Posted on Saturday, 27th August 2016 by

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The deputy program administrator for USAJOBS announced upgrades to their system that assists applicants with their accounts. A new streamlined account allows applicants to easily view the status of their applications, saved jobs, and searches. Each application is listed as either advancing, paused, or no longer being considered. All of the applicant’s resumes and other documents now reside under the “Documents Section” and they added helpful tips and color coded completion indicators.

There are more changes coming as the program administrator addresses user feedback to improve and streamline the application system for anyone searching for federal jobs. Since USAJOBS was launched it is now much easier to apply for and know the status of your applications and improvements are evident throughout the application process.

The first step for applying for a federal job is to search for federal jobs of interest, printout and review the job announcement, register on USAJOBS and prepare a comprehensive and professional federal style resume and application. USAJOBS helps you throughout the process. View OPM’s video that announces these changes.

Applying for Federal Jobs

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Posted in Applying For Jobs, Federal Jobs, Job Vacancies

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Posted on Wednesday, 24th August 2016 by

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Printing Jobs 

This article features the engraver (WG-4413) and platemaker (WG-4416) Printing Family occupations that are responsible for how money is actually made.

There are 1,051 federal workers employed in the WG-4400 Printing Family of which 560 work for the Government Printing Office according to OPM’s Employment Data Base of March 2016. The Department of the Treasury employs an additional 434 employees in the WG-4400 Family. Small numbers are also employed by the Department of Agriculture, Department of Justice, Social Security and a few others. There are a small number of engravers and a total of 16 plate makers currently employed in these occupations.

The majority of the Bureau of Engraving and Printing (BEP) jobs are located in Washington, D.C. or Fort Worth Texas. The BEP is under the Department of the Treasury.

Other printing occupations include: (The number of employed is listed in parentheses after the occupational title)

  • Bindery Work WG-4401 (173)
  • Miscellaneous Printing and Publishing WG-4402 (206)
  • Letterpress Operating WG-4403 (176)
  • Offset Photography WG-4410 (4)
  • Offset Press Operating WG-4417 (80)
  • Bookbinding WG-4441 (61)
  • Electrolytic Intaglio Plate Making WG-4449 (21)
  • Intaglio Press Operating WG-4454 (144)

In this article we interviewed three highly skilled Bureau of Engraving and Printing (BEP) employees;  William Fleishell, a picture engrave, Kenneth Kipperman, a journeyman picture engraver, and Kenneth Garner, a platemaker, all three work in Washington, D.C. You can learn more about how money is made on the Bureau of Printing web site.

Q&A with William Fleishell

William Fleishell,is a picture engraver for the Bureau of Engraving & Printing located in Washington, DC.

 

William Fleishell, BEP Picture Engraver

William Fleishell, BEP Picture Engraver

Why did you become an engraver?

In 1988 I applied and interviewed for the job of Apprentice Picture Engraver with an art portfolio review. Previously, I had been to art school and was working as a free-lance artist helping my father with his own art business. I was also going to school to study medical illustration. Being a printmaking major, as well as a painter and sculptor in art school, I had an understanding of line drawing and had always worked on intricate and highly traditional drawings that were very similar to engravings. I had done etching and had even had experience with gravers before starting at BEP, but nowhere near the level of bank note engraving. It seemed to be a perfect fit for my abilities and background. In addition to this, I came from a family where familiarity with printing arts was common and seen as a viable occupation.

What is the most interesting project you have worked on as an engraver?

That is hard to say. I suppose, over the years, working on the various portraits of dignitaries has been the most interesting work I have done. I’m trained as a portrait artist and making engraved portraits is what I feel I that can do best. Over the past 28 years I have had the opportunity to engrave many bank note style portraits of living people, and have had all sorts of experiences working on these projects. One of the most interesting projects was working on the portrait of Chief Justice John Roberts. It was an arduous process and it took a long time to make this project happen; but in the end, the hard work and efforts were justified and the result worked to his satisfaction.

What is a typical day for an engraver?

Throughout the day I work on various traditional and digital engraving projects and stock work. When required, I also work on plate inspection and repair, conduct specialized tour visits, do training, and, at times, assist the apprentices with their work.

Would you recommend an engraver as a good occupation to pursue?

It all depends on the personal temperament of the person and their ability as a professional artist. This is not a business that just anyone can walk into. You have to bring to the table an already established set of sophisticated skills that are seldom seen even in traditional art schools. Therefore, finding a candidate for this type of work can take years. If an aspiring artist has the ability to focus and concentrate, the ability and patience to sit with the same art job for months and months on end, an inherent ability to be critical with extremely high standards, and a sense of stability whereby one would be capable of staying in the same place and job for many decades—then yes, indeed I would recommend this job to that artist. But through the years, I have met only a very tiny handful of people of who fit that description.

Q & A with Kenneth Kipperman

Kenneth Kipperman is a journeyman picture engraver for the Bureau of Engraving and Printing located in Washington DC.

 

 

Kenneth Kipperman, BEP Engraver

Kenneth Kipperman, BEP Engraver

Why did you become an engraver?

In my early years I won a number of art scholarships. I was then trying to find anything in the field of art. I answered an ad in the New York Times newspaper. The American Banknote Company, the leader in Security printing around the world, was interested in interviewing people for the Picture Engraving apprenticeship. I submitted my portfolio and was accepted for the 10-year picture engraving apprenticeship.

What is the most interesting project you have worked on as an engraver?

The most interesting project I’ve worked on was the portrait of Alexander Hamilton that appears on our $10 bill.

What is a typical day for an engraver?

Currently I’m working on an engraving of a naval battle scene. At a moment’s notice, I may also be asked to inspect and repair master plates, altos, and printing plates. I also help my coworkers any way I can in traditional hand engraving, plate repair, and tool making.

Would you recommend an engraver as a good occupation to pursue?

Yes. There are many styles of engraving, but I find hand engraving, as an occupation, to be the most rewarding and challenging in this digital age.

Qualifications of an engraver

The standard for engravers is at one grade level which is a WG-10, and the salary is $62,011.00. You must be a U.S. citizen to apply to be an engraver.

The following information from the Federal Wage System Job Grading Standard for Negative Engraving, 4413 is just a partial list of skills necessary to be an engraver.

  • Grade 10 negative engravers perform the full range of tasks of engraving. They interpret job specifications and instructions and organize work assignments such as engraving a complete map or chart, making extensive corrections or modifications to existing charts or reviewing the completed work of other negative engravers as a cross-check against errors or omissions.
  • The negative engravers receive hand compiled manuscripts, including overlays, and plan the procedures to be followed. They analyze and order or prepare photographic manuscript images on scribecote and photographic copy of master projections and grids. They plot and engrave the layout of master projections and grids when required and engrave map or chart features on scribecote to form the final negative.
  • Knowledge of a number of United States and foreign systems of symbology such as topographic and hydrographic symbols to describe a wide range of manmade and natural features in order to select the appropriate symbols for the material to be produced or transcribe publications of foreign origin for United States issuance. Knowledge of various systems of nautical or aeronautical navigation aids, typical positioning of these aids and appropriate symbology.
  • Knowledge of Federal and international agency specifications governing such things as layout of products, line weights required for various purposes, typefaces to be used, and tolerances allowable, in order to comply with the requirements of the various types of projects.
  • Skill in the use of measuring instruments such as dividers, protractors, English and metric scales, and microscopes with calibrated scales in order to accurately position base and overlay negatives for exact registration, assure exact positioning of navigation aids, or check the accuracy of line width.

Our next Question and Answer is with a platemaker Kenneth A. Garner.

Q&A with Kenneth A. Garner

Kenneth A. Garner is a platemaker for the Bureau of Printing and Engraving and located in Washington D.C.

 

Kenneth Garner, BEP Platemaker

Kenneth Garner, BEP Platemaker

Why did you become a platemaker?

As a BEP Machinist, I didn’t have direct involvement in the currency printing process and I was eager to be a part of that process. So, I devoted a number of additional hours to assist with grinding plates, which sparked my interest to become a Plate Maker.

What is the most interesting project you ever worked on as a platemaker?

My most interesting projects were recreating the 1986 State Department (Great Seal) die and working on the new design layout moving from 32-subject plates to 50-subject plates.

What is a typical day like as a platemaker?

A typical day as a Plate Maker is to complete plates from the production order provided in a timely manner. (A full description of plate production can be found at http://www.bep.gov/hmimplatemaking.html).

Would you recommend the job of platemaker as a good career to pursue?

I would definitely recommend obtaining a job as a Platemaker. The pay is great and the high demand to produce currency ensures job security.

Qualifications for Platemaker

The typical grades for a platemaker are from WG-5 to WG-8. You must be a U.S. citizen to apply for this position.

The following information from the Federal Wage System Job Grading Standard for Offset Platemaking, 4416 this is just a partial list of skills necessary to be a platemaker.

Grade 5

  • The grade 5 platemaker follows established procedures to produce line and halftone offset plates (when halftone quality is not a critical requirement) by superimposing photographic negatives or positives onto presensitized or machine coated plates through single flat exposures. The offset plates are used in press operations to produce a variety of printed materials.
  • The grade 5 platemaker must be familiar with the basic techniques and procedures to produce offset plates requiring single flat exposures of halftone and/or line film negatives or positives.

There is no Grade 6 information cited.

Grade 7

  • The grade 7 platemaker uses established procedures for superimposing line, halftone and other images from photographic negatives or positives onto presensitized or machine coated plates through single and double flat exposures to produce offset plates. The offset printing plates are used in subsequent press operations to produce a variety of printed materials.
  • The grade 7 platemaker performs platemaking operations such as single and/or double exposures, which require skill in the alignment of flat(s) to plate, variation in lengths of exposure, the use of screen tints, masking, step and repeat procedures, exposing and developing the plate.

Grade 8

  • In comparison with the single and double-exposure type of platemaking performed by the grade 7 platemaker, the grade 8 platemaker performs single, double and multiple flat exposures requiring hairlines [plus or minus .008 cm (.003 inches)] or critical [plus or minus .003 cm (.001 inches) or finer] alignment tolerances of several separate line and halftone negatives (flats), symbol and tint screens, and film masks and traps to a single plate.
  • Grade 8 platemakers have the ability to read and interpret work orders and the trade knowledge to select proper type of plate, processes, solutions, and equipment to be used.

The engraver and platemaker jobs are very technical and require specialized skills in order to make our paper currency properly. In our final article we will discuss the job occupation of the Research Chemist (GS-1320).

Credit

  • Lydia Washington, Public Affairs Officer, Bureau of Engraving and Printing – DC Facility (Washington, DC)
  • www.bep.treas.gov
  • Photos provided by the Bureau of Printing and Engraving

Helpful Career Planning Tools 

Visit our other informative site

The information provided may not cover all aspects of unique or special circumstances, federal and postal regulations, and programs are subject to change. Our articles and replies are time sensitive. Over time, various dynamic human resource guidance and factors relied upon as a basis for this article may change. The advice and strategies contained herein may not be suitable for your situation and this service is not affiliated with OPM, the postal service or any federal entity. You should consult with school counselors, hiring agency personnel offices, and human resource professionals where appropriate. Neither the publisher or author shall be liable for any loss or any other commercial damages, including but not limited to special, incidental, consequential, or other damages.

Posted in Applying For Jobs, Federal Career Exploration, Federal Employees, Federal Jobs, Job Qualifications, Job Vacancies

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Posted on Monday, 15th August 2016 by

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The Bureau of Engraving and Printing (BEP) designs, prints, and finishes all of the Nation’s paper currency and many other security documents including White House Invitations and military identification cards. They also advise and assist other agencies to produce government documents. This agency is part of the Department of the Treasury. The BEP is also responsible for the printing of security documents in the United States.

 

WASHINGTON D.C. - JUNE 26 2014: United States Bureau of Engravin

This agency has approximately 1,808 employees at two primary locations; Washing, DC and Fort Worth Texas. According to the BEP website, “employment opportunities include, but are not limited to, administrative support, police officers, security specialists, acquisition specialists, chemists, engineers, attorneys – just to name a few.” Other occupations include IT specialists, scientists, machinists, printers, and engravers. The printer and engraver occupations are in the Wage Grade system.

Bureau of  Engraving and Printing 

The United States began printing paper money in 1862 to finance the Civil War. The law of July 11, 1862, authorized notes to be engraved and printed at the Treasury. In 1864 the BEP printed forms for the Treasury, engraved passport plates for the State Department, and numbered money orders for the Post Office.

The Act of March 3, 1877 officially made the BEP the exclusive printer of all U.S. currency and securities. In 1894 the agency also started printing postage stamps and continued doing so until June of 2005.

The BEP designs, engraves, and prints all U.S. paper currency.  In 1996, the agency began creating new designs for our money. This was the most comprehensive overhaul of our currency since the 1860’s. Other government printing services are also provided by the BEP including the printing of Presidential appointment certificates, military identification cards, naturalization documents, Small Business Administration financial documents, Coast Guard water use licenses, Presidential portraits, and vignettes of various Washington, D.C. historical buildings. The agency also is responsible for treasury securities, military commissions, award certificates, invitations and admission cards, and many other types of identification cards, forms and other special security documents for a variety of government agencies. The BEP is the largest producer of security documents for the United States. Incidentally, they do not make coins which are produced by the United States Mint.

Programs and Services

U.S. Currency Reader Program

The BEP has developed an iBill® Talking Banknote Identifier at no cost to eligible blind or visually impaired persons who request one. The iBill® is a currency reader device that provides a convenient means for blind or visually impaired individuals to identify Federal Reserve notes (U.S. currency). Its compact “key- fob” design allows it to be carried in a pocket or purse, clipped to a belt, or attached to a keychain or lanyard. The iBill® is a fast and accurate means to identify all U.S. currency in circulation: $1, $2, $5, $10, $20, $50, and $100.

The BEP provides currency readers, free of charge to all eligible blind and visually impaired individuals. This program has only been in existence since January 2015. To take advantage of this program applications must be submitted along with a competent authority who can verify their eligibility.

Through this program the BEP has developed EyeNote® a free mobile device application for use on the Apple iOS platform. It scans U.S. currency and announces its value back to the user. They also assisted in the development of another currency denominating app called the IDEAL® Currency Identifier. It operates on the Android platform. For information about this program visit this helpful link http://www.loc.gov/nls/.

Services

Redeem Mutilated Currency

Every year the Treasury Department handles approximately 30,000 claims and redeems mutilated currency valued at over $30 million.

Mutilated currency is currency which has been damaged to the extent that: Its condition is such that its value is questionable and the currency must be forwarded to the Bureau of Engraving and Printing for examination by trained experts before any redemption is made. One example of mutilated currency may be bills missing relevant security features.

Currency can become mutilated in any number of ways. The most common causes are: fire, water, chemicals, and explosives; animal, insect, or rodent damage; and petrification or deterioration by burying.

Shredded Currency

You can purchase five pounds of shredded currency through the BEP. These are small amounts, that are pre-packaged souvenirs are available at either their Washington D.C. and the Fort Worth visitor centers.

U.S. Currency Facts

  • Crane and Co., a Massachusetts-based company, has been providing the U.S. Bureau of Engraving and Printing with paper for U.S. currency since 1879.
  • Federal Reserve notes are a blend of 25 percent linen and 75 percent cotton. Currency paper has tiny red and blue synthetic fibers of various lengths evenly distributed throughout the paper.
  • It would take 4,000 double folds, forwards and backwards, to tear a banknote.
  • No matter the denomination, a banknote weighs approximately 1 gram. Because there are 454 grams in one pound, this means there are 454 notes in one pound of currency.
  • Want to measure your notes in a different way? A stack of currency one-mile high would contain more than 14.5 million banknotes.
  • It is estimated that between one-half to two-thirds of the value of all U.S. currency in circulation is outside of the U.S.
  • In 1934, the $100,000 Gold Certificate became the highest denomination ever issued. It was never intended for public use. Instead, it was meant solely for official transactions between Federal Reserve Banks.

Read about federal job listings for more information on credentials needed and how BEP workers impact U.S. currency.

In our next article we will focus on two job occupations engraver (WG-4413) and platemaker (WG-4416).

Credit

  • Lydia Washington, Public Affairs Officer, Bureau of Engraving and Printing – DC Facility (Washington, DC)
  • www.bep.treas.gov

Helpful Career Planning Tools 

Visit our other informative site

The information provided may not cover all aspects of unique or special circumstances, federal and postal regulations, and programs are subject to change. Our articles and replies are time sensitive. Over time, various dynamic human resource guidance and factors relied upon as a basis for this article may change. The advice and strategies contained herein may not be suitable for your situation and this service is not affiliated with OPM, the postal service or any federal entity. You should consult with school counselors, hiring agency personnel offices, and human resource professionals where appropriate. Neither the publisher or author shall be liable for any loss or any other commercial damages, including but not limited to special, incidental, consequential, or other damages.

Posted in Applying For Jobs, Federal Career Exploration, Federal Employees, Federal Jobs, Job Interviews, Job Qualifications, Job Vacancies

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Posted on Tuesday, 2nd August 2016 by

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Writing a private sector or federal style resume using civilian terminology is an important strategy in the job hunting process, especially for veterans. However, it has received too much emphasis from resume writing gurus who are all over the internet. Job-hunting is not a one-step deal, like writing a resume. It is a process in which you define the objective and then devise strategies to accomplish the mission. It is similar to a military operation that all veterans experienced. Objective + Strategies = Operation.

Resume

Before we get into the nuts and bolts of resume writing, here are some general rubrics to guide you through the process.

  • There is nothing sacred about traditional wisdom, which says limit your private sector resume to two pages. Length depends on the depth and breadth of your experience in the military and civilian life beforehand. If you joined the military after college or after working for a few years, and then spent six years in the Marines with multiple deployments, then your story will probably take more than two pages to tell. It’s important to note that a federal style resume can be from 3 to 10 pages or more in length depending on the extent of your background. You must tailor your federal resume to the Job Announcement describing how you achieved the knowledge, skills, and abilities required for the position. If you are applying for a federal job review the sample federal style resume that is posted online.
  • Never use military acronyms. Resumes must be written using civilian terminology. No exceptions. Remember that most hiring managers and human resources directors reading your resume have had no military experience. If they see something on your resume like NAVSPECWORCOM (United States Naval Special Warfare Command), they will shake their heads and possibly trash your resume.
  • Translate your military jobs into civilian terminology. Veterans may have covered this in their Transition Assistance Program (TAP), but to refresh your memory go to www.military.com and www.va.gov and review the job translator pages.
  • Format your resume clearly and precisely. Resist the temptation to get cute and use multiple colors, boxes, charts, etc. Use 12 pt. Times New Roman typeface, the usual format for resumes and other business documents. Place major headings in upper case bold; text in lower case regular type. Under all major headings, list the main points in bullet point format instead of paragraph format. Keep it simple. Keep it clean. For federal job applicants the majority apply online using a resume builder program. It is best to draft your federal resume on your desktop just like you would for a private sector job. This will give you time to thoroughly complete the resume and federal application and cover all of the requirements listed in the job announcement.
  • Your resume must be free from spelling and grammatical errors. No exceptions. If you submit a resume with spelling and grammar errors, it will be trashed even if the company is military friendly. To avoid mistakes, always proofread your resume ALOUD, and then have another person do the same. Always run your document through the spell checker, but remember that it is not infallible. Spell checkers make mistakes and usually they do not read words in context. For example, most spell checkers will not distinguish the difference among two, to, and too.
  • Avoid using broad generalizations. Quantify your experiences. For example, stating a military work experience in general terms like this conveys little to the reader: “Treated a large number of patients at the emergency facility at McGuire Air Force Base.” Quantifying your experience like this will mean much more to the reader: “Treated an average of thirty patients per day over a twelve month period at McGuire Air Force Base.”  This is very important for federal resumes as well as you must describe in detail how you achieved required knowledge, skills, and abilities.
  • The resume alone will not get you a job. A common misbelief is that sending a “dynamite” resume to multiple job boards and career pages, will result in job offers floating down to your desk like manna from heaven. The purpose of the resume is to take you to the next step in the job hunting process; a personal interview with the hiring manager or human resources director.
  • Submit your resume only to a named person with a job title at a named company. For example, address it to “Mr. James Smith. Sales Manager. Boeing Co.” Send your resume to “Job #23” or “Position 46” or “Employment Manager” and you will get a startling result. Nothing. You might as well send it to the third ring of the planet Saturn. How do you learn the name of the person you want to reach? Call the company customer service representative and ask. Ninety-nine percent of the time, you will get the information you need. Alternatively, go to LinkedIn and enter the position title and company name: Sales Manager, Home Depot. Federal resumes and application are typically submitted online through USAJOBS.gov. Keep a copy of the federal job announcement. If you have any questions about the application process or job requirements contact information is provided.   
  • Resume format and style change with the times. Here are the major components of today’s resume. Include all of the following components, in the order listed, because Human Resources Directors and Hiring Managers will be looking for them.

RESUME COMPONENTS

  1. PERSONAL IDENTIFICATION. Begin the resume with your personal identification; name, address, phone number and email address. This goes at the top of the first page with your name in upper case bold. The rest can go in lower case regular type.
  2. SUMMARY OR OBJECTIVE. This is a brief statement of your skills and how they can help the company going forward. It should run no more than ten lines and be written in paragraph format. Think of it as an advertisement for you. When submitting your resume for a specific job use OBJECTIVE. State that you are seeking the job referenced for a specific company as stated on a job description, an internet job board or on a career page. Couch your language in terms that relate to the job requirements. Use SUMMARY if you are submitting your resume to a human resources director for a non-specific job.
  3. MILITARY WORK EXPERIENCE. State your military jobs in civilian terms along with the job location and time period. Itemize your specific responsibilities in bullet point format and quantify as much as possible.
  4. CIVILIAN WORK EXPERIENCE. Use this major heading for any pre or post military civilian job experience. Use the same rubrics you used for Military Work Experience.
  5. AWARDS, RECOGNITION, COMMUNITY SERVICE. List all awards and citations you received for performance or honors going back to high school. List all charitable work you have done in both civilian life and the military.
  6. TECHNOLOGY SKILLS. List all of your technology skills including personal productivity, business and social apps.
  7. TECHNOLOGY AND BUSINESS CERTIFICATIONS. In this section, list in bullet point format all military and civilian online or resident certifications. Include apprenticeship programs, too. Job candidates frequently forget that certifications are an important part of their education history. Potential employers will give you positive marks for earning certifications in areas like web design, accounting, truck and driving and for working in a trade like carpentry.
  8. EDUCATION. Use one line for each school experience dating back to high school. After listing your high school and college experiences, list all professional development courses. Include bricks-and-mortar education and online education as well. And, be sure to include any bilingual training you might have had

These are the components of a clean, succinct resume that will make the hiring manager stop and take a good look at your candidacy. You need not add other major headings like “Hobbies” or “References.” You can work these items into the personal interview.

CRAFTING YOUR DIGITAL PROFILE

A digital profile is an outline of your experiences posted online. There will be online resources that require writing a digital profile. One that comes to mind is LinkedIn, which all job hunters should use. LinkedIn will ask you to provide a digital profile, which is nothing more than an abbreviated resume. Have your resume handy when you write your digital profile and follow it closely. The digital profile should be a reflection of your resume. Both must work in harmony because hiring managers and human resources directors will review both. If there is a discrepancy, they might ask, “Will the real Mike Jones please stand up?”

INDUSTRY SPOTLIGHT

When seeking a civilian job, we frequently limit our horizon to the private sector. There is an alternate job market to explore that is so huge that we refer to it as an industry unto itself.

The Federal, State, Local Government Workplace

There are approximately 22,000,000 (read, 22 million) workers employed by federal, state and local governments, making it the largest “industry” in the USA. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) the federal government employs approximately 2.5 million workers in a variety of jobs at multiple locations throughout the USA and abroad. State governments employ approximately 5,500,000 workers, and local governments employ 14,500,000 workers. Federal government workers make the highest annual average salary, $81,000. The job hunting rubrics are the same for seeking government jobs. However, there are usually strict application procedures that you must follow or risk elimination. These requirements are clearly stated in the application instructions for each government jobs. Follow them to the letter.

Your most valuable guide for job hunting at the federal government level is unquestionably this website, www.federaljobs.net and the book titled “The Book of U.S. Government Jobs: Where They Are, What’s Available and How To Complete a Federal Resume. This book is in its 11th edition and was authored by Dennis Damp a former federal government employee, Air Force veteran and founder of this website.

MOVING FORWARD

Your resume will act as a door opener if you follow our directions carefully. Our advice is based on our experience as an executive recruiter working with hiring managers and human resources directors. For details about writing your resume, an important strategy in the job hunting process, please refer to Chapters 23, 24, 25 in my book, OPERATION JOB SEARCH, A Guide for Military Veterans Transitioning to Civilian Careers. In addition, we suggest that you go to www.military.com to view sample resumes written for military veterans. When you go to the site, click on Veteran Jobs and then click on Transition Center. Next click on Get an Expert Resume. Then click on Sample Resumes, where you will find several well-crafted resumes that will serve as a model for your own resume. While you are on the Sample Resume section, review the samples for cover letters as well.

In our September blog, we will discuss these job hunting skills; how and where to find potential employers. Our Industry Spotlight will focus on the Medical and Education Industries.

TAKEAWAYS

  • Crafting a resume is just one step in the job hunting process.
  • Submit a resume only to a named person with a job title in a named company.
  • Your resume must be free from spelling and grammatical mistakes.
  • Write your resume in civilian language.
  • The purpose of a resume is to advance your candidacy to the next step, a personal interview.

VETERAN’S RESOURCES

Print and eBooks

Helpful Career Planning Tools 

Visit our other informative site

The information provided may not cover all aspects of unique or special circumstances, federal and postal regulations, and programs are subject to change. Our articles and replies are time sensitive. Over time, various dynamic human resource guidance and factors relied upon as a basis for this article may change. The advice and strategies contained herein may not be suitable for your situation and this service is not affiliated with OPM, the postal service or any federal entity. You should consult with school counselors, hiring agency personnel offices, and human resource professionals where appropriate. Neither the publisher or author shall be liable for any loss or any other commercial damages, including but not limited to special, incidental, consequential, or other damages.

Posted in Applying For Jobs, Federal Jobs, Job Interviews, Job Qualifications, Job Vacancies, Resumes / KSAs

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Posted on Friday, 22nd July 2016 by

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Physicians & Medical Specialist Jobs with the Army

Positions are now available for those who want to pioneer innovative medical techniques while caring for Soldiers and their families in some of the world’s most renowned facilities.

Army Physicians receive competitive pay, full benefit package, generous paid time off, educational opportunities, career advancement, and the opportunity to provide uniquely challenging and fulfilling care to those in need.

Currently there are over 180 job openings at facilities nationwide and overseas. Current openings include:

  • 62 physicians
  • 50 nurses
  • 15 practical nurses
  • 9 psychologists
  • 13 physician assistants
  • 6 rehabilitation therapy assistants
  • 4 medical technologists
  • 3 physical therapists
  • 2 nursing assistants
  • 3 diagnostic radiological technologists
  • 1 pharmacist
  • 1 audiologist /speech pathologist
  • 2 dental assistants
  • 3 social workers
  • 1 respiratory therapist
  • 2 pharmacy technician
  • 1 orthotist and prosthetist
  • 1 veterinarian

There are over 330,000 Army Civilians that aren’t active duty military. They serve as an integral part of the Army team to support the defense of our nation. You can become part of their global family by providing quality, world class health care throughout the U.S., Europe and the Pacific. Medcell recruits Medical Professionals for the United States Army.

Take a closer look at their current openings: http://medcell.army.mil/currentjobs.aspx (Applications accepted on USAJOBS.)

Healthcare Careers (Federal Government) 

Applying for Federal Jobs

Visit our other informative site

The information provided may not cover all aspects of unique or special circumstances, federal and postal regulations, and programs are subject to change. Our articles and replies are time sensitive. Over time, various dynamic human resource guidance and factors relied upon as a basis for this article may change. The advice and strategies contained herein may not be suitable for your situation and this service is not affiliated with OPM, the postal service or any federal entity. You should consult with school counselors, hiring agency personnel offices, and human resource professionals where appropriate. Neither the publisher or author shall be liable for any loss or any other commercial damages, including but not limited to special, incidental, consequential, or other damages.

Posted in Applying For Jobs, Civil Service Tests, Federal Jobs, Job Qualifications, Job Vacancies

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Posted on Tuesday, 19th July 2016 by

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Department of Homeland Security Job Openings

DHS is seeking qualified candidates to fulfill mission-critical job openings within Cyber, Information Technology, and Human Resources. Join them for the DHS Technology Job Fair at the Omni Shoreham Hotel in Washington, DC, on July 27 and 28!

The DHS plans to make hundreds of on-the-spot conditional job offers at the upcoming job fair to fill mission-critical roles across the Department. They are seeking out the best and brightest computer scientists, engineers, analysts, mathematicians, problem solvers, and innovative thinkers.

The DHS offers rewarding work in Cyber, Information Technology, and Human Resources and they need your expertise in Cloud Infrastructure and Services, Agile Development, and Mobile Technologies.

They are hiring for grades GS-09, GS-11, GS-12, GS-13, GS-14, and GS-15. Salaries for these grades in the DC Metro area range from $53,435 to $160,300. Candidates must be U.S. citizens and able to obtain/maintain a Secret up to a Top Secret/SCI security clearance based upon position requirements.

The following announcements are open for this exciting event:

  1. Information Technology Specialist (INFOSEC), GS-2210-09/11. Apply at USAJOBS.
  2. Information Technology Specialist (INFOSEC), GS-2210-12/13/14. Apply at USAJOBS.
  3. Information Technology Specialist (INFOSEC), GS-2210-15. Apply at USAJOBS.
  4. Management and Program Analyst, GS-0343-12/13/14. Apply at USAJOBS.
  5. Human Resources Specialist, GS-0201-09/11/12. Apply at USAJOBS.

How to Apply

Attendees of the DHS Technology Job Fair are strongly encouraged to apply for vacancies prior to attending the event.

Fill out an application(s) on USAJOBS. Create or update your personal profile, upload your resume, and apply for one or more of the job announcements through USAJOBS. The online job application deadline is July 29, 2016.

Interview. If you apply by July 20, 2016, and meet the requisite qualifications for the role, you will receive an invitation from DHS for a specific interview slot at the job fair event on July 27-28. The invitation will provide important instructions and requirements for any additional information that should be brought to the interview. If you apply, but are not invited to interview, you are still welcome to attend the event, and your application will be maintained until January 28, 2017. The vacancy announcement will be open through July 29 should you choose to apply after attending the event, but you are not guaranteed the same expedited interview process.

Get hired! If selected, you will receive a conditional job offer on the spot and start your security clearance process the same day!

Helpful Career Planning Tools 

Visit our other informative site

The information provided may not cover all aspects of unique or special circumstances, federal and postal regulations, and programs are subject to change. Our articles and replies are time sensitive. Over time, various dynamic human resource guidance and factors relied upon as a basis for this article may change. The advice and strategies contained herein may not be suitable for your situation and this service is not affiliated with OPM, the postal service or any federal entity. You should consult with school counselors, hiring agency personnel offices, and human resource professionals where appropriate. Neither the publisher or author shall be liable for any loss or any other commercial damages, including but not limited to special, incidental, consequential, or other damages.

Posted in Applying For Jobs, Civil Service Tests, Federal Career Exploration, Federal Jobs, Job Interviews, Job Qualifications, Job Vacancies, Law Enforcement jobs

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Posted on Sunday, 17th July 2016 by

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Air Traffic Controller Jobs

The National Airspace System (NAS), managed by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), is designed to safely and efficiently move air traffic cross country and at terminal facilities. The FAA staffs 22 Air Route Traffic Control Centers (ARTCCs), over 150 Terminal Radar Approach Control Facilities (TRACONs) and Air Traffic Control Towers (ATCTs) located at major airports throughout the country and U.S. Territories. This vast network ensures the safe operation of commercial and private aircraft in the United States and international airspace assigned to U.S. control.

Air traffic controllers coordinate the movement of aircraft to maintain safe separation in air and on the ground at terminal facilities. They also coordinate all ground traffic at FAA ATCT airports including vehicles used by airport authorities, airlines, fire equipment, and system specialists that must have access to airport runways for maintenance and various other purposes.

Their primary and immediate concern is safety however they must also work efficiently to minimize delays. Some regulate airport traffic through designated airspaces; others regulate airport arrivals and departures.

The FAA hires air traffic controllers as retirements occur or individuals leave for other reasons or are promoted and leave the active controller workforce. The Bureau of Labor Statistics projects an increase from 18,739 controllers today to 22,400 by 2022. The median salary is $122,950 a year or $59.11 per hour. Air traffic controllers and other FAA employees are in a core compensation pay band system instead of the competitive service’s General Schedule (GS) pay system. The job series preface is FG instead of the GS you typically see on the USAJOBS.GOV site. New hires without prior air traffic control experience must be 30 years of age or younger.

There are three paths to employment one of which is passing the Air Traffic Selection and Training Aptitude Test (AT-SAT).  This test is an eight-hour computer based pre-employment test that is used by the FAA to measure aptitude required for entry-level air traffic control specialist positions.

Interview with Danielle Richards (Day in the life of an air traffic controller)

 

Danielle Richards - ATC

Danielle Richards – ATC

Danielle Richards began her career in 2008 when she reported to the FAA Academy in Oklahoma City to begin training to become an air traffic controller. After training, she reported to the FAA ATCT at LaGuardia Airport in New York. She completed on-the-job training and became a Certified Professional Controller at LaGuardia Tower. Richards later transferred to the Potomac Terminal Radar Approach Control (TRACON) in Virginia in 2012. She recently returned to LaGuardia Tower as an Operations Manager. Her job series is FG- 2152, however, air traffic employees are not in the traditional grade structure for federal employees, the pay band is KJ.

Why did you become an Air Traffic Controller? 

The truth is I knew nothing about air traffic control. My father had a friend who had a friend who was a controller, and that’s how I found out about it.   The application test was open to the general public back in 2007 and 2008. My father persistently was asking me, “did you apply yet” that finally convinced me to take the test. Little did I know that it would be the best decision that my father convinced me to make!

What are some of the unique aspects of being an Air Traffic Controller?

Air Traffic Control is unique. The air traffic control community is much smaller than you might think. Before I became an air traffic controller, I never met anyone in the field. Now it seems like controllers are everywhere. Every time I meet a new controller, they either know, worked with, or have heard of someone I know.

You have to love air traffic and be respectful of the great responsibility you have been given. People who don’t even know who you are trust you, and in many cases they don’t even know what controllers really do. Pilots and the flying public trust controllers despite the fact that they will never see you or meet you. It is very humbling when you think about it.

Air Traffic is never a one-person show. Everyone works together to get the job done. You build a trust with your co-workers that is critical. One more thing, timing is everything. You wouldn’t believe it, but in air traffic even a second or two makes a difference in the efficiency of your flight.

What are some of the challenges you face being an Air Traffic Controller?

A challenge that we face on a day-to-day basis is making quick decisions. There is no time for indecisiveness. Another challenge is that you are constantly multi-tasking. You have to focus on what you are doing while listening to another controller giving you instructions or information. However, the biggest challenge that I face is not taking the job home with me. If you think about all of the people’s lives that you touch in a day, a week or a year it can become overwhelming.

Are there any dangerous aspects involved with being an Air Traffic Controller?  

Air travel is the safest mode of transportation. Safety is the top priority of every air traffic controller.

Would you recommend this as a good job occupation to for a prospective job applicant? 

I would absolutely recommend this as a great occupation. If you want a career that is challenging and rewarding, that uses your strengths and develops your weaknesses; if you want to grow personally and professionally and have a career that you can be proud of doing every day, then Air Traffic Control is what you are looking for.

Air Traffic Controller’s Basic Requirements

The Department of Labor’s Occupational Outlook Handbook (OOH) specifies the following basic requirements for this position.

To become an air traffic controller, an applicant must

  • Be a U.S. citizen
  • Have a bachelor’s degree, or work experience, or a combination of education and experience totaling 3 years
  • Pass medical and background checks
  • Achieve a qualifying score on the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) pre-employment test, which includes a biographical assessment
  • Pass the Air Traffic Standardized Aptitude Test (AT-SAT)
  • Complete a training course at the FAA Academy (and start it before turning 31 years of age)

The AT-SAT is an 8-hour, computer-based exam. Some of the characteristics tested include arithmetic, prioritization, planning, tolerance for high intensity, decisiveness, visualization, problem solving, and movement detection.

Controllers also must pass a physical exam each year and a job performance exam twice per year. In addition, they must pass periodic drug screenings.

Air Traffic Controller’s Job Description (FG-2152)

NOTE: The following information is excerpted from OPM’s GS-2152 job series qualification standards. Air Traffic controllers are in the excepted service and their core compensation pay bands are different than the standard GS pay scales listed here. The FAA assigns a pay band to each of these levels and the corresponding pay is derived from their pay tables. The job series preface is FG for the FAA.  Use this information to understand the qualification requirements from entry level to a full performance air traffic controller.

Qualifications - Excerpted from opm.gov.

General Experience for GS-4 and GS-5

Progressively responsible experience that demonstrated the potential for learning and performing air traffic control work. Two years of such experience is required for GS-4 positions, and 3 years is required for GS-2152-5 positions.

Specialized Experience (GS-7 and above)

Experience in a military or civilian air traffic facility that demonstrated possession of the knowledge, skills, and abilities required to perform the level of work of the specialization for which application is made. This experience must have provided a comprehensive knowledge of appropriate air traffic control laws, rules, and regulations.

Examples of specialized experience include:

For Station Positions: Providing information to pilots on such matters as weather, air routes, navigational aids, and airport conditions before and during flight. This specialization also requires:

  • Judgment to select only essential and pertinent information from a great mass of data;
  • Skill to present essential information to pilots clearly, concisely, and quickly before or during flight; and
  • Ability to act decisively in emergency situations.

For Terminal Positions: Issuing control instructions and advice to pilots in the vicinity of airports to assure proper separation of aircraft and to expedite their safe and efficient movement. This specialization also requires:

  • Ability to act decisively under stressful situations and to maintain alertness over sustained periods of pressure;
  • Skill to coordinate plans and actions with pilots and other controllers; and
  • Judgment to select and take the safest and most effective course of action from among several available choices.

For Center Positions: Controlling aircraft operating enroute along the airways to assure proper separation and safe and expeditious movement of such aircraft. This specialization also requires:

  • Skill to control aircraft operating at very high speeds over great distances;
  • Skill to arrange air traffic in patterns that assure maximum safety and minimum delay at points where such aircraft are “handed off” or transferred to other facilities or other sectors within the center; and
  • Judgment to estimate when and where traffic congestion will build to a point that necessitates changing patterns, and to plan accordingly.

For Research and Development Positions: Experience in a terminal, station, or center that demonstrated the ability or potential to:

  • Create, design, and/or develop new air traffic control systems or concepts; and
  • Analyze, test, and evaluate current or new air traffic control procedures, methods, systems, or concepts.

For Combination Positions: Positions involving a combination of the duties of two or more specializations require that applicants meet the qualification requirements for the appropriate specializations.

Up through GS-7, specialized experience in one specialization is fully qualifying for reassignment or promotion into another specialization. At GS-9 and above, experience and training in one specialization is qualifying for another specialization if the applicant’s total background indicates that he or she can gain the knowledge, skills, and abilities required in the new assignment after a reasonable period of orientation and training. All positions at the full performance level of each specialization require skill and training in the work of the specialization.

For all specializations, qualifying specialized experience must have provided the ability to:

  • Arrive quickly at well-reasoned solutions to complex problems;
  • Adjust quickly to different assignments, changing conditions, and workload fluctuations;
  • Remain calm and controlled during and after long periods of tension and fatigue; and
  • Speak rapidly, clearly, and distinctly.

Level of Experience: For each grade level, creditable experience must have equipped applicants with the knowledge, skills, and abilities to perform the full range of duties of the position for which application is being made. Such experience is typically demonstrated by accomplishment of assignments of the difficulty and responsibility described in the position classification standard used to evaluate positions at the next lower grade level in the normal line of promotion to the position being filled.

Education

For GS-5 Positions: A full 4-year course of study leading to a bachelor’s degree meets the requirements for GS-5.

For GS-7 Positions: Superior academic achievement at the baccalaureate level or 1 full year of graduate study meets the requirements for GS-7.

Alternate Requirements for GS-7 Positions

Applicants who pass the written test qualify for GS-7 if they:

  • Hold or have held an appropriate facility rating and have actively controlled air traffic in civilian or military air traffic control terminals or centers;
  • Hold or have held an FAA certificate as a dispatcher for an air carrier;
  • Hold or have held an instrument flight rating;
  • Hold or have held an FAA certificate as a navigator or have been fully qualified as a Navigator/Bombardier in the Armed Forces;
  • Have 350 hours of flight time as a copilot or higher and hold or have held a private certificate or equivalent Armed Forces rating;
  • Have served as a rated Aerospace Defense Command Intercept Director; or
  • Meet the requirements for GS-5 and pass the written test with an appropriately higher score.

Maximum Entry Age

Under the provisions of 5 U.S.C. 3307, a maximum entry age has been established for Terminal and Center positions.

Test Requirements

Applicants for competitive appointment and inservice placement to all positions in this series at GS-7 and below must pass a written test. A written test may also be required for positions above GS-7.

Personal Qualities

In addition to meeting all other requirements, applicants must demonstrate possession of the traits and characteristics important in air traffic control work. Applicants who qualify in the written test and/or meet the experience and training requirements will be required to appear for a pre-employment interview to determine whether they possess the personal characteristics necessary for performance of air traffic control work.

Additional Screening Requirements

Applicants who have passed the written test (and the interview, if required) may be required to pass additional air traffic control aptitude screening for positions in the Department of Transportation, Federal Aviation Administration. Persons who do not pass the aptitude evaluation testing requirements will not be appointed to these positions.

Training Requirements

At all trainee and developmental levels, employees must learn the skills needed for operation at higher levels of responsibility. Failure of employees to meet training requirements for or accept promotion to higher grade air traffic control specialist positions may constitute grounds for reassignment, demotion, or separation from employment.

Certificate and Rating Requirements

Air traffic control specialists in all specializations must possess or obtain, within uniformly applicable time limits, the facility ratings required for full performance at the facility where the position is located.

Applicants must possess or obtain a valid Air Traffic Control Specialist Certificate and/or Control Tower Operator Certificate, if appropriate. These certificates require demonstrating knowledge of basic meteorology, basic air navigation, standard air traffic control and communications procedures, the types and uses of air navigation aids, and regulations governing air traffic.

Facility ratings require demonstration of a knowledge of the kind and location of radio aids to air navigation, the terrain, the landmarks, the communications systems and circuits, and the procedures peculiar to the area covered by the facility.

Medical Requirements

In general, air traffic control specialist applicants and employees must have the capacity to perform the essential functions of these positions without risk to themselves or others. The provision of sufficient information about physical capacity for employment requires that before appointment applicants undergo appropriate pre-employment physical/medical evaluations.

In our final article in our series on the FAA we will interview an airway transportation systems specialist (GS-2101).

Credit

  • Arlene Salac, Public Affairs Officer, Washington, D.C.
  • FAA website: http://www.faa.go v
  • Photos provided by the FAA

Additional Resources

Helpful Career Planning Tools 

Visit our other informative site

The information provided may not cover all aspects of unique or special circumstances, federal and postal regulations, and programs are subject to change. Our articles and replies are time sensitive. Over time, various dynamic human resource guidance and factors relied upon as a basis for this article may change. The advice and strategies contained herein may not be suitable for your situation and this service is not affiliated with OPM, the postal service or any federal entity. You should consult with school counselors, hiring agency personnel offices, and human resource professionals where appropriate. Neither the publisher or author shall be liable for any loss or any other commercial damages, including but not limited to special, incidental, consequential, or other damages.

Posted in Applying For Jobs, Civil Service Tests, Federal Career Exploration, Federal Employees, Federal Jobs, Job Interviews, Job Qualifications, Job Vacancies

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Posted on Wednesday, 13th July 2016 by

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Writing a Federal Resume

Many federal job applicants are unaware of the requirement to provide a detailed federal style resume with their application. The federal style resume is typically 3 to 10 pages or more compared to the one page private sector version. The best qualified are selected for interviews and to make that cut you must provide detailed supportive information that confirms your qualifications for the position. Basically, you must provide a work history that highlights what you did in your prior work history to achieved the knowledge, skills, and abilities (KSAs) required for the job.

The key to landing a federal job is tailoring your federal resume to the job announcement, now called the Job Opportunity Announcement (JOA). OPM is offering free (online) hour and a half long briefings to explain each section of the JOA to help applicants identify the right job. According to OPM, “These presentations highlight a 3 part process to assist applicants in writing their Federal resume. Attendees will be shown a real JOA and walked through reviewing the JOA to determine qualifications and interest, identifying the important requirements and then tailoring their resumes with that JOA. Lastly, it will provide a quick overview of the resume builder on USAJOBS.”

The agenda, meeting dates, and times are available on OPM’s web site. Four sessions are initially scheduled for July 28 and 29. Registration is limited to 1500 participants. Other dates will be announced on USAJobs so visit their site frequently if you would like to attend a session.

There are professional services available if you need assistance that provide a free review of your background, previously prepared documents, and job announcement. Those who can put their thoughts on paper logically and have the time to tailor their federal resume to the JOA are able to complete their application on the USAJobs resume builder. Our federal resume sample will help you focus on the task at hand. I suggest completing your federal resume off line on your desktop first. Simply copy and paste what you compiled on your desktop into the resume builder after spell checking and taking your time to compose your resume. Too many rush through the process on the resume builder leaving out key information and the final document may have typos and spelling errors.

If you are interested in a federal job take advantage of OPM’s online virtual briefings and research the process to ensure your application includes the supporting information required to be rated “Best Qualified” for the position.

Helpful Career Planning Tools 

Visit our other informative site

The information provided may not cover all aspects of unique or special circumstances, federal and postal regulations, and programs are subject to change. Our articles and replies are time sensitive. Over time, various dynamic human resource guidance and factors relied upon as a basis for this article may change. The advice and strategies contained herein may not be suitable for your situation and this service is not affiliated with OPM, the postal service or any federal entity. You should consult with school counselors, hiring agency personnel offices, and human resource professionals where appropriate. Neither the publisher or author shall be liable for any loss or any other commercial damages, including but not limited to special, incidental, consequential, or other damages.

Posted in Applying For Jobs, Federal Career Exploration, Federal Jobs, Job Qualifications, Job Vacancies

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Posted on Tuesday, 5th July 2016 by

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Federal Job Hunting Process

Seeking a new job is a multi-faceted process, not merely a one-step event where you construct a resume and send it to hundreds of Internet job boards and company career pages. Many veterans make this common mistake. It costs them dearly in time and adds to the frustration of entering the civilian workforce. There is a better way and we will help you work through it.

 

Job Hunting is a Process

Job Hunting is a Process

DEFINING THE PROCESS

Job-hunting is a process, or operation, which has two parts.

  1. Defining an objective.
  2. Designing strategies to accomplish the objective or mission.

First, let’s concentrate on defining the objective; what kind of civilian work you want to do. To do so, you must first learn who you are. Street wisdom might tell you that discovering who you are is a lengthy task that involves counseling by a psychologist or career coach. It sounds like a daunting task, one that many veterans have neither the time nor inclination to undertake. There is a better way, one that you can do on your own and achieve remarkable results.

GETTING STARTED

All you need is pen and paper, or your digital tools like an iPad or similar, to record your thoughts. Begin by recording, from highest to lowest, the the five things that interest you most. Here is an example.

My Interests

  1. Architecture.
  2. Environmental matters.
  3. Technology, particularly social media.
  4. Financial investing.
  5. Building things.

Now list five things that you are good at doing, your abilities. Here is an example.

My Abilities

  1. Designing interior spaces.
  2. Leading a team to accomplish a mission.
  3. Managing money.
  4. Verbal communication.
  5. Creating digital images of the natural environment and tall buildings.

Now, you are ready to think of occupations that mesh your interests and abilities. Here are some examples.

Occupations that Synchronize with Your Interests and Abilities

  1. Hands-on construction work in trades like carpenter, electrician, plumber, foundation excavator, roofer, structural steel worker.
  2. General contractor for constructing residential or commercial buildings.
  3. Interior designer.
  4. Landscape architect.
  5. Real Estate developer.
  6. Architect.
  7. Residential or commercial building sales representative.
  8. Housing development manager.
  9. Rental property manager.
  10. Bank mortgage officer for residential or commercial construction projects.

Writing Your Objective

So far, you have defined your interests and abilities, and potential occupations that mesh the two. The next step is to write an objective to focus your job hunting efforts. Here are some examples of objectives.

  • To find a job as a sales representative with a residential or commercial builder.
  • To find a job as a hands-on worker in the trades with a large commercial builder.
  • To find an entry-level job as an architect with a commercial architectural firm.
  • To find a job in the mortgage department of a local bank.
  • To find a job as an interior designer.

Now that you have defined your objective, you are ready to search for potential employers. Begin by Googling each of the ten occupations. The result will be a list of companies to target for your job search. Here are some of the companies I found when I entered several of the occupations.

Employers Who Need Workers Like You

  1. Toll Brothers. This is the nation’s largest luxury homebuilder. The company offers hands-on construction jobs, sales positions and project management jobs. www.tollbrothers.com.
  2. The Trump Organization. Trump specializes in large-scale commercial development and construction in the USA and abroad. Google “trump employment” for careers in various locations.
  3. Wells Fargo Bank. This bank is the leading home mortgage lender and hires both entry level and experienced workers to evaluate mortgage risk and approve or deny loans. www.wellsfargo.com.
  4. Walmart. The world’s largest retailer hires many skilled workers for hands-on and management jobs. As a Military Friendly company, Walmart makes a special effort to hire qualified veterans and their spouses as well. www.walmart.com.
  5. Home Depot. The nation’s leading home goods retailer has over 2,000 stores across the USA. New stores open each year providing jobs for workers with your interests and abilities. When you go to the website click on Careers and then click on Veteran’s Transition. www.homedepot.com.
  6. Skidmore, Owings and Merrill. This is the nation’s leading architectural firm. Skidmore designed the new 104-story, One World Trade Center building in New York City, the tallest building in the Western Hemisphere. It is based in New York City and has regional offices throughout our country and abroad. www.som.com.
  7. Local Realtors, Banks and Builders. Access the vast array of potential employers in your geographical area by conducting an online search. Go to Craig’s List first because it is the leading site for local job postings.

INDUSTRY SPOTLIGHT

This month we will explore two robust industries that provide many job opportunities. They are Technology and Manufacturing.

TECHNOLOGY

You can slice this industry into many parts and we advise caution because a subtle change is underway. The technology industry of the past focused on hardware like desktop and laptop computers, smart phones, digital tablets and the like. That world is changing. Going forward, technology will focus on mobile apps, social media and the cloud. There are many entrepreneurial companies in the new technology space and a number of large multi-national companies that dominate. Here are three leading the pack.

Facebook

This is the world’s leading social media company, which has morphed from a personal messaging app to an important business player. Facebook has over one billion users across all five continents. It generates revenue primarily from advertising. Consumer and investor confidence in this company’s future is reflected in the stock price, which has risen from $25/share in 2013 to $115/share as of this posting. It’s founder and CEO is 33-year-old Mark Zuckerberg, who is not only a smart and passionate techie worth billions of dollars, but also a generous philanthropist who has donated hundreds of millions of his own money to charitable causes. Facebook has offices in all major cities across the USA and in many foreign countries as well. Check out job opportunities at: www.facebook.com.

LinkedIn

LinkedIn, recently purchased by Microsoft for $25.5 billion, is the leading site for employment networking and finding job opportunities. If your interest is in the business of employment and you have significant social media abilities, this company should be on your target list. www.linkedin.com/about-us .

Salesforce.com

This is world’s leading cloud company. It is based in California and has regional offices scattered around the USA and abroad. The CEO is Mark Benioff, a leader in the technology industry who has a reputation for caring about employees, customers and the community. He has created a diverse workforce that gives special attention to women and veterans. The company offers high-level technical positions as well as positions in field sales, finance and marketing. Check the career pages at www.salesforce.com.

MANUFACTURING

How many times have you heard that manufacturing is America is dead? While it is true that a number of manufacturing companies have moved to Asia and Latin American, manufacturing is still alive, well, and offering many exciting and well-paying jobs right here in America. In fact, 15% of our GDP is generated by manufacturing, and the industry employs approximately 13% of our workforce. Here are some of our best manufacturing companies to explore for job opportunities.

Boeing

This is the world’s largest airplane manufacturer with home offices in Chicago and manufacturing facilities throughout the country. It employs approximately 170,000 workers in a wide array of jobs ranging from highly technical positions to hands-on jobs in one of its manufacturing plants. One of its largest manufacturing facilities is located in Charleston, South Carolina. Boeing is a very military friendly company. When you go to the website, click on “Careers” and then click on “Veterans.” Be sure to check out the Military Skills Translator, a device to help match your military skills with civilian jobs at Boeing. www.boeing.com.

Caterpillar

This Peoria Illinois-based company is the largest US manufacturer of heavy equipment for agriculture, building construction and earth moving. It has made a definite commitment to hiring preferences for veterans. Go to the Careers page to explore job opportunities for veterans and to read the biographical sketches of veterans employed by Caterpillar in executive and managerial positions. www.caterpillar.com .

General Electric

GE is one of our largest manufacturers, and one of the most military friendly companies in America. Go to the website and click on the Site Map. Then click on Careers, and then on Jobs for Veterans. The company manufactures products for aviation, homes, businesses, the petroleum industry, the power industry and the transportation industry, just to mention a few of its market niches. Be sure to view the list of job fairs that GE attends or sponsors. www.ge.com.

MOVING FORWARD

The job market in America continues to be robust and there are jobs waiting for those who know how to find them. Tune out the political and media hype about the sad state of our economy. With an unemployment rate of just under 5%, there has never been a better time to find a job. If you implement our job hunting rubrics, you will find a job that provides good compensation and job satisfaction as well.

This month you learned how to write a job objective to focus your job hunting efforts. In our August blog, we will discuss an important strategy in the job hunting process: preparing a resume and digital profile for the civilian workplace. Stay tuned!

To expand on the content of this blog, read Chapter 1. Self-Assessment, Aptitude, Fulfillment, Mission, Purpose, which you will find in my book, OPERATION JOB SEARCH, A Guide for Military Veterans Transitioning to Civilian Careers. Available at bookstores or at Amazon.com.

TAKEAWAYS

  • Job-hunting is a two part process: defining objectives and designing strategies.
  • The first step in the process is to discover your interests and abilities.
  • Selecting a career that requires your interests and abilities will provide job satisfaction and substantial compensation.

VETERAN’S RESOURCES

  • Goals: How to Get Everything You Want, Faster Than You Thought Possible. Brian Tracy. Barrett Koehler. c2010.
  • Veteran’s Preference (Vets receive hiring preference for federal government jobs)

Helpful Career Planning Tools 

Visit our other informative site

The information provided may not cover all aspects of unique or special circumstances, federal and postal regulations, and programs are subject to change. Our articles and replies are time sensitive. Over time, various dynamic human resource guidance and factors relied upon as a basis for this article may change. The advice and strategies contained herein may not be suitable for your situation and this service is not affiliated with OPM, the postal service or any federal entity. You should consult with school counselors, hiring agency personnel offices, and human resource professionals where appropriate. Neither the publisher or author shall be liable for any loss or any other commercial damages, including but not limited to special, incidental, consequential, or other damages.

Posted in Applying For Jobs, Federal Career Exploration, Federal Jobs, Job Qualifications, Job Vacancies, Veterans Preference

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Posted on Friday, 24th June 2016 by

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Federal Aviation Administration Jobs

The FAA is an integral part of the National Airspace System (NAS) and one of their primary strategic priorities is to make aviation safer and smarter. Another is to Lay the foundation for the NAS of the future through the implementation of major technological changes. There are many opportunities for employment in a diverse cross section of occupations.

The FAA employs 45,756 federal workers, including 295 that work in the U.S. Territories or overseas. As of December 31, 2015 there were 18,739 Air traffic controllers (FG-2152), 5,834 transportation specialists (FG-2101), 4,868 inspectors under the FG-1825 series, and 4,141 engineers of various types. Add to these numbers numerous training, staff, and support specialists, OSHA compliance officers, administrative and management positions.

 

Air Traffic Control Tower

Air Traffic Control Tower

History of the FAA

The federal government enacted the Air Commerce Act in 1926 to facilitate air commerce. This act included the issuance and enforcement of air traffic laws, licensing pilots, aircraft certification, the establishment of airways along with the operation and maintenance of navigation aids.

The Civil Aeronautics Act in1938 established the independent Civil Aeronautics Authority (CAA), with a three-member Air Safety Board that would conduct accident investigations and recommend ways of preventing accidents. Then in 1958 the President signed the Federal Aviation Act, which transferred the Civil Aeronautics Authority’s functions to a new independent Federal Aviation Agency responsible for civil aviation safety.

Finally, in 1966, Congress authorized the creation of The Department of Transportation (DOT) and under the DOT the Federal Aviation Agency became the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA).

After deregulation, the FAA designed a long term plan to modernize. The National Airspace System (NAS) Plan, a comprehensive 20-year blueprint for a state-of-the-art traffic control and air navigation system to accommodate projected growth in air travel. The Capital Investment Plan, established in 1991, incorporated NAS plan projects and higher levels of automation as well as new radar, communications, and weather forecasting systems.

The Next Generation Air Transportation System (NextGen) came into existence in 2003. This was a multi-year, multi-agency effort to develop an air transportation system for 2025 and beyond. NextGen enables the FAA to keep costs under control while providing safety, security, and efficiencies within the agency. Visit the FAA’s History page for a comprehensive historical perspective.

The Largest FAA Organizations

Air Traffic Service

The Air Traffic Organization (ATO) is the operational arm of the FAA. It is responsible for providing safe and efficient air navigation services to 30.2 million square miles of airspace. This represents more than 17 percent of the world’s airspace and includes all of the United States and large portions of the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans and the Gulf of Mexico.

Over 18,000 federal air traffic controllers at 315 FAA air traffic facilities are on the job, guiding more than 87,000 flights every day across our national airspace system.

Primary Occupations:

Primary Air Traffic Controller duties: (Excerpted from the OOH)

Air traffic controllers typically do the following:

  • Issue landing and takeoff instructions to pilots
  • Monitor and direct the movement of aircraft on the ground and in the air, using radar, computers, or visual references
  • Control all ground traffic at airports, including baggage vehicles and airport workers
  • Manage communications by transferring control of departing flights to other traffic control centers and accepting control of arriving flights
  • Provide information to pilots, such as weather updates, runway closures, and other critical information
  • Alert airport response staff, in the event of an aircraft emergency

Air traffic controllers’ primary concern is safety, but they also must direct aircraft efficiently to minimize delays. They manage the flow of aircraft into and out of the airport airspace, guide pilots during takeoff and landing, and monitor aircraft as they travel through the skies.

Controllers usually manage multiple aircraft at the same time and must make quick decisions to ensure the safety of the aircraft. For example, a controller might direct one aircraft on its landing approach while providing another aircraft with weather information.

The following are examples of types of air traffic controllers:

Tower controllers direct the movement of vehicles on runways and taxiways. They check flight plans, give pilots clearance for takeoff or landing, and direct the movement of aircraft and other traffic on the runways and in other parts of the airport. Most work from control towers, watching the traffic they control.

Approach and departure controllers ensure that aircraft traveling within an airport’s airspace maintain minimum separation for safety. They give clearances to enter controlled airspace and hand off control of aircraft to en route controllers. They use radar equipment to monitor flight paths and work in buildings known as Terminal Radar Approach Control Centers (TRACONs). They also provide information to pilots, such as weather conditions and other critical notices.

En route controllers monitor aircraft once they leave an airport’s airspace. They work at air route traffic control centers located throughout the country, which typically are not located at airports.

Technical Operations (Airways Facilities Service)

Technical Operations ensures safety and efficiency in the National Airspace System (NAS) by effectively managing air navigation services and infrastructure.

Technical Operations staff members oversee the following activities and services:

  • Efficient flight services to customers through responsive and cost-effective maintenance of NAS facilities, systems, and equipment
  • Safe, cost-effective, and efficient communications; frequency spectrum engineering; and navigational services for NAS
  • Standard development, evaluation, and certification of NAS procedures and equipment for customers worldwide
  • Infrastructure management including policy, programming, requirements, engineering, integration and implementation support, service life extension, and maintenance support

Primary Occupations:

  • Airway Transportation Systems Specialist (FG-2101)
    • Navigational Aids
    • Communications
    • Automation
    • Surveillance (RADAR)

Primary Airways Transportation System Specialist duties:

Airway Transportation Systems Specialists (ATSS) perform in the capacity of highly specialized electronics technicians The primary responsibilities of this position are associated with the installation, maintenance, modification and certification of communications, navigational aids, environmental, radar or automation fields.

Airway Transportation Systems Specialists (ATSS) install, maintain, modify and certify electronic equipment and lighting aids associated with facilities and services required for aviation navigation to assure a reliable, safe, and smooth flow of air traffic. This involves work with radar, communications, automation, and navigational aids equipment as well as airport lighting aids and electrical/mechanical equipment supporting facilities on and off airports within the network of the National Airspace System.

It includes periodic maintenance (inspection and analysis of equipment with associated adjustments), modification, corrective maintenance, troubleshooting, repair and replacement of malfunctioning equipment, and certification. ATSSs may be required to maintain entire facilities, including electronic equipment, electrical power distribution, emergency backup power conditioning systems, and heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) systems; electronic equipment only; or power and HVAC systems only.

Flight Standards Service

The Flight Standards Service promotes safe air transportation by setting the standards for certification and oversight of airmen, air operators, air agencies, and designees. They also promote safety of flight of civil aircraft and air commerce by:

  • Accomplishing certification, inspection, surveillance, investigation, and enforcement
  • Setting regulations and standards
  • Managing the system for registration of civil aircraft and all airmen records

Primary Occupations:

  • Aviation Safety Inspector (FG-1825)
  • Air Carrier Operations
  • Air Carrier Avionics
  • Air Carrier Maintenance

Primary Aviation Safety Inspector duties:

Aviation Safety Inspectors in these specialties apply knowledge and skills typically acquired as repairman of aircraft, aircraft parts, or avionics equipment to develop and administer regulations and safety standards pertaining to the airworthiness and maintenance of aircraft and related equipment. They engage primarily in the following types of assignments:

(a) Evaluating mechanics and repair facilities for initial certification and continuing adequacy

(b) evaluating the mechanic`s training program

(c) inspecting aircraft and related equipment for airworthiness

(d) evaluating the maintenance aspects of programs of air carriers and similar commercial operations. The evaluations may include the adequacy of maintenance facilities, equipment and procedures; the competence of employees; the adequacy of the program or schedule for periodic maintenance and overhauls; and the airworthiness of the aircraft. Aviation Safety Inspectors (Airworthiness) may perform a variety of other inspections, investigations and advisory duties. However the primary requirement for positions in this specialty is knowledge and skill pertaining to the maintenance and airworthiness of aircraft. Inspectors are required to travel frequently and to occasionally work irregular duty hours.

The next article in this series will include an interview with an air traffic controller (FG-2152) from LaGuardia International Airport located in New York City, NY.

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