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Page updated 5/5/2015

 

This group includes positions which involve administering, managing, supervising, performing, or supporting education or training work when the paramount requirement of the position is knowledge of, or skill in, education, training, or instruction processes.

There were 32,380 federal workers employed in this group within most of the Executive Branch departments, and in some large and small independent agencies, over 1,000 are employed overseas. The largest employers of this group are the military departments that hire civilians at their bases stateside and overseas. Others work for most of the large departments including 924 with the Department of Interior, and 1,600 with the Department of Defense.

Don't overlook any agency in your job search as there are positions available in many agencies.

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Job Listings Click on the job title for current job listings and click on (job series definition) to review duties and qualifications.

 

 

Job Series Definitions

These position descriptions are excerpted from the qualification standards for select job titles in this group. In the General Schedule position classification system is established under chapter 51 of title 5, United States Code. The term “General Schedule” or “GS” denotes the major position classification system and pay structure for white collar work in the Federal government. Agencies that are no longer subject to chapter 51 have replaced the GS pay plan indicator with agency-unique pay plan indicators. For example, the Bureau of Prisons uses GL instead of the GS designation. For this reason, reference to General Schedule or GS is often omitted from the individual qualification standard sheets. 

A brief introduction for major occupations within this group is provided below.

General Education and Training Series, GS-1701

 

This series includes positions that primarily involve professional work in the field of education and training when the work is not more appropriately covered by another professional series in this or any other group. Included are positions where (1) the work has characteristics that may be identified with more than one professional education series with none predominant, (2) the combination of professional knowledge required by the work is not specifically covered by another series, or (3) the work is in a specialized professional field not readily identifiable with other existing series in this or any other group.

The federal government employs 14,026 in this occupation. The Department of the Army, Navy and Air Force employ over 5300 civilians in the series. The VA has 166 while the Department of Defense has 7,489 of which 7,174 work overseas or in the US Territories.  The remaining are employed by the other organizations including most of the cabinet level agencies.

This series covers education and training positions that primarily require full professional knowledge of a subject field not covered by another established series in either the Education Group, GS-1700, or any other occupational group. This includes instructors in college or equivalent level programs, when the area of expertise is in a subject matter field not classifiable to an established series, and when no other series is more appropriate, e.g., instructors of English, instructors of foreign language.
This series is not intended as a replacement for or an alternative to any of the professional series in the Education Group, GS-1700. It is intended for use only when already existing professional series do not provide adequate coverage for education and training work.

This may occur when the education or training work of the position

  • involves a combination of characteristics not specifically provided for or identifiable with other series in the Education Group;
  • requires knowledge of two or more academic disciplines with none predominant; or
  • requires professional knowledge of a specialized field not covered by an existing series.

Typical Job Titles for this series: (Excerpted from recent GS-1701 job announcements)
(Click on the job title to view job vacancies)

 

Education and Training Series, GS-1702

 

This series includes positions that involve nonprofessional work of a technical, specialized, or support nature in the field of education and training when the work is properly classified in this group and is not covered by a more appropriate series. The work characteristically requires knowledge of program objectives, policies, procedures, or pertinent regulatory requirements affecting the particular education or training activity. Employees apply a practical understanding or specialized skills and knowledge of the particular education or training activities involved, but the work does not require full professional knowledge of education concepts, principles, techniques, and practices.

The federal government employs 7,632 in this occupation. The Department of the Army, Navy and Air Force employ over 4,300 civilians in the series. 954 work for the Department of the Interior and the Department of Defense has 829. There are 1,041  employees that work overseas or in the US Territories. All of the cabinet level agencies with the exception of The Department of Education hire employees in the series.

Positions in this series involve nonprofessional education or training work not covered by another established series in the Education Group, GS-1700. The series covers primarily one grade interval aid and technician positions, but it may also cover a few two grade interval positions involved in quasi-professional work.

Typical Job Series Titles: (Excerpted from recent GS-1702 job announcements)
(Click on the job title to view job vacancies)

 

Education and Vocational Training Series, GS-1710

This series includes positions that require applying full professional knowledge of the theories, principles, and techniques of education and training to instructional and educational administration work in education programs operated by Federal agencies. Some positions also require specialized knowledge of one or more subjects in which the instruction is given.

The federal government employs 5,887 in this occupation. The Department of Defense is the largest employer with 3,163 workers followed by the Department of the Interior with 1163. The Department of Justice has 644 and you will find this series at other organizations including many of the cabinet level agencies.

This series covers positions that involve direct delivery of instruction or training services of a professional nature. It covers classroom teachers, supervisors, and managers in Government-operated schools at the elementary and secondary levels. It also covers managerial and staff positions that involve directing or advising on the operation of groups of such schools.

Teaching involves organizing material for effective presentation, motivating students, and reinforcing learning. The teaching process may become complicated by problems, such as

  • differences in background, culture, or language;
  • previous educational neglect or academic failure;
  • social maladjustment; or
  • mental or physical handicaps

Typical Job Series Titles: (Excerpted from recent GS-1710 job announcements)
(Click on the job title to view job vacancies)

 

Training Instruction Series, GS-1712

 

This series covers positions concerned with administration, supervision, training program development, evaluation, or instruction in a program of training when the paramount requirement of the work is a combination of practical knowledge of the methods and techniques of instruction and practical knowledge of the subject-matter being taught.

Positions in this series do not have either a paramount requirement of professional knowledge and training in the field of education, or mastery of a trade, craft, or laboring occupation.

The federal government employs 9,213 in this occupation. The Department of the Army, Navy and Air Force employ over 6,600 civilians in the series. All cabinet level agencies employ workers in this series including the DOD with 559, Homeland Security with 421 and the State Department with 277.

This series covers positions involved in the direct delivery of instruction or training services of a nonprofessional nature. It covers classroom instructors, supervisors, and managers in Government-operated training programs. This series also covers nonprofessional training program staff specialists engaged in course development, test development, or similar staff work. Some positions are involved in training in military or civilian occupational specialties such as radar or communications equipment operation. Other positions may involve instruction in subjects not specifically related to developing occupational skills such as courses in security regulations or freedom-of-information procedures. Some positions in this series may be found in a secondary school setting (e.g., shop training) or in a comparable setting.

Typical Job Series Titles: (Excerpted from recent GS-1712 job announcements)
(Click on the job title to view job vacancies)

 

Vocational Rehabilitation Series, GS-1715

This series covers positions requiring the application of knowledge of training programs and occupational information in relation to vocational rehabilitation problems of the physically or mentally disabled, or of other individuals whose background or lack of job skills impairs their employ ability. The work involves planning training programs for these individuals; placing them in gainful employment; and supervising them while in training and during adjustment to the job. The duties require knowledge of vocational training concepts and practices; of the employment market; of training facilities; and of skill demands and environmental conditions in occupations and in specific jobs in relation to their suitability for the training and employment of the persons served by the rehabilitation program. The work also involves the application of counseling techniques and methodology in motivating these individuals and helping them to adjust successfully to the training or work situation; however, full professional counseling knowledge is not required.

The federal government employs 941 in this occupation. The VA is the largest employer with 884, a few work for the Labor Department and Department of Agriculture. Several other agencies hire small numbers in this series.

The primary functions of the vocational rehabilitation specialist in the total vocational rehabilitation process are to find and provide suitable training and placement services for the individual served by the rehabilitation program, and to supervise the individual and follow through during the period of his training and job adjustment.

Providing training services involves ascertaining the training requirements to meet the training objective; coordinating with various resources in finding, evaluating, and selecting a training facility* in the community that will be specifically suitable from the standpoint of the particular needs and problems of the individual; and setting up and negotiating for a training program that will meet his needs. They are responsible for such aspects as entering the individual into training; prescribing the number of hours; determining whether the program needs adjustment in the light of progress of the individual, and arranging for adjustment of the training content in certain situations, or interrupting or discontinuing the training of the individual, if deemed necessary; determining when supplemental or remedial education is needed, and arranging for such training.

Providing placement services involves finding suitable employment opportunities or keeping up day-to-day contacts with employers, placement people, and others, and keeping alert for job and small business opportunities. Placing the individual involves a program of informed selling. This typically requires that the specialist overcome the more common employer objections to hiring the handicapped. He must convince the employer that, instead, he will be hiring a qualified person who can fill the employer's needs. This may also involve persuading the employer to make certain modifications in the work situation in order to accommodate to the individual's particular handicap.

Once the individual has been placed in training or employment, his successful adjustment to the situation will often be the determining factor as to whether the training facility or employer will accept other handicapped workers in the future. The vocational rehabilitation specialist helps, counsels, and guides the individual over the rough spots in his adjustment to the job or while in training; helps the employer or training facility to understand the nature of the individual's disability without at the same time jeopardizing the individual's position as an able rather than disabled worker; and particularly recognizes when complications in the individual's adjustment are serious enough to merit the attention of one or more of the team of professional "specialists," e.g., psychologist, social worker.

Typical Job Series Titles: (Excerpted from recent GS-1715 job announcements)
(Click on the job title to view job vacancies)

 

Education Program Series, GS-1720

This series covers professional education positions that involve promoting, coordinating, and improving education policies, programs, standards, activities, and opportunities in accordance with national policies and objectives. Positions in this series primarily involve the performance, supervision, or formulation and implementation of policy concerning education problems and issues. These positions require a professional knowledge of education theories, principles, processes, and practices at early childhood, elementary, secondary, or post secondary levels, or in adult or continuing education. They also require a knowledge of the Federal Government's interrelationships with State and local educational agencies or with public and private postsecondary institutions.

The federal government employs 654 in this occupation. The Department of Education employs 308 while the VA employs 120.  Several other agencies hire small numbers in this series.

Positions in this series are concerned with the establishment of and leadership in education programs, policies, and activities. Their responsibilities cover a number of major goals and efforts.

  •  To help the education community apply promising solutions to problems in particular settings;
  • To equalize education opportunities for groups and individuals who are at a disadvantage because of economic, racial, or geographic conditions, or because of physical or mental handicaps; and
  • To improve the quality and relevance of education through research, development, experimentation, demonstration, dissemination, and training.

    Education program specialists function within a framework of laws, policies, and program philosophy that sets forth the general outlines of the Federal Government's role in education.

This Federal role is difficult to define precisely because of conditions, such as:

  • the tremendous scope, complexity, and diversity of the activities involved and their impact on the future of society and the lives of students, parents, teachers, and taxpayers;
  • the often controversial and sensitive nature of social and economic issues, e.g. equal education opportunity, racial/sex equality; and
  • the historical and present relationships between the Federal Government and State and local governments and the private sector in this nation's highly decentralized educational structure.

Typical Job Series Titles: (Excerpted from recent GS-1720 job announcements)
(Click on the job title to view job vacancies)

 

Education Research Series, GS-1730

This series includes positions that primarily involve professional education research work. This includes the performance, leadership, management, or supervision of scientific research to solve educational problems or to develop new knowledge bearing on educational processes. The paramount requirements for this work are knowledge of and skill in applying research principles and methods and a broad and thorough knowledge of one or more scientific fields or interdisciplinary areas related to the education research work being performed.

The federal government employs 107 in this occupation. The Department of Education employs 86 while the DOD employs 7.  Several other agencies hire small numbers in this series.

Education research analysts foster, fund, and/or perform educational research, i.e., the systematic investigation and solution of critical problems affecting what and how individuals learn. The field of education research is broad and varied. It may involve exploration of one or more of the many areas affecting learning and teaching, such as psychological, sociological, organizational, economic, and political. It may focus on learning processes of individuals, methods of teaching, or ways society organizes resources to deliver educational services. The research may be broad or specific depending on the nature of the problems to be solved. Education research is concerned with the total environment affecting what students learn, how they learn it, and what value they place on particular types of knowledge.

In general, education research analysts manage research projects conducted largely through competitive contracts and grants that are problem-oriented, i.e., that respond to the needs and concerns of the education community, Congress, and the public. The research is designed to support a systematic national effort to scientifically examine critical problems, develop and test new ideas and practices, and ensure that the research findings reach those who can make use of them. Other positions involve the actual performance of research. In either case, positions in this series are so deeply involved in the substance of the research effort that the work requires both subject matter knowledge and research skills.

Many problems being studied have defied solution in the past. Education research is further complicated by the sensitive nature of the issues, social values, and attitudes involved; the need to take into account and protect human subjects; and the fact that educational innovations do not behave as reliably and predictably as, for example, agriculture or technical products.

Research positions in this series require a demonstrated knowledge of, and capability to apply, full research methodology. Positions involving only literature searches, or surveys to collect data, or policy analysis should not be considered research positions requiring the application of full research methodology. Research positions are classified in this series rather than other professional series when the following conditions are true:

  1.  the professional research work that is performed or managed has a clear educational purpose;
  2.  the work requires the employee to relate the particular research being conducted to broader issues or concerns in the field of education; and
  3. the position is in a line of career advancement that primarily includes education research rather than work in some other field.

Typical Job Series Titles: (Excerpted from recent GS-1730 job announcements)
(Click on the job title to view job vacancies)

 

Education Services Series, GS-1740

This series includes professional positions the duties of which are to administer, supervise, promote, conduct, or evaluate programs and activities designed to provide individualized career-related or self-development education plans. The work requires knowledge of education theories, principles, procedures, and practices of secondary, adult, or continuing education. Some positions require skill in counseling students or enrollees to establish educational and occupational objectives.

The federal government employs 995 in this occupation. The Department of the Army, Navy and Air Force employ 790 civilians in the series. Several other cabinet level agencies employ workers in this series including the DOD with 20, Homeland Security with 40 and the Department of Agriculture employs 44.

Positions in this series require the application of professional knowledge of education to educational and vocational testing and counseling, and the application of the administrative policies and procedures of the education services program. Employees apply this knowledge in providing guidance and assistance to training program enrollees seeking to develop their full potential by pursuing job-related instruction or self-improvement courses. The work involves furnishing support to programs of general education for adults, including occupational specialty related courses, basic academic courses, and other adult programs. These positions may be found in military organizations, correctional institutions, or other organizations.

Typical Job Titles for this series: (Excerpted from recent GS-1740 job announcements)
(Click on the job title to view job vacancies)

 

Instructional Systems Series, GS-1750

This series includes professional positions the duties of which are to administer, supervise, advise on, design, develop, or provide educational or training services in formal education or training programs. The work requires knowledge of learning theory and the principles, methods, practices and techniques of one or more specialties of the instructional systems field. The work may require knowledge of one or more subjects or occupations in which educational or training instruction is provided.

The federal government employs 2,029 in this occupation. The Department of the Army, Navy and Air Force employ 1,353 civilians in the series. All but two other cabinet level agencies employ workers in this series including the DOD with 167, Homeland Security with 102 and the VA employs 65.

Positions included in this series may be found in any of the following types of settings:

  • programs of education paralleling State elementary and secondary schools, or special education programs;
  • programs of instruction in military or civilian occupational specialties or fields;
  • programs of formal academic and professional education of an undergraduate or graduate level; and
  • programs of general education for particular groups, such as disadvantaged youths or adults.

 

Typical Job Series Titles: (Excerpted from recent GS-1750 job announcements)
(Click on the job title to view job vacancies)