with 792. Only one other agency employs this group, the NTSB has 25 employees.  

The work requires knowledge of areas such as aerodynamics, aeroacoustics, astro-dynamics, computational fluid dynamics, fluid mechanics, flight dynamics, flight structures, thermodynamics, flight propulsion, and energy conversion and use.

Aerospace engineering involves the understanding, visualization, analysis, design, and operation of aerospace vehicles and structures operating within, above, and beyond the earth's atmosphere. The work includes: production, fabrication, operation, type certification, and/or maintenance of aerospace vehicles or integrally associated equipment. It also includes positions involved in investigating phenomena encountered in aerospace flight, monitoring and analyzing unknown or unfamiliar aerospace vehicles, piloting aerospace vehicles, and developing aviation safety standards and regulations.

Aerospace vehicles can be manned or unmanned and range from helicopters and other vertical take-off aircraft to high-speed spacecraft and space stations traveling to the atmospheres of earth, outer space, and other planets. Each kind of aerospace vehicle possesses unique characteristics, including its speed regime, flight environment, operational regime, and specific research, analysis, design, and operational problems.

Job Series Titles: (Click on the job title to view job vacancies for government and private sector jobs.) The USAJOBS selection lists all federal job vacancies for this job series.

 

Petroleum Engineering GS-0881

This series covers positions managing, supervising, leading, and/or performing professional engineering and scientific work involved in the discovery and recovery of oil, natural gas (e.g., methane, ethane, propane, and butane), and helium. The work includes:

  •  exploration and development of oil and natural gas fields;
  •  production, transportation, and storage of petroleum, natural gas, and helium;
  •  investigation, evaluation, and conservation of these resources;
  •  regulation of the transportation and sale of natural gas;
  •  valuation of production and distribution facilities for tax, regulatory, and other purposes; and
  •  research on criteria, principles, methods, and equipment involved in exploration and development activities.

The federal government employs 352 petroleum engineers. The Department of the Interior employs 317, the Department of Energy 14, and the Treasury Department 13. Only three agencies employ this occupation.

Petroleum engineering work involves the generation and/or application of theories, principles, practical concepts, processes, and methods related to the science of petroleum engineering. This includes traditional engineering science disciplines (e.g., civil, mechanical, electrical, and chemical), engineering design, techniques and practices. Petroleum engineers use advanced mathematics and economics and physical science disciplines to solve problems through scientific methodology.

Job Series Titles: (Click on the job title to view job vacancies for government and private sector jobs.) The USAJOBS selection lists all federal job vacancies for this job series.

Navel Architecture GS-0871

This series covers positions managing, supervising, leading, and/or performing professional architectural, engineering, and scientific work relating to:

  • the form, strength, stability, performance, and operational characteristics of marine structures and waterborne vessels; and
  • all types of naval crafts and ships operating on, below, and just above the sea surface

The federal government employs 919 navel architects. The Department of the Navy employs 854 civilians in this occupation and the Department of Homeland Security employs the remaining 51. Only two agencies employ this occupation.

Naval architecture is concerned with ship design as a whole, and not with the internal design of pieces of equipment placed in or on the ship.

Naval architecture work involves ship design and calculations for existing ships being altered (by means of conversion, rebuilding, modernization, or repair) and for new ships. Naval architects determine the principal dimensions of the vessel in collaboration with ship operators or others who specify performance requirements. Once this determination has been made, naval architects prepare the preliminary ship design with the delineation of the lines, the displacement and stability calculations, general arrangement plans, weight calculations, and strength calculations. After the preliminary design is completed, the work involves building a physical model or models (particularly for new forms).

Job Series Titles: (Click on the job title to view job vacancies for government and private sector jobs.) The USAJOBS selection lists all federal job vacancies for this job series.

 

Mining Engineering, GS-0880

This series covers positions managing, supervising, leading, and/or performing professional engineering and scientific work to explore, remove, and transport raw metals, nonmetallic minerals, and solid fuels from the earth. Mining engineering work involves:

  • a variety of mineral substances to include metal ores; nonmetallic minerals; and solid fuels and energy sources;
  • working with mining systems, including underground mining; surface mining; solution mining; and placer mining; and
  • traditional mining activities, including the heavy construction industry (involving rock excavation and support for highways, tunnels, dams, power stations, and underground chambers) and exploration and development of mineral deposits located under large bodies of water.

The federal government employs 132 in this occupation of which 52 work for the Department of the Interior, 42 for the Department of Labor, and 27 for HHS. A few work for other agencies.

Mining engineering work involves the generation and/or application of theories, principles, practical concepts, processes, and systems related to:

  • the science of mining engineering including:
  • fluid mechanics, thermal analysis, and engineering mechanics;
  • rock mechanics, mineral economics, coal characteristics, and mineral processing principles;
  • mine safety, mine surveying and exploration, and mine ventilation;
  • mining power and drainage systems; and
  • land reclamation;
  • mining engineering design and its specific standards, codes, techniques and practices;
  • advanced mathematics and economics;
  • physical sciences (e.g., physics, chemistry, geology, metallurgy, materials science, and materials testing); and
  • critical inquiry, analytical reasoning, problem solving, and scientific methodology.

Mining engineers typically use geologic knowledge, highly sensitive instruments, and computational analyses to resolve issues, conditions, and problems involved in the development, production, and transportation of a mineral body. Their work in processing minerals emphasizes the efficient, economical, and safe separation of minerals from mined materials, and includes restoring the land to a useful condition after mining processes are completed.

Mining engineering work includes raw material production, as well as modern construction projects, underground openings for weapons systems and nuclear waste disposal, and land reclamation activities. They may specialize in the mining of one mineral or metal (e.g., tin and gold), or in a particular emphasis (e.g., quarry, explosives, research, equipment, processing, and environmental concerns).

In the Federal Government, mining engineers typically engage in one or more of the following activities:

  • administering laws regulating the mining and leasing of public, Native American, and acquired lands containing mineral deposits;
  • conducting studies and investigations to promote development and effective utilization of mineral deposits; or
  • original and applied research directed toward the overall improvement of mining systems and components.

Job Series Titles: (Click on the job title to view job vacancies for government and private sector jobs.) The USAJOBS selection lists all federal job vacancies for this job series.

 

Agricultural Engineering GS-0890

This series covers positions managing, supervising, leading, and/or performing professional engineering and scientific work resolving agricultural issues, problems, and conditions arising from the production and processing of food and fiber materials and management of natural resources in rural locales.

The federal government employs 325 agricultural engineers of which all work for the Department of Agriculture

Agricultural engineering work involves the generation and/or application of theories, principles, practical concepts, processes, and systems related to:

  •  the science of agricultural engineering;
  •  traditional engineering science disciplines (e.g., mechanical, civil, electrical, and chemical);
  •  engineering design codes, techniques, and practices to aid in the solution of agricultural and farming needs such as structures, equipment, systems, and processes;
  •  physical science disciplines (e.g., physics, chemistry, and materials science);
  •  advanced mathematics and social science disciplines (e.g., economics and community planning); and • critical inquiry, analytical reasoning, problem solving, and scientific methodology.

Agricultural engineers utilize agronomy and engineering, and physical sciences and technologies to improve the quality of rural and urban life through natural resources management and the production and distribution of food and fiber materials. These engineers, in collaboration with the farming industry and rural communities, explore and resolve issues, conditions, and problems impacting agricultural and natural resources.

Job Series Titles: (Click on the job title to view job vacancies for government and private sector jobs.) The USAJOBS selection lists all federal job vacancies for this job series.

 

Chemical Engineer GS-0893

This series covers positions managing, supervising, leading, and/or performing professional engineering and scientific work involving:

  •  chemical processes utilized by industries and scientific technologies to produce useful products and systems; and
  • the use of mass, momentum, and energy transfers together with thermodynamics and chemical kinetics to explore, extend, improve, and provide for existing and potential chemical and biochemical conversion processes. This

The federal government employs 1,142 chemical engineers. The Department of the Army, Navy, Air Force and the DOD are the largest employers with a combined 804 civilians followed by the EPA with 106, the Commerce Department with 54 and the Department of Homeland Security with 51. NASA employs 28.   

Chemical engineering work involves the generation and/or application of theories, principles, practical concepts, processes, and systems related to the science of chemical engineering and chemistry.

Chemical engineers in the Federal Government are also engaged in a variety of functions such as research, development, production, pilot-plant operation, testing, weapons development, risk assessment, environmental protection, post-accident investigations, energy conversion, healthcare delivery systems, process controls, pharmaceuticals, electronics, and policy guidance for regulatory compliance.

Job Series Titles: (Click on the job title to view job vacancies for government and private sector jobs.) The USAJOBS selection lists all federal job vacancies for this job series.

 

Industrial Engineering Technical, GS-0895

This series covers technical positions supervising, leading, or performing technical work related to industrial engineering. Industrial engineering technicians plan, design, analyze, improve, and install work systems comprised of employees, materials, and equipment, for use in producing products, rendering services, repairing equipment, or moving and storing supplies and equipment. The work typically involves studies of engineered time standards, methods engineering, layout designs of work centers, control systems, materials handling, or manpower utilization. The work requires knowledge of, and skill in applying, the principles and techniques of industrial engineering and practical knowledge of pertinent industrial and related work processes, facilities, methods, and equipment.

The federal government employs 974  Industrial Engineering Technicians of which 2 work overseas. The Department of the Army, Air Force and Navy are the largest employers with 965 civilians followed by the Department of Justice with 6 and the VA with one.

Industrial engineering technicians advise management in the areas of:

  • planning and organizing – effective organizations, standards, methods, systems, procedures, work flow, materials handling, and cost and control systems;
  • facilities layout – arranging machines, equipment, processes, and service areas into efficient and economical operating systems;
  • plant design – designing new buildings or altering existing buildings to provide for new or improved processes and functions;
  • industrial production planning – evaluating requirements for items to be produced, advising on production capability of contractors and Government-owned facilities, and production planning, to include systems, machinery, equipment, products, work methods, procedures, and standards; or
  • industrial standards – evaluating systems for reliability based on statistical control charts, acceptance sampling, and process capability analysis.

Industrial engineering programs are found primarily in industrial establishments, such as shipyards, ordnance plants, arsenals, and aircraft overhaul and repair facilities. Programs of this type are also found in supply depots, research and development centers, and public works organizations.

Industrial engineering involves applying scientific methods in systematic studies of the organization and the accomplishment and improvement of work efforts. Studies typically involve planning, fact-finding, analyzing and evaluating data, reaching conclusions, preparing recommendations, gaining acceptance, and installing changes. The techniques applied are based largely on the mathematical, statistical, and engineering concepts of contemporary industrial management. These studies determine more economical and efficient ways to produce products or render services. Effective utilization of available resources is a primary objective.

Work assignments of industrial engineering technicians may range from simple data collection in a limited phase of a study to responsibility for a major phase of an overall study, such as preproduction development of work methods for the manufacturing of a prototype model. More typical are assignments in which the technician specializes in one or more phases of industrial engineering work, such as establishing engineered time standards, conducting method improvement studies, or designing work center layouts.

Regardless of the functional activity, industrial engineering technicians characteristically prepare comprehensive written reports containing their recommendations and supporting data. They participate in marketing their ideas for change to management. Even those who specialize in a single phase of industrial engineering are systems-oriented. They plan, design, improve, analyze, and install integrated systems of personnel, materials, and equipment. The various parts combine to create an integrated work system.

Review the official qualification standard for qualifying education and or training.

Job Series Titles: (Click on the job title to view job vacancies for government and private sector jobs.) The USAJOBS selection lists all federal job vacancies for this job series.

 

Industrial Engineering GS-0896

This series covers positions managing, supervising, leading, and/or performing professional engineering and scientific work to determine, evaluate, predict, and advise on effective ways for an organization to use its production factors (i.e., people, equipment, materials, information, and energy) to make or process a product or provide a service.

The federal government employs 1,216 industrial engineers. The Department of the Army, Navy, Air Force and the DOD are the largest employers with a combined 1,038 civilians followed by the VA with 100, the DOT with 23,and 15 work for the Treasury Department.

Industrial engineering work concerns the design, measurement, analysis, evaluation, and control of production and service operations and systems, and their associated management processes. These engineers examine and design the integration of people, information, equipment, automation methods, and materials to achieve optimum quality and productivity in the performance of operating systems. Their activities typically include such areas as production planning and control; quality and management control systems; financial planning and cost analyses; inventory, equipment, warehouse, and materials management; simulations and mathematical modeling; manufacturing systems; and work station design

Job Series Titles: (Click on the job title to view job vacancies for government and private sector jobs.) The USAJOBS selection lists all federal job vacancies for this job series.

 

Astronauts GS-801-11/14 (NASA)

 

NASA, the world's leader in space and aeronautics is seeking outstanding scientists, engineers, and other talented professionals to carry forward the great discovery process that its mission demands. Creativity. Ambition. Teamwork. A sense of daring. And a probing mind. That's what it takes to join NASA, one of the best places to work in the Federal Government. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has a need for Astronaut Candidates to support the International Space Station (ISS) Program and future deep space exploration activities.

  • Title: Astronaut Candidate
  • Location: Houston, TX
  • Salary: $66,026.00 to $144,566.00 / Per Year

Duties

Astronauts are involved in all aspects of assembly and on-orbit operations of the ISS. This includes extravehicular activities (EVA), robotics operations using the remote manipulator system, experiment operations, and onboard maintenance tasks. Astronauts are required to have a detailed knowledge of the ISS systems, as well as detailed knowledge of the operational characteristics, mission requirements and objectives, and supporting systems and equipment for each experiment on their assigned missions. Long-duration missions aboard the ISS generally last from 3 to 6 months. Training for long duration missions is very arduous and takes approximately 2 to 3 years. This training requires extensive travel, including long periods away in other countries training with our international partners. Travel to and from the ISS will be aboard the Russian Soyuz vehicle. Consequently, astronauts must meet the Soyuz size requirements, as indicated below. Additional information about the position can be found at Astronaut Candidate Program.

Job Series Titles: (Click on the job title to view job vacancies for government and private sector jobs.) The USAJOBS selection lists all federal job vacancies for this job series.

 

Engineering Qualifications (All Occupations)

 

Basic Requirements: Degree: professional engineering. To be acceptable, the curriculum must: (1) be in a school of engineering with at least one curriculum accredited by the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET) as a professional engineering curriculum; or (2) include differential and integral calculus and courses (more advanced than first-year physics and chemistry) in five of the following seven areas of engineering science or physics: (a) statics, dynamics; (b) strength of materials (stress-strain relationships); (c) fluid mechanics, hydraulics; (d) thermodynamics; (e) electrical fields and circuits; (f) nature and properties of materials (relating particle and aggregate structure to properties); and (g) any other comparable area of fundamental engineering science or physics, such as optics, heat transfer, soil mechanics, or electronics.

Combination of education and experience -- college-level education, training, and/or technical experience that furnished (1) a thorough knowledge of the physical and mathematical sciences underlying professional engineering, and (2) a good understanding, both theoretical and practical, of the engineering sciences and techniques and their applications to one of the branches of engineering. The adequacy of such background must be demonstrated.

Review the official Engineering Qualifications Standard for additional information.