Posted on Friday, 22nd July 2016 by

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Physicians & Medical Specialist Jobs with the Army

Positions are now available for those who want to pioneer innovative medical techniques while caring for Soldiers and their families in some of the world’s most renowned facilities.

Army Physicians receive competitive pay, full benefit package, generous paid time off, educational opportunities, career advancement, and the opportunity to provide uniquely challenging and fulfilling care to those in need.

Currently there are over 180 job openings at facilities nationwide and overseas. Current openings include:

  • 62 physicians
  • 50 nurses
  • 15 practical nurses
  • 9 psychologists
  • 13 physician assistants
  • 6 rehabilitation therapy assistants
  • 4 medical technologists
  • 3 physical therapists
  • 2 nursing assistants
  • 3 diagnostic radiological technologists
  • 1 pharmacist
  • 1 audiologist /speech pathologist
  • 2 dental assistants
  • 3 social workers
  • 1 respiratory therapist
  • 2 pharmacy technician
  • 1 orthotist and prosthetist
  • 1 veterinarian

There are over 330,000 Army Civilians that aren’t active duty military. They serve as an integral part of the Army team to support the defense of our nation. You can become part of their global family by providing quality, world class health care throughout the U.S., Europe and the Pacific. Medcell recruits Medical Professionals for the United States Army.

Take a closer look at their current openings: http://medcell.army.mil/currentjobs.aspx (Applications accepted on USAJOBS.)

Healthcare Careers (Federal Government) 

Applying for Federal Jobs

Visit our other informative site

The information provided may not cover all aspects of unique or special circumstances, federal and postal regulations, and programs are subject to change. Our articles and replies are time sensitive. Over time, various dynamic human resource guidance and factors relied upon as a basis for this article may change. The advice and strategies contained herein may not be suitable for your situation and this service is not affiliated with OPM, the postal service or any federal entity. You should consult with school counselors, hiring agency personnel offices, and human resource professionals where appropriate. Neither the publisher or author shall be liable for any loss or any other commercial damages, including but not limited to special, incidental, consequential, or other damages.

Posted in Applying For Jobs, Civil Service Tests, Federal Jobs, Job Qualifications, Job Vacancies

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Posted on Tuesday, 19th July 2016 by

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Department of Homeland Security Job Openings

DHS is seeking qualified candidates to fulfill mission-critical job openings within Cyber, Information Technology, and Human Resources. Join them for the DHS Technology Job Fair at the Omni Shoreham Hotel in Washington, DC, on July 27 and 28!

The DHS plans to make hundreds of on-the-spot conditional job offers at the upcoming job fair to fill mission-critical roles across the Department. They are seeking out the best and brightest computer scientists, engineers, analysts, mathematicians, problem solvers, and innovative thinkers.

The DHS offers rewarding work in Cyber, Information Technology, and Human Resources and they need your expertise in Cloud Infrastructure and Services, Agile Development, and Mobile Technologies.

They are hiring for grades GS-09, GS-11, GS-12, GS-13, GS-14, and GS-15. Salaries for these grades in the DC Metro area range from $53,435 to $160,300. Candidates must be U.S. citizens and able to obtain/maintain a Secret up to a Top Secret/SCI security clearance based upon position requirements.

The following announcements are open for this exciting event:

  1. Information Technology Specialist (INFOSEC), GS-2210-09/11. Apply at USAJOBS.
  2. Information Technology Specialist (INFOSEC), GS-2210-12/13/14. Apply at USAJOBS.
  3. Information Technology Specialist (INFOSEC), GS-2210-15. Apply at USAJOBS.
  4. Management and Program Analyst, GS-0343-12/13/14. Apply at USAJOBS.
  5. Human Resources Specialist, GS-0201-09/11/12. Apply at USAJOBS.

How to Apply

Attendees of the DHS Technology Job Fair are strongly encouraged to apply for vacancies prior to attending the event.

Fill out an application(s) on USAJOBS. Create or update your personal profile, upload your resume, and apply for one or more of the job announcements through USAJOBS. The online job application deadline is July 29, 2016.

Interview. If you apply by July 20, 2016, and meet the requisite qualifications for the role, you will receive an invitation from DHS for a specific interview slot at the job fair event on July 27-28. The invitation will provide important instructions and requirements for any additional information that should be brought to the interview. If you apply, but are not invited to interview, you are still welcome to attend the event, and your application will be maintained until January 28, 2017. The vacancy announcement will be open through July 29 should you choose to apply after attending the event, but you are not guaranteed the same expedited interview process.

Get hired! If selected, you will receive a conditional job offer on the spot and start your security clearance process the same day!

Helpful Career Planning Tools 

Visit our other informative site

The information provided may not cover all aspects of unique or special circumstances, federal and postal regulations, and programs are subject to change. Our articles and replies are time sensitive. Over time, various dynamic human resource guidance and factors relied upon as a basis for this article may change. The advice and strategies contained herein may not be suitable for your situation and this service is not affiliated with OPM, the postal service or any federal entity. You should consult with school counselors, hiring agency personnel offices, and human resource professionals where appropriate. Neither the publisher or author shall be liable for any loss or any other commercial damages, including but not limited to special, incidental, consequential, or other damages.

Posted in Applying For Jobs, Civil Service Tests, Federal Career Exploration, Federal Jobs, Job Interviews, Job Qualifications, Job Vacancies, Law Enforcement jobs

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Posted on Sunday, 17th July 2016 by

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Air Traffic Controller Jobs

The National Airspace System (NAS), managed by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), is designed to safely and efficiently move air traffic cross country and at terminal facilities. The FAA staffs 22 Air Route Traffic Control Centers (ARTCCs), over 150 Terminal Radar Approach Control Facilities (TRACONs) and Air Traffic Control Towers (ATCTs) located at major airports throughout the country and U.S. Territories. This vast network ensures the safe operation of commercial and private aircraft in the United States and international airspace assigned to U.S. control.

Air traffic controllers coordinate the movement of aircraft to maintain safe separation in air and on the ground at terminal facilities. They also coordinate all ground traffic at FAA ATCT airports including vehicles used by airport authorities, airlines, fire equipment, and system specialists that must have access to airport runways for maintenance and various other purposes.

Their primary and immediate concern is safety however they must also work efficiently to minimize delays. Some regulate airport traffic through designated airspaces; others regulate airport arrivals and departures.

The FAA hires air traffic controllers as retirements occur or individuals leave for other reasons or are promoted and leave the active controller workforce. The Bureau of Labor Statistics projects an increase from 18,739 controllers today to 22,400 by 2022. The median salary is $122,950 a year or $59.11 per hour. Air traffic controllers and other FAA employees are in a core compensation pay band system instead of the competitive service’s General Schedule (GS) pay system. The job series preface is FG instead of the GS you typically see on the USAJOBS.GOV site. New hires without prior air traffic control experience must be 30 years of age or younger.

There are three paths to employment one of which is passing the Air Traffic Selection and Training Aptitude Test (AT-SAT).  This test is an eight-hour computer based pre-employment test that is used by the FAA to measure aptitude required for entry-level air traffic control specialist positions.

Interview with Danielle Richards (Day in the life of an air traffic controller)

 

Danielle Richards - ATC

Danielle Richards – ATC

Danielle Richards began her career in 2008 when she reported to the FAA Academy in Oklahoma City to begin training to become an air traffic controller. After training, she reported to the FAA ATCT at LaGuardia Airport in New York. She completed on-the-job training and became a Certified Professional Controller at LaGuardia Tower. Richards later transferred to the Potomac Terminal Radar Approach Control (TRACON) in Virginia in 2012. She recently returned to LaGuardia Tower as an Operations Manager. Her job series is FG- 2152, however, air traffic employees are not in the traditional grade structure for federal employees, the pay band is KJ.

Why did you become an Air Traffic Controller? 

The truth is I knew nothing about air traffic control. My father had a friend who had a friend who was a controller, and that’s how I found out about it.   The application test was open to the general public back in 2007 and 2008. My father persistently was asking me, “did you apply yet” that finally convinced me to take the test. Little did I know that it would be the best decision that my father convinced me to make!

What are some of the unique aspects of being an Air Traffic Controller?

Air Traffic Control is unique. The air traffic control community is much smaller than you might think. Before I became an air traffic controller, I never met anyone in the field. Now it seems like controllers are everywhere. Every time I meet a new controller, they either know, worked with, or have heard of someone I know.

You have to love air traffic and be respectful of the great responsibility you have been given. People who don’t even know who you are trust you, and in many cases they don’t even know what controllers really do. Pilots and the flying public trust controllers despite the fact that they will never see you or meet you. It is very humbling when you think about it.

Air Traffic is never a one-person show. Everyone works together to get the job done. You build a trust with your co-workers that is critical. One more thing, timing is everything. You wouldn’t believe it, but in air traffic even a second or two makes a difference in the efficiency of your flight.

What are some of the challenges you face being an Air Traffic Controller?

A challenge that we face on a day-to-day basis is making quick decisions. There is no time for indecisiveness. Another challenge is that you are constantly multi-tasking. You have to focus on what you are doing while listening to another controller giving you instructions or information. However, the biggest challenge that I face is not taking the job home with me. If you think about all of the people’s lives that you touch in a day, a week or a year it can become overwhelming.

Are there any dangerous aspects involved with being an Air Traffic Controller?  

Air travel is the safest mode of transportation. Safety is the top priority of every air traffic controller.

Would you recommend this as a good job occupation to for a prospective job applicant? 

I would absolutely recommend this as a great occupation. If you want a career that is challenging and rewarding, that uses your strengths and develops your weaknesses; if you want to grow personally and professionally and have a career that you can be proud of doing every day, then Air Traffic Control is what you are looking for.

Air Traffic Controller’s Basic Requirements

The Department of Labor’s Occupational Outlook Handbook (OOH) specifies the following basic requirements for this position.

To become an air traffic controller, an applicant must

  • Be a U.S. citizen
  • Have a bachelor’s degree, or work experience, or a combination of education and experience totaling 3 years
  • Pass medical and background checks
  • Achieve a qualifying score on the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) pre-employment test, which includes a biographical assessment
  • Pass the Air Traffic Standardized Aptitude Test (AT-SAT)
  • Complete a training course at the FAA Academy (and start it before turning 31 years of age)

The AT-SAT is an 8-hour, computer-based exam. Some of the characteristics tested include arithmetic, prioritization, planning, tolerance for high intensity, decisiveness, visualization, problem solving, and movement detection.

Controllers also must pass a physical exam each year and a job performance exam twice per year. In addition, they must pass periodic drug screenings.

Air Traffic Controller’s Job Description (FG-2152)

NOTE: The following information is excerpted from OPM’s GS-2152 job series qualification standards. Air Traffic controllers are in the excepted service and their core compensation pay bands are different than the standard GS pay scales listed here. The FAA assigns a pay band to each of these levels and the corresponding pay is derived from their pay tables. The job series preface is FG for the FAA.  Use this information to understand the qualification requirements from entry level to a full performance air traffic controller.

Qualifications - Excerpted from opm.gov.

General Experience for GS-4 and GS-5

Progressively responsible experience that demonstrated the potential for learning and performing air traffic control work. Two years of such experience is required for GS-4 positions, and 3 years is required for GS-2152-5 positions.

Specialized Experience (GS-7 and above)

Experience in a military or civilian air traffic facility that demonstrated possession of the knowledge, skills, and abilities required to perform the level of work of the specialization for which application is made. This experience must have provided a comprehensive knowledge of appropriate air traffic control laws, rules, and regulations.

Examples of specialized experience include:

For Station Positions: Providing information to pilots on such matters as weather, air routes, navigational aids, and airport conditions before and during flight. This specialization also requires:

  • Judgment to select only essential and pertinent information from a great mass of data;
  • Skill to present essential information to pilots clearly, concisely, and quickly before or during flight; and
  • Ability to act decisively in emergency situations.

For Terminal Positions: Issuing control instructions and advice to pilots in the vicinity of airports to assure proper separation of aircraft and to expedite their safe and efficient movement. This specialization also requires:

  • Ability to act decisively under stressful situations and to maintain alertness over sustained periods of pressure;
  • Skill to coordinate plans and actions with pilots and other controllers; and
  • Judgment to select and take the safest and most effective course of action from among several available choices.

For Center Positions: Controlling aircraft operating enroute along the airways to assure proper separation and safe and expeditious movement of such aircraft. This specialization also requires:

  • Skill to control aircraft operating at very high speeds over great distances;
  • Skill to arrange air traffic in patterns that assure maximum safety and minimum delay at points where such aircraft are “handed off” or transferred to other facilities or other sectors within the center; and
  • Judgment to estimate when and where traffic congestion will build to a point that necessitates changing patterns, and to plan accordingly.

For Research and Development Positions: Experience in a terminal, station, or center that demonstrated the ability or potential to:

  • Create, design, and/or develop new air traffic control systems or concepts; and
  • Analyze, test, and evaluate current or new air traffic control procedures, methods, systems, or concepts.

For Combination Positions: Positions involving a combination of the duties of two or more specializations require that applicants meet the qualification requirements for the appropriate specializations.

Up through GS-7, specialized experience in one specialization is fully qualifying for reassignment or promotion into another specialization. At GS-9 and above, experience and training in one specialization is qualifying for another specialization if the applicant’s total background indicates that he or she can gain the knowledge, skills, and abilities required in the new assignment after a reasonable period of orientation and training. All positions at the full performance level of each specialization require skill and training in the work of the specialization.

For all specializations, qualifying specialized experience must have provided the ability to:

  • Arrive quickly at well-reasoned solutions to complex problems;
  • Adjust quickly to different assignments, changing conditions, and workload fluctuations;
  • Remain calm and controlled during and after long periods of tension and fatigue; and
  • Speak rapidly, clearly, and distinctly.

Level of Experience: For each grade level, creditable experience must have equipped applicants with the knowledge, skills, and abilities to perform the full range of duties of the position for which application is being made. Such experience is typically demonstrated by accomplishment of assignments of the difficulty and responsibility described in the position classification standard used to evaluate positions at the next lower grade level in the normal line of promotion to the position being filled.

Education

For GS-5 Positions: A full 4-year course of study leading to a bachelor’s degree meets the requirements for GS-5.

For GS-7 Positions: Superior academic achievement at the baccalaureate level or 1 full year of graduate study meets the requirements for GS-7.

Alternate Requirements for GS-7 Positions

Applicants who pass the written test qualify for GS-7 if they:

  • Hold or have held an appropriate facility rating and have actively controlled air traffic in civilian or military air traffic control terminals or centers;
  • Hold or have held an FAA certificate as a dispatcher for an air carrier;
  • Hold or have held an instrument flight rating;
  • Hold or have held an FAA certificate as a navigator or have been fully qualified as a Navigator/Bombardier in the Armed Forces;
  • Have 350 hours of flight time as a copilot or higher and hold or have held a private certificate or equivalent Armed Forces rating;
  • Have served as a rated Aerospace Defense Command Intercept Director; or
  • Meet the requirements for GS-5 and pass the written test with an appropriately higher score.

Maximum Entry Age

Under the provisions of 5 U.S.C. 3307, a maximum entry age has been established for Terminal and Center positions.

Test Requirements

Applicants for competitive appointment and inservice placement to all positions in this series at GS-7 and below must pass a written test. A written test may also be required for positions above GS-7.

Personal Qualities

In addition to meeting all other requirements, applicants must demonstrate possession of the traits and characteristics important in air traffic control work. Applicants who qualify in the written test and/or meet the experience and training requirements will be required to appear for a pre-employment interview to determine whether they possess the personal characteristics necessary for performance of air traffic control work.

Additional Screening Requirements

Applicants who have passed the written test (and the interview, if required) may be required to pass additional air traffic control aptitude screening for positions in the Department of Transportation, Federal Aviation Administration. Persons who do not pass the aptitude evaluation testing requirements will not be appointed to these positions.

Training Requirements

At all trainee and developmental levels, employees must learn the skills needed for operation at higher levels of responsibility. Failure of employees to meet training requirements for or accept promotion to higher grade air traffic control specialist positions may constitute grounds for reassignment, demotion, or separation from employment.

Certificate and Rating Requirements

Air traffic control specialists in all specializations must possess or obtain, within uniformly applicable time limits, the facility ratings required for full performance at the facility where the position is located.

Applicants must possess or obtain a valid Air Traffic Control Specialist Certificate and/or Control Tower Operator Certificate, if appropriate. These certificates require demonstrating knowledge of basic meteorology, basic air navigation, standard air traffic control and communications procedures, the types and uses of air navigation aids, and regulations governing air traffic.

Facility ratings require demonstration of a knowledge of the kind and location of radio aids to air navigation, the terrain, the landmarks, the communications systems and circuits, and the procedures peculiar to the area covered by the facility.

Medical Requirements

In general, air traffic control specialist applicants and employees must have the capacity to perform the essential functions of these positions without risk to themselves or others. The provision of sufficient information about physical capacity for employment requires that before appointment applicants undergo appropriate pre-employment physical/medical evaluations.

In our final article in our series on the FAA we will interview an airway transportation systems specialist (GS-2101).

Credit

  • Arlene Salac, Public Affairs Officer, Washington, D.C.
  • FAA website: http://www.faa.go v
  • Photos provided by the FAA

Additional Resources

Helpful Career Planning Tools 

Visit our other informative site

The information provided may not cover all aspects of unique or special circumstances, federal and postal regulations, and programs are subject to change. Our articles and replies are time sensitive. Over time, various dynamic human resource guidance and factors relied upon as a basis for this article may change. The advice and strategies contained herein may not be suitable for your situation and this service is not affiliated with OPM, the postal service or any federal entity. You should consult with school counselors, hiring agency personnel offices, and human resource professionals where appropriate. Neither the publisher or author shall be liable for any loss or any other commercial damages, including but not limited to special, incidental, consequential, or other damages.

Posted in Applying For Jobs, Civil Service Tests, Federal Career Exploration, Federal Employees, Federal Jobs, Job Interviews, Job Qualifications, Job Vacancies

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Posted on Wednesday, 13th July 2016 by

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Writing a Federal Resume

Many federal job applicants are unaware of the requirement to provide a detailed federal style resume with their application. The federal style resume is typically 3 to 10 pages or more compared to the one page private sector version. The best qualified are selected for interviews and to make that cut you must provide detailed supportive information that confirms your qualifications for the position. Basically, you must provide a work history that highlights what you did in your prior work history to achieved the knowledge, skills, and abilities (KSAs) required for the job.

The key to landing a federal job is tailoring your federal resume to the job announcement, now called the Job Opportunity Announcement (JOA). OPM is offering free (online) hour and a half long briefings to explain each section of the JOA to help applicants identify the right job. According to OPM, “These presentations highlight a 3 part process to assist applicants in writing their Federal resume. Attendees will be shown a real JOA and walked through reviewing the JOA to determine qualifications and interest, identifying the important requirements and then tailoring their resumes with that JOA. Lastly, it will provide a quick overview of the resume builder on USAJOBS.”

The agenda, meeting dates, and times are available on OPM’s web site. Four sessions are initially scheduled for July 28 and 29. Registration is limited to 1500 participants. Other dates will be announced on USAJobs so visit their site frequently if you would like to attend a session.

There are professional services available if you need assistance that provide a free review of your background, previously prepared documents, and job announcement. Those who can put their thoughts on paper logically and have the time to tailor their federal resume to the JOA are able to complete their application on the USAJobs resume builder. Our federal resume sample will help you focus on the task at hand. I suggest completing your federal resume off line on your desktop first. Simply copy and paste what you compiled on your desktop into the resume builder after spell checking and taking your time to compose your resume. Too many rush through the process on the resume builder leaving out key information and the final document may have typos and spelling errors.

If you are interested in a federal job take advantage of OPM’s online virtual briefings and research the process to ensure your application includes the supporting information required to be rated “Best Qualified” for the position.

Helpful Career Planning Tools 

Visit our other informative site

The information provided may not cover all aspects of unique or special circumstances, federal and postal regulations, and programs are subject to change. Our articles and replies are time sensitive. Over time, various dynamic human resource guidance and factors relied upon as a basis for this article may change. The advice and strategies contained herein may not be suitable for your situation and this service is not affiliated with OPM, the postal service or any federal entity. You should consult with school counselors, hiring agency personnel offices, and human resource professionals where appropriate. Neither the publisher or author shall be liable for any loss or any other commercial damages, including but not limited to special, incidental, consequential, or other damages.

Posted in Applying For Jobs, Federal Career Exploration, Federal Jobs, Job Qualifications, Job Vacancies

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Posted on Tuesday, 5th July 2016 by

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Federal Job Hunting Process

Seeking a new job is a multi-faceted process, not merely a one-step event where you construct a resume and send it to hundreds of Internet job boards and company career pages. Many veterans make this common mistake. It costs them dearly in time and adds to the frustration of entering the civilian workforce. There is a better way and we will help you work through it.

 

Job Hunting is a Process

Job Hunting is a Process

DEFINING THE PROCESS

Job-hunting is a process, or operation, which has two parts.

  1. Defining an objective.
  2. Designing strategies to accomplish the objective or mission.

First, let’s concentrate on defining the objective; what kind of civilian work you want to do. To do so, you must first learn who you are. Street wisdom might tell you that discovering who you are is a lengthy task that involves counseling by a psychologist or career coach. It sounds like a daunting task, one that many veterans have neither the time nor inclination to undertake. There is a better way, one that you can do on your own and achieve remarkable results.

GETTING STARTED

All you need is pen and paper, or your digital tools like an iPad or similar, to record your thoughts. Begin by recording, from highest to lowest, the the five things that interest you most. Here is an example.

My Interests

  1. Architecture.
  2. Environmental matters.
  3. Technology, particularly social media.
  4. Financial investing.
  5. Building things.

Now list five things that you are good at doing, your abilities. Here is an example.

My Abilities

  1. Designing interior spaces.
  2. Leading a team to accomplish a mission.
  3. Managing money.
  4. Verbal communication.
  5. Creating digital images of the natural environment and tall buildings.

Now, you are ready to think of occupations that mesh your interests and abilities. Here are some examples.

Occupations that Synchronize with Your Interests and Abilities

  1. Hands-on construction work in trades like carpenter, electrician, plumber, foundation excavator, roofer, structural steel worker.
  2. General contractor for constructing residential or commercial buildings.
  3. Interior designer.
  4. Landscape architect.
  5. Real Estate developer.
  6. Architect.
  7. Residential or commercial building sales representative.
  8. Housing development manager.
  9. Rental property manager.
  10. Bank mortgage officer for residential or commercial construction projects.

Writing Your Objective

So far, you have defined your interests and abilities, and potential occupations that mesh the two. The next step is to write an objective to focus your job hunting efforts. Here are some examples of objectives.

  • To find a job as a sales representative with a residential or commercial builder.
  • To find a job as a hands-on worker in the trades with a large commercial builder.
  • To find an entry-level job as an architect with a commercial architectural firm.
  • To find a job in the mortgage department of a local bank.
  • To find a job as an interior designer.

Now that you have defined your objective, you are ready to search for potential employers. Begin by Googling each of the ten occupations. The result will be a list of companies to target for your job search. Here are some of the companies I found when I entered several of the occupations.

Employers Who Need Workers Like You

  1. Toll Brothers. This is the nation’s largest luxury homebuilder. The company offers hands-on construction jobs, sales positions and project management jobs. www.tollbrothers.com.
  2. The Trump Organization. Trump specializes in large-scale commercial development and construction in the USA and abroad. Google “trump employment” for careers in various locations.
  3. Wells Fargo Bank. This bank is the leading home mortgage lender and hires both entry level and experienced workers to evaluate mortgage risk and approve or deny loans. www.wellsfargo.com.
  4. Walmart. The world’s largest retailer hires many skilled workers for hands-on and management jobs. As a Military Friendly company, Walmart makes a special effort to hire qualified veterans and their spouses as well. www.walmart.com.
  5. Home Depot. The nation’s leading home goods retailer has over 2,000 stores across the USA. New stores open each year providing jobs for workers with your interests and abilities. When you go to the website click on Careers and then click on Veteran’s Transition. www.homedepot.com.
  6. Skidmore, Owings and Merrill. This is the nation’s leading architectural firm. Skidmore designed the new 104-story, One World Trade Center building in New York City, the tallest building in the Western Hemisphere. It is based in New York City and has regional offices throughout our country and abroad. www.som.com.
  7. Local Realtors, Banks and Builders. Access the vast array of potential employers in your geographical area by conducting an online search. Go to Craig’s List first because it is the leading site for local job postings.

INDUSTRY SPOTLIGHT

This month we will explore two robust industries that provide many job opportunities. They are Technology and Manufacturing.

TECHNOLOGY

You can slice this industry into many parts and we advise caution because a subtle change is underway. The technology industry of the past focused on hardware like desktop and laptop computers, smart phones, digital tablets and the like. That world is changing. Going forward, technology will focus on mobile apps, social media and the cloud. There are many entrepreneurial companies in the new technology space and a number of large multi-national companies that dominate. Here are three leading the pack.

Facebook

This is the world’s leading social media company, which has morphed from a personal messaging app to an important business player. Facebook has over one billion users across all five continents. It generates revenue primarily from advertising. Consumer and investor confidence in this company’s future is reflected in the stock price, which has risen from $25/share in 2013 to $115/share as of this posting. It’s founder and CEO is 33-year-old Mark Zuckerberg, who is not only a smart and passionate techie worth billions of dollars, but also a generous philanthropist who has donated hundreds of millions of his own money to charitable causes. Facebook has offices in all major cities across the USA and in many foreign countries as well. Check out job opportunities at: www.facebook.com.

LinkedIn

LinkedIn, recently purchased by Microsoft for $25.5 billion, is the leading site for employment networking and finding job opportunities. If your interest is in the business of employment and you have significant social media abilities, this company should be on your target list. www.linkedin.com/about-us .

Salesforce.com

This is world’s leading cloud company. It is based in California and has regional offices scattered around the USA and abroad. The CEO is Mark Benioff, a leader in the technology industry who has a reputation for caring about employees, customers and the community. He has created a diverse workforce that gives special attention to women and veterans. The company offers high-level technical positions as well as positions in field sales, finance and marketing. Check the career pages at www.salesforce.com.

MANUFACTURING

How many times have you heard that manufacturing is America is dead? While it is true that a number of manufacturing companies have moved to Asia and Latin American, manufacturing is still alive, well, and offering many exciting and well-paying jobs right here in America. In fact, 15% of our GDP is generated by manufacturing, and the industry employs approximately 13% of our workforce. Here are some of our best manufacturing companies to explore for job opportunities.

Boeing

This is the world’s largest airplane manufacturer with home offices in Chicago and manufacturing facilities throughout the country. It employs approximately 170,000 workers in a wide array of jobs ranging from highly technical positions to hands-on jobs in one of its manufacturing plants. One of its largest manufacturing facilities is located in Charleston, South Carolina. Boeing is a very military friendly company. When you go to the website, click on “Careers” and then click on “Veterans.” Be sure to check out the Military Skills Translator, a device to help match your military skills with civilian jobs at Boeing. www.boeing.com.

Caterpillar

This Peoria Illinois-based company is the largest US manufacturer of heavy equipment for agriculture, building construction and earth moving. It has made a definite commitment to hiring preferences for veterans. Go to the Careers page to explore job opportunities for veterans and to read the biographical sketches of veterans employed by Caterpillar in executive and managerial positions. www.caterpillar.com .

General Electric

GE is one of our largest manufacturers, and one of the most military friendly companies in America. Go to the website and click on the Site Map. Then click on Careers, and then on Jobs for Veterans. The company manufactures products for aviation, homes, businesses, the petroleum industry, the power industry and the transportation industry, just to mention a few of its market niches. Be sure to view the list of job fairs that GE attends or sponsors. www.ge.com.

MOVING FORWARD

The job market in America continues to be robust and there are jobs waiting for those who know how to find them. Tune out the political and media hype about the sad state of our economy. With an unemployment rate of just under 5%, there has never been a better time to find a job. If you implement our job hunting rubrics, you will find a job that provides good compensation and job satisfaction as well.

This month you learned how to write a job objective to focus your job hunting efforts. In our August blog, we will discuss an important strategy in the job hunting process: preparing a resume and digital profile for the civilian workplace. Stay tuned!

To expand on the content of this blog, read Chapter 1. Self-Assessment, Aptitude, Fulfillment, Mission, Purpose, which you will find in my book, OPERATION JOB SEARCH, A Guide for Military Veterans Transitioning to Civilian Careers. Available at bookstores or at Amazon.com.

TAKEAWAYS

  • Job-hunting is a two part process: defining objectives and designing strategies.
  • The first step in the process is to discover your interests and abilities.
  • Selecting a career that requires your interests and abilities will provide job satisfaction and substantial compensation.

VETERAN’S RESOURCES

  • Goals: How to Get Everything You Want, Faster Than You Thought Possible. Brian Tracy. Barrett Koehler. c2010.
  • Veteran’s Preference (Vets receive hiring preference for federal government jobs)

Helpful Career Planning Tools 

Visit our other informative site

The information provided may not cover all aspects of unique or special circumstances, federal and postal regulations, and programs are subject to change. Our articles and replies are time sensitive. Over time, various dynamic human resource guidance and factors relied upon as a basis for this article may change. The advice and strategies contained herein may not be suitable for your situation and this service is not affiliated with OPM, the postal service or any federal entity. You should consult with school counselors, hiring agency personnel offices, and human resource professionals where appropriate. Neither the publisher or author shall be liable for any loss or any other commercial damages, including but not limited to special, incidental, consequential, or other damages.

Posted in Applying For Jobs, Federal Career Exploration, Federal Jobs, Job Qualifications, Job Vacancies, Veterans Preference

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Posted on Friday, 24th June 2016 by

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Federal Aviation Administration Jobs

The FAA is an integral part of the National Airspace System (NAS) and one of their primary strategic priorities is to make aviation safer and smarter. Another is to Lay the foundation for the NAS of the future through the implementation of major technological changes. There are many opportunities for employment in a diverse cross section of occupations.

The FAA employs 45,756 federal workers, including 295 that work in the U.S. Territories or overseas. As of December 31, 2015 there were 18,739 Air traffic controllers (FG-2152), 5,834 transportation specialists (FG-2101), 4,868 inspectors under the FG-1825 series, and 4,141 engineers of various types. Add to these numbers numerous training, staff, and support specialists, OSHA compliance officers, administrative and management positions.

 

Air Traffic Control Tower

Air Traffic Control Tower

History of the FAA

The federal government enacted the Air Commerce Act in 1926 to facilitate air commerce. This act included the issuance and enforcement of air traffic laws, licensing pilots, aircraft certification, the establishment of airways along with the operation and maintenance of navigation aids.

The Civil Aeronautics Act in1938 established the independent Civil Aeronautics Authority (CAA), with a three-member Air Safety Board that would conduct accident investigations and recommend ways of preventing accidents. Then in 1958 the President signed the Federal Aviation Act, which transferred the Civil Aeronautics Authority’s functions to a new independent Federal Aviation Agency responsible for civil aviation safety.

Finally, in 1966, Congress authorized the creation of The Department of Transportation (DOT) and under the DOT the Federal Aviation Agency became the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA).

After deregulation, the FAA designed a long term plan to modernize. The National Airspace System (NAS) Plan, a comprehensive 20-year blueprint for a state-of-the-art traffic control and air navigation system to accommodate projected growth in air travel. The Capital Investment Plan, established in 1991, incorporated NAS plan projects and higher levels of automation as well as new radar, communications, and weather forecasting systems.

The Next Generation Air Transportation System (NextGen) came into existence in 2003. This was a multi-year, multi-agency effort to develop an air transportation system for 2025 and beyond. NextGen enables the FAA to keep costs under control while providing safety, security, and efficiencies within the agency. Visit the FAA’s History page for a comprehensive historical perspective.

The Largest FAA Organizations

Air Traffic Service

The Air Traffic Organization (ATO) is the operational arm of the FAA. It is responsible for providing safe and efficient air navigation services to 30.2 million square miles of airspace. This represents more than 17 percent of the world’s airspace and includes all of the United States and large portions of the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans and the Gulf of Mexico.

Over 18,000 federal air traffic controllers at 315 FAA air traffic facilities are on the job, guiding more than 87,000 flights every day across our national airspace system.

Primary Occupations:

Primary Air Traffic Controller duties: (Excerpted from the OOH)

Air traffic controllers typically do the following:

  • Issue landing and takeoff instructions to pilots
  • Monitor and direct the movement of aircraft on the ground and in the air, using radar, computers, or visual references
  • Control all ground traffic at airports, including baggage vehicles and airport workers
  • Manage communications by transferring control of departing flights to other traffic control centers and accepting control of arriving flights
  • Provide information to pilots, such as weather updates, runway closures, and other critical information
  • Alert airport response staff, in the event of an aircraft emergency

Air traffic controllers’ primary concern is safety, but they also must direct aircraft efficiently to minimize delays. They manage the flow of aircraft into and out of the airport airspace, guide pilots during takeoff and landing, and monitor aircraft as they travel through the skies.

Controllers usually manage multiple aircraft at the same time and must make quick decisions to ensure the safety of the aircraft. For example, a controller might direct one aircraft on its landing approach while providing another aircraft with weather information.

The following are examples of types of air traffic controllers:

Tower controllers direct the movement of vehicles on runways and taxiways. They check flight plans, give pilots clearance for takeoff or landing, and direct the movement of aircraft and other traffic on the runways and in other parts of the airport. Most work from control towers, watching the traffic they control.

Approach and departure controllers ensure that aircraft traveling within an airport’s airspace maintain minimum separation for safety. They give clearances to enter controlled airspace and hand off control of aircraft to en route controllers. They use radar equipment to monitor flight paths and work in buildings known as Terminal Radar Approach Control Centers (TRACONs). They also provide information to pilots, such as weather conditions and other critical notices.

En route controllers monitor aircraft once they leave an airport’s airspace. They work at air route traffic control centers located throughout the country, which typically are not located at airports.

Technical Operations (Airways Facilities Service)

Technical Operations ensures safety and efficiency in the National Airspace System (NAS) by effectively managing air navigation services and infrastructure.

Technical Operations staff members oversee the following activities and services:

  • Efficient flight services to customers through responsive and cost-effective maintenance of NAS facilities, systems, and equipment
  • Safe, cost-effective, and efficient communications; frequency spectrum engineering; and navigational services for NAS
  • Standard development, evaluation, and certification of NAS procedures and equipment for customers worldwide
  • Infrastructure management including policy, programming, requirements, engineering, integration and implementation support, service life extension, and maintenance support

Primary Occupations:

  • Airway Transportation Systems Specialist (FG-2101)
    • Navigational Aids
    • Communications
    • Automation
    • Surveillance (RADAR)

Primary Airways Transportation System Specialist duties:

Airway Transportation Systems Specialists (ATSS) perform in the capacity of highly specialized electronics technicians The primary responsibilities of this position are associated with the installation, maintenance, modification and certification of communications, navigational aids, environmental, radar or automation fields.

Airway Transportation Systems Specialists (ATSS) install, maintain, modify and certify electronic equipment and lighting aids associated with facilities and services required for aviation navigation to assure a reliable, safe, and smooth flow of air traffic. This involves work with radar, communications, automation, and navigational aids equipment as well as airport lighting aids and electrical/mechanical equipment supporting facilities on and off airports within the network of the National Airspace System.

It includes periodic maintenance (inspection and analysis of equipment with associated adjustments), modification, corrective maintenance, troubleshooting, repair and replacement of malfunctioning equipment, and certification. ATSSs may be required to maintain entire facilities, including electronic equipment, electrical power distribution, emergency backup power conditioning systems, and heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) systems; electronic equipment only; or power and HVAC systems only.

Flight Standards Service

The Flight Standards Service promotes safe air transportation by setting the standards for certification and oversight of airmen, air operators, air agencies, and designees. They also promote safety of flight of civil aircraft and air commerce by:

  • Accomplishing certification, inspection, surveillance, investigation, and enforcement
  • Setting regulations and standards
  • Managing the system for registration of civil aircraft and all airmen records

Primary Occupations:

  • Aviation Safety Inspector (FG-1825)
  • Air Carrier Operations
  • Air Carrier Avionics
  • Air Carrier Maintenance

Primary Aviation Safety Inspector duties:

Aviation Safety Inspectors in these specialties apply knowledge and skills typically acquired as repairman of aircraft, aircraft parts, or avionics equipment to develop and administer regulations and safety standards pertaining to the airworthiness and maintenance of aircraft and related equipment. They engage primarily in the following types of assignments:

(a) Evaluating mechanics and repair facilities for initial certification and continuing adequacy

(b) evaluating the mechanic`s training program

(c) inspecting aircraft and related equipment for airworthiness

(d) evaluating the maintenance aspects of programs of air carriers and similar commercial operations. The evaluations may include the adequacy of maintenance facilities, equipment and procedures; the competence of employees; the adequacy of the program or schedule for periodic maintenance and overhauls; and the airworthiness of the aircraft. Aviation Safety Inspectors (Airworthiness) may perform a variety of other inspections, investigations and advisory duties. However the primary requirement for positions in this specialty is knowledge and skill pertaining to the maintenance and airworthiness of aircraft. Inspectors are required to travel frequently and to occasionally work irregular duty hours.

The next article in this series will include an interview with an air traffic controller (FG-2152) from LaGuardia International Airport located in New York City, NY.

Credit

Other Career Information

Helpful Career Planning Tools 

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The information provided may not cover all aspects of unique or special circumstances, federal and postal regulations, and programs are subject to change. Our articles and replies are time sensitive. Over time, various dynamic human resource guidance and factors relied upon as a basis for this article may change. The advice and strategies contained herein may not be suitable for your situation and this service is not affiliated with OPM, the postal service or any federal entity. You should consult with school counselors, hiring agency personnel offices, and human resource professionals where appropriate. Neither the publisher or author shall be liable for any loss or any other commercial damages, including but not limited to special, incidental, consequential, or other damages.

Posted in Applying For Jobs, Civil Service Tests, Federal Career Exploration, Federal Employees, Federal Jobs, Job Interviews, Job Qualifications, Job Vacancies, Overseas Jobs

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Posted on Wednesday, 1st June 2016 by

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Job-hunting can be an exciting activity, especially in good times as we enjoy now. This may fly in the face of the negative reports you hear about the job market from the talking heads on TV, candidates for public office, and others who have an agenda. To put it all in perspective, good news does sell newspapers and magazines, or boost TV ratings. It is bad news, true or contrived, that makes the headlines. We will elect a new president and many new members of congress in 2016 so expect to hear about the “terrible job market” as candidates continue to invent and trumpet “bad news.” In reality, good times are rolling, and veterans who know how to go about job hunting will find work that brings a good salary and job satisfaction.

Jobs_Ch3

However, what about the many job candidates who complain they have not found anything after submitting hundreds of resumes to multiple job boards? Well, job hunting is more than preparing a dynamite resume and sending it to internet job boards. Job-hunting is really an operation. It begins with writing a well-defined objective followed by written strategies to accomplish that objective. Writing a good resume is only one activity in this process. Let’s take it step by step.

THE JOB HUNTING OBJECTIVE

First, define your objective. A well-defined objective will keep your job search focused. It is not merely stating, “to find a job that pays well and will be satisfying.” That is a flawed objective. For example, after much self-examination you learn that you are interested in sports and in meeting people. You are a true extrovert. In addition, you played on school and military teams and you were considered a team leader. With this particular interest and knowledge of sports, a job with a professional team would be a good place to look for a job. Now, your objective might read, “To find a marketing or sales position with a professional athletic team.” If you live in the Northeast Corridor, your target could be any of the following: the Philadelphia Phillies, New York Yankees; Washington Redskins; or the Pittsburgh Penguins. If you live in the Midwest, look at the Chicago White Sox and the Minnesota Vikings. West Coast residents can target the Los Angeles Dodgers and many other pro teams.

JOB HUNTING STRATEGIES

After defining your objective, the next step in the operation is to design strategies for accomplishing the mission. Here are some general strategies to get you started:

  • Prepare an operations center, (aka, home office) in your home to conduct your job search.
  • Craft a resume that translates your military experience into civilian terminology.
  • Post your profile on LinkedIn. Make sure it is in harmony your resume. Join the LinkedIn Veterans User Group
  • Research the websites of your target Military Friendly companies for job opportunities in your area of interest.
  • Learn the names of the president, hiring managers and human resources director by conducting a google search, reviewing the company website, and reviewing LinkedIn.
  • Check your local convention center website to learn about upcoming trade shows or conferences. Attend conferences of interest to meet hiring managers personally.
  • Practice for interviews by playing question-answer with a trusted friend. Learn to speak using civilian terminology.
  • Learn what is considered appropriate dress for attending trade shows and interviews.
  • Become technology literate, and prepare to articulate your technology skills to hiring managers and human resources directors.
  • Ask for the support of previous co-workers and bosses who will speak to your abilities and character. It will help your cause if you include a letter of reference along with your resume.

These are general strategies. Flesh them out to meet a particular situation. In future blogs on this site, I will go into detail on these general operation strategies. In the meantime, make this your cardinal rule for job hunting: Employers do not hire resumes, Tweets or Facebook postings. They hire veterans who contacted them personally to present their candidacy. Securing a job is all about building personal relationships.

ROBUST INDUSTRIES AND COMPANIES

In addition to the basic three industries, food, shelter, clothing, there are other industries offering plentiful job opportunities. Two of the best are Travel and Entertainment, and Insurance. There industries provide jobs spanning everything from Assistant Marketing Services Representative, to Sr.Vice President for Sales, to President.

TRAVEL AND ENTERTAINMENT

This is what I call a happy industry. It is increasing exponentially and includes guided tours, ocean cruising, professional sports, theme parks, TV and radio programming, and the movies. Here are some of my favorite companies in this industry.

Baltimore Orioles

In addition to fielding a winning team and having a profitable balance sheet, this team is community conscious and employee friendly. When I checked their website, www.baltimore.orioles.mlb.com, I found the following openings: Information Systems Assistant; Spanish Translator and Media Relations Assistant.

Another place to look for jobs in major league baseball is a website called MLB Team Careers.    www.mlb.mlb.com/careers/index.jsp. This is a clearinghouse for jobs offered by every major league baseball team. Recently, I found the following interesting job postings: Director of Human Resources, Kansas City Royals; Executive Legal assistant, Philadelphia Phillies; After School Academy Baseball Coordinator, Washington Nationals; Cybersecurity Network Administrator, Chicago White Sox.

CNBC

This TV channel is the premier spot for financial news and telecasts a variety of programs every weekday from six AM to seven PM. The TV hosts are knowledgeable in everything financial including employment matters. When I reviewed their website, www.cnbc.com, I found the following job postings: Producer; Strategic Content Analyst; Publicist; Reporter; Director of Marketing, and many more

The Walt Disney Company

Disney is the global leader in family entertainment and has been in business for 90 years. It offers employment at many different levels at locations around the world. It enjoys a sterling reputation for customer service and for treating employees like family. In addition, Disney is a Military Friendly company. To learn about current job openings, go to the website, www.disney.com, click on careers and then open “Heroes Work Here.”

INSURANCE

Many workers consider the Insurance industry a boring place to carve out a career. Forget everything you have ever heard about the Insurance industry because this is one of the best for long-term employment. Why? Insurance companies have been in business for hundreds of years because customers and employees benefit from their services. The reason why insurance companies rarely go out of business is that some of the brightest workers in the world called actuaries build their business model. They assess risk by evaluating hundreds of variables and then pricing their products, policies and annuities, accordingly. Here are some of my faves.

United Services Automobile Association (USAA)

The United Services Automobile Association is a Military Friendly multiline insurer that hires veterans by the hundreds for jobs in every state. Visit their website. www.USSA.com, for recent job postings. They not only cater to veterans, but also to their spouses. Check out their Junior Military Officer (JMO) program, which helps veterans through their transition to civilian careers.

Northwestern Mutual

Northwestern specializes in life and property insurance, and is based in Milwaukee Wisconsin. It has been in business since 1907, employs over 6,000 workers and has assets totaling $120 billion. The story does not stop there. The company is community conscious in the extreme. One of their hallmark programs, the Northwestern Mutual Foundation, provides funding to find a cure for childhood cancer. Check the website for job opportunities, www.northwesternmutual.com

State Farm Insurance Company

State Farm is a multiline insurer working across the country. It is the nation’s largest automobile insurance company. Jobs at State Farm include selling, marketing, claims adjustment, underwriting and other specialties. Their sales offices are are independently owned and operated by agents and their family members. See what they have to offer at www.statefarm.com.

MassMutual

This multiline insurer has been in business since 1851, which indicates it is doing something right for both employees and customers. Few companies in America have been in business for 165 years! In 2016, MassMutual’s dividend payout to policyholders exceeded $1.7 billion. It ranks in the top one hundred companies in the Fortune 500 List and is highly rated for providing executive employment opportunities for women. MassMutual provides multi-million dollar support for many community initiatives and is highly ranked for diversity employment.

MassMutual has earned Military Friendly status from several ranking organizations, including Military.com, G.I. Jobs Magazine, and Military Spouse (www.militaryspouse.com). The company is firmly committed to helping military veterans and their spouses make the transition to civilian employment. To view job opportunities go to, www.MassMutual.com.

MOVING FORWARD

In our July newsletter, we will explore methods for learning about your interests and abilities and how to channel them toward career goals. In addition, we will list additional robust industries and companies offering job opportunities for veterans.

TAKEAWAYS

  • Job-hunting is an operation, not merely a matter of sending resumes to job boards.
  • Construct a job-hunting objective that echoes your interests, abilities and experience.
  • Building a personal relationship with the hiring manager is a vital strategy for winning a job offer.
  • Focus your job hunting efforts on Military Friendly companies.

VETERAN’S RESOURCES

OPERATION JOB SEARCH: A Guide for Military Veterans Transitioning to Civilian Careers. John Henry Weiss. Skyhorse Publishing Inc. c 2016

Networking for Veterans: A Guidebook for a Successful Military Transition into the Civilian Workforce. Michael Faulkner and Andrea Nierenberg. Pearson Learning Solutions. c 2012

Helpful Career Planning Tools 

Visit our other informative site

The information provided may not cover all aspects of unique or special circumstances, federal and postal regulations, and programs are subject to change. Our articles and replies are time sensitive. Over time, various dynamic human resource guidance and factors relied upon as a basis for this article may change. The advice and strategies contained herein may not be suitable for your situation and this service is not affiliated with OPM, the postal service or any federal entity. You should consult with school counselors, hiring agency personnel offices, and human resource professionals where appropriate. Neither the publisher or author shall be liable for any loss or any other commercial damages, including but not limited to special, incidental, consequential, or other damages.

Posted in Applying For Jobs, Federal Career Exploration, Federal Jobs, Job Interviews, Job Qualifications, Job Vacancies, Veterans Preference

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Posted on Monday, 23rd May 2016 by

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Astronauts are probably the most recognized occupation at NASA. Since the beginning of the space program, they have provided an opportunity for people who wanted to explore the galaxy.

Astronauts are recruited in the GS-0801 job series and NASA has selected more than 300 astronauts to fly on its increasingly challenging missions to explore space and benefit life on Earth. More will be needed to crew future ISS missions, as well as, the missions beyond low earth orbit.

In this final article in this series, we interviewed Barry E. “Butch” Wilmore, a Navy Captain, who is an aviator and astronaut assigned to the Johnson Space Flight Center, in Houston, TX. The name “Butch” is his Navy Call sign which followed him to NASA.

 

Astronaut Barry Wilmore

Astronaut Barry Wilmore

According to the NASA website, “The term “astronaut” is derived from the Greek words meaning “space sailor,” and refers to all who have been launched as crew members aboard NASA spacecraft bound for orbit and beyond.”

The next class of astronauts may fly on any of four different U.S. spacecraft during their careers: the International Space Station (ISS), two new commercial spacecraft being built by U.S. companies, and NASA’s Orion deep-space exploration vehicle. NASA is in the midst of an unprecedented transition to using commercial spacecraft for its scheduled crew and cargo transport to the ISS. For the last 15 years, humans have been living continuously aboard the orbiting laboratory, expanding scientific knowledge and demonstrating new technologies. Future crewmembers will continue this work.

Additionally, the Space Launch System rocket and Orion spacecraft, now in development, will launch astronauts on missions to the proving ground of lunar orbit where NASA will learn to conduct complex operations in a deep space environment before moving on to longer duration missions on the journey to Mars.

Q&A with Barry E. “Butch” Wilmore

Why did you become an astronaut?

I joined the U.S. Navy with a desire to do my part for my Country and eventually attained sufficient qualifications to apply to NASA as a Shuttle Pilot Astronaut. With a desire to continue to serve this great nation while continuing to fly, it was obvious that you can’t fly any higher or faster than a Space Shuttle … so I decided to apply and was eventually selected.

What is the most exciting event as an astronaut?

There can be no one most exciting event as spaceflight is filled with continuous “WOW” moments on almost a daily basis. Just realizing that for a time you’ve left the confines of earth and are no longer a member of that global family is daunting in and of itself. Of course the initial moments of weightlessness following a thrilling Shuttle launch, hand flying the Space Shuttle around the International Space Station (ISS) and spending 25 ½ hours outside the ISS during 4 spacewalks are certainly some of the highlights I’ll always remember.

What is most challenging about being an astronaut?

Balance. As an Astronaut one has so many responsibilities and expectations that maintaining the necessary balance of life is always a challenge. As an Astronaut I somewhat jokingly say that we’re expected to know everything and perform it well. With those expectations we also have greater responsibilities as Husbands, Wives, Fathers and Mother and to our Lord in service within His church. Maintaining that appropriate balance continually on my mind and is continually a challenge.

What was the most dangerous event as an astronaut?

NASA is filled with dedicated, talented and passionate individuals that make spaceflight and everything else we do appear to be routine when it’s actually all but routine. Everything we do from preparations for launch, the launch itself, on orbit operations, and entry and landing are all so very dangerous. What a terrific blessing to work with professionals whose combined efforts make things so dangerous appear to be routine.

Would you recommend this as a good career choice?

If you seek a position where service to your country is at the top of the list and you’re passionate about being a part something great that has been and will continue to be of great benefit to all mankind, then the choice of Astronaut is the position for you.

What else would you like to add about being an astronaut?

The views of earth from space are literally out of this world !!!!!

General Program Requirements

In the article on the recruitment of astronauts for the Mars program, we discussed qualifications, and education that is required to be an astronaut. Here are some additional requirements to be aware of.

Selected applicants will be designated astronaut candidates and will be assigned to the Astronaut Office at the Johnson Space Center, Houston, Texas.  The astronaut candidates will undergo a training and evaluation period lasting approximately 2 years, during which time they will participate in the basic astronaut candidate training program, which is designated to develop the knowledge and skills required for formal mission training upon selection for a flight. Astronaut candidates (with jet piloting backgrounds) will maintain proficiency in NASA aircraft during their candidate period.

As part of the astronaut candidate training program, astronaut candidates are required to complete military water survival before beginning their flying syllabus, and become SCUBA qualified to prepare them for the EVA training.  Consequently, all astronaut candidates will be required to pass a swimming test.

Applicants should be aware that selection as an astronaut candidate does not ensure selection as an astronaut.  Final selection as an astronaut will depend upon satisfactory completion of the training and evaluation period. Graduation from the astronaut candidate program will require successful completion of the following: International Space Station systems training, Extravehicular Activity skills training, Robotics skills training, Russian language training, and aircraft flight readiness training.

Being an astronaut is one of many great job opportunities, but it is not the only one. Go and explore what NASA has to offer!

Credits

  • Angela D. Storey, Public Affairs Officer, Marshall Space Flight Center
  • Photos provided by NASA
  • NASA website: www.nasa.gov

Other Career Information

Helpful Career Planning Tools 

Visit our other informative site

The information provided may not cover all aspects of unique or special circumstances, federal and postal regulations, and programs are subject to change. Our articles and replies are time sensitive. Over time, various dynamic human resource guidance and factors relied upon as a basis for this article may change. The advice and strategies contained herein may not be suitable for your situation and this service is not affiliated with OPM, the postal service or any federal entity. You should consult with school counselors, hiring agency personnel offices, and human resource professionals where appropriate. Neither the publisher or author shall be liable for any loss or any other commercial damages, including but not limited to special, incidental, consequential, or other damages.

Posted in Applying For Jobs, Federal Career Exploration, Federal Employees, Federal Jobs, Job Qualifications, Job Vacancies

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Posted on Wednesday, 18th May 2016 by

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When we hear about delays at airports more often than not the delays are due to the airlines not meeting their scheduled arrival and departure times for a multitude of reasons. The delays are caused by weather, mechanical breakdowns, and other factors. Today’s delays are due to insufficient staffing of Transportation Safety Officers, SV-1802 job series positions, at airport choke points across the nations such as O’Hare airport in Chicago. The TSA is hiring hundreds of Transportation Security Officers nationwide to fill the gap. These TSA job openings will be crucial in handling these long delays.

 

Airport Metal Detector

Airport Metal Detector

The Transportation Security Agency (TSA) was transferred from the Department of Transportation to the Department of Homeland Security after the September 11th attack. I was a manager at the Greater Pittsburgh International Airport’s air traffic control tower when the TSA was transferred and I felt the move premature.

Regardless of who is managing the program the fact of the matter is that over 700 new Transportation Security Officers are needed and the TSA is hiring. They have numerous job announcements open now until the end of May and throughout the year as vacancies occur. This is a job that requires a high school education for the most part and the officer’s starting salary ranges from $15.13 to as high as $23.66 per hour with generous benefits. These TSA jobs will be available nationwide.

Selectees are required to travel a minimum of two (2) weeks in a full-time duty status to attend TSA’s New Hire training. New Hire training and travel requirements vary by duty location and may require up to six (6) weeks of full-time duty status travel. This training will occur away from the employee’s airport of record and employees are paid for compensable hours and reimbursed for authorized travel expenses. While employed with TSA, other occasional travel may be required.

Transportation Security Officers (TSOs) provide security and protection of air travelers, airports and aircraft in a courteous and professional manner. This includes:

  • Operating various screening equipment and technology to identify dangerous objects in baggage, cargo and on passengers, and preventing those objects from being transported onto aircraft.
  • Performing searches and screening, which may include physical interaction with passengers (e.g., pat-downs, search of property, etc.), conducting bag searches and lifting/carrying bags, bins, and property weighing up to 70lbs.
  • Controlling terminal entry and exit points.
  • Interacting with the public, giving directions and responding to inquiries.
  • Maintaining focus and awareness while working in a stressful environment which includes noise from alarms, machinery and people, crowd distractions, time pressure, and disruptive and angry passengers, in order to preserve the professional ability to identify and locate potentially life threatening or mass destruction devices, and to make effective decisions in both crisis and routine situations.
  • Engaging in continuous development of critical thinking skills, necessary to mitigate actual and potential security threats, by identifying, evaluating, and applying appropriate situational options and approaches. This may include application of risk-based security screening protocols that vary based on program requirements.
  • Retaining and implementing knowledge of all applicable Standard Operating Procedures, demonstrating responsible and dependable behavior, and is open to change and adapts to new information or unexpected obstacles.

Key Requirements

  • Be a U.S. Citizen or U.S. National at time of application submission
  • Be at least 18 years of age at time of application submission
  • Pass a Drug Screening and Medical Evaluation
  • Pass a background investigation including a credit and criminal check
  • No default on $7,500 or more in delinquent debt (but for some bankruptcies)
  • Selective Service registration required

Qualifications

Applicants must meet these qualifications in order to be further evaluated in the TSO hiring process:

  • Have a high school diploma or General Educational Development (GED) credential OR at least one year of full-time work experience in the security industry, aviation screening, or as an X-ray technician
  • Be proficient in the English language (i.e., able to read, write, speak, and comprehend)

Current Job Openings

Job announcements are now open from 5/18/ to 5/31/2016 so you have to act NOW. Click on the following link to learn more about TSA jobs and to find job vacancy announcements. Positons can be advertised at any time as vacancies occur.  Check for open job announcements frequently.

Helpful Career Planning Tools 

Visit our other informative site

The information provided may not cover all aspects of unique or special circumstances, federal and postal regulations, and programs are subject to change. Our articles and replies are time sensitive. Over time, various dynamic human resource guidance and factors relied upon as a basis for this article may change. The advice and strategies contained herein may not be suitable for your situation and this service is not affiliated with OPM, the postal service or any federal entity. You should consult with school counselors, hiring agency personnel offices, and human resource professionals where appropriate. Neither the publisher or author shall be liable for any loss or any other commercial damages, including but not limited to special, incidental, consequential, or other damages.

Posted in Applying For Jobs, Civil Service Tests, Federal Career Exploration, Federal Jobs, Job Qualifications, Job Vacancies, Law Enforcement jobs

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Posted on Friday, 13th May 2016 by

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NASA Engineering Jobs

One of the most important job occupations at NASA are their engineers. They use professional engineering theories, principles, practices and techniques to coordinate and manage professional engineering projects. In this article I interviewed Melvin McKinistry, who is a general engineer and a master planning team lead at the Facilities Management Office for the Marshall Space Flight Center.

 

Melvin McKinistry, General Engineer, NASA

Melvin McKinistry, General Engineer, NASA

 

This series covers positions managing, supervising, leading, and/or performing professional engineering and scientific work. This series is applicable when the work of the position:

  • requires knowledge and skills in two or more professional engineering series within the Engineering and Architecture Group, 0800, and no one discipline is paramount; or
  • is consistent with engineering work in this occupational group, but is not covered by an established series.

The federal government employs 25,661 general engineers or interdisciplinary engineers of which 400 work overseas. The Department of the Army, Air Force and Navy are the largest employers with 13,677 civilians followed by NASA with 3,123 and the Department of Defense with 1,495. All cabinet level agencies except for the Department of Education and some large independent agencies employ general engineers.

Q&A Melvin McKinistry

What does a Master Planner actually do?

The master planner is responsible for developing, communicating, and implementing the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Master Plan. The Master Plan is Marshall’s concept for the strategic management and future development of the Center’s real property assets, and infrastructure. The master planner is responsible for developing, communicating, and implementing the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Master Plan. The Master Plan is anchored by the objective that the Center will right size its assets and have high performing facilities and infrastructure to support current and future missions. The master planner accomplishes this task by leading the right studies that produce technical reports and solutions to guide decision-making about infrastructure.

What is the most challenging project you have had to work on?

The master planning process itself is very challenging. One of the master planner’s primary task is to engage multiple stakeholders. Each stakeholder may have their own objectives, and desired outcomes. It is the job of the master planner to connect with each stakeholder and find a common trajectory that is aligned with the Agency’s mission and goals. Although challenging, the rewards and outcomes are worth it!

What was the most dangerous project as a Master Planner?

As the Master Planner, you are primarily a strategic thinker and planner. The most dangerous project for a master planner is not to have a master plan! The master plan is the result of a vision supported by strategic planning that provides a pathway to meet current and future challenges yet unknown. Without a master plan that is supported by key stakeholders, an organization’s future is left only to chance. NASA’s mission is much too important to be left only to chance, fortunately our leadership understands the value of visioning and strategic planning.

Would you recommend the job occupation of General Engineer?

I would highly recommend the job occupation of Engineer. It will take talented engineers to solve the world’s problem and continue to propel the human race forward. There will continue to exist numerous technological challenges, and problems that must be solved to improve and sustain life on earth as we know it. This realization will present great opportunities for future engineers and scientist. These opportunities and possibilities will only be limited by our visions, dreams, aspirations, and most of all our compassion for all mankind!

What else would you like to add about being a Master Planner for Marshall Space Flight Center?

It is a privilege, and an honor to work at NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center as the Master Planner. It is a great feeling to know that you are working with a talented and diverse workforce that is responsible for engineering and building the spacecraft that will take man to Mars and beyond. It is part of my job to make sure the next generation inherits the right facilities, and infrastructure to continue this bold mission.

Engineering & Architecture Group (GS-0800)

The GS-0801 General Engineer Series is included in the GS-0800 group which includes all classes of positions, the duties of which are to advise on, administer, supervise, or perform professional, scientific, or technical work concerned with engineering or architectural projects, facilities, structures, systems, processes, equipment, devices, material or methods. Positions in this group require knowledge of the science or art, or both, by which materials, natural resources, and power are made useful.

There are 129,130 federal engineers and architects employed in the GS-0800 Engineering and Architectural Group within most Executive Branch departments and large independent agencies including the EPA (1,994), NASA (10,602), the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (1,768), and the SBA (494). The largest employers are the Department of Navy and Army which employs over 66,000 civilians in this group. All of the cabinet level agencies with the exception of the Department of Education employ workers in the GS-0800 group with mechanical and civil engineers employing over 11,000 each. The majority of Nuclear Engineers work for the Department of the Navy, Department of Energy, and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission.

Don’t overlook any agency in your search for engineering jobs as there are small numbers employed in this group spread throughout government.  For example, the Federal Communications Commission employs 268 from this group while as few as 6 are employed by the Securities and Exchange Commission.

Additional Information on the GS-801 General Engineer Series

  • You must be a U.S. citizen to apply
  • GS-12 salary range is from $71,012.00 to $92,316.00 / Per Year

BASIC REQUIREMENTS:

A.  Bachelor’s or higher degree obtained from an accredited college or university, which included a major in engineering. To be acceptable, the curriculum must: (1) be in a school of engineering with at least one curriculum accredited by the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET) as a professional engineering curriculum; or (2) include differential and integral calculus and courses (more advanced than first-year physics and chemistry) in five of the following seven areas of engineering science or physics: (a) statics, dynamics; (b) strength of materials (stress-strain relationships); (c) fluid mechanics, hydraulics; (d) thermodynamics; (e) electrical fields and circuits; (f) nature and properties of materials (relating particle and aggregate structure to properties); and (g) any other comparable area of fundamental engineering science or physics, such as optics, heat transfer, soil mechanics, or electronics.

B.  Combination of education and experience — college-level education, training, and/or technical experience that furnished (1) a thorough knowledge of the physical and mathematical sciences underlying professional engineering, and (2) a good understanding, both theoretical and practical, of the engineering sciences and techniques and their applications to one of the branches of engineering. The adequacy of such background must be demonstrated by one of the following:

1.  Professional registration — Current registration as a professional engineer by any State, the District of Columbia, Guam, or Puerto Rico. Absent other means of qualifying under this standard, those applicants who achieved such registration by means other than written test (e.g., State grandfather or eminence provisions) are eligible only for positions that are within or closely related to the specialty field of their registration. For example, an applicant who attains registration through a State Board’s eminence provision as a manufacturing engineer typically would be rated eligible only for manufacturing engineering positions.

2.  Written Test — Evidence of having successfully passed the Engineer-in-Training (EIT) examination, or the written test required for professional registration, which is administered by the Boards of Engineering Examiners in the various States, the District of Columbia, Guam, and Puerto Rico.

Applicants who have passed the EIT examination and have completed all the requirements for either (a) a bachelor’s degree in engineering technology (BET) from an accredited college or university that included 60 semester hours of courses in the physical, mathematical, and engineering sciences, or (b) a BET from a program accredited by the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET) may be rated eligible for certain engineering positions at GS-5. Eligibility is limited to positions that are within or closely related to the specialty field of the engineering technology program. Applicants for positions that involve highly technical research, development, or similar functions requiring an advanced level of competence in basic science must meet the basic requirements in paragraph A.

Because of the diversity in kind and quality of BET programs, graduates of other BET programs are required to complete at least 1 year of additional education or highly technical work experience of such nature as to provide reasonable assurance of the possession of the knowledge, skills, and abilities required for professional engineering competence. The adequacy of this background must be demonstrated by passing the EIT examination.

3. Specified academic courses — Successful completion of at least 60 semester hours of courses in the physical, mathematical, and engineering sciences and in engineering that included the courses specified in the basic requirements. The courses must be fully acceptable toward meeting the requirements of a professional engineering curriculum as described in paragraph A.

4. Related curriculum — Successful completion of a curriculum leading to a bachelor’s degree in engineering technology or in an appropriate professional field, e.g., physics, chemistry, architecture, computer science, mathematics, hydrology, or geology, may be accepted in lieu of a degree in engineering, provided the applicant has had at least 1 year of professional engineering experience acquired under professional engineering supervision and guidance. Ordinarily there should be either an established plan of intensive training to develop professional engineering competence, or several years of prior professional engineering-type experience, e.g., in interdisciplinary positions. (The above examples of related curricula are not all-inclusive.)

The general engineer plays a vital role in helping NASA accomplish their mission of space exploration. In our final article in this series we will have a Q&A with Barry E. “Butch” Whitmore, Navy Captain, Aviator and Astronaut assigned to the Johnson Space Center in Houston, TX and “Butch” is his Navy Call sign which followed him to NASA.

Credits

  • Angela D. Storey, Public Affairs Officer, Marshall Space Flight Center
  • Photos provided by NASA
  • NASA website: www.nasa.gov

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