Posted on Friday, 20th April 2018 by

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The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) is hiring hundreds of criminal investigators, deportation officers, Customs and Border Protection officers, Border Patrol agents, special agents, physical security specialists, police officers, emergency management specialists, intelligence analysts, and more. If you know someone who is interested in a rewarding career in law enforcement let them know about these opportunities and have them participate in one of their upcoming webinar recruiting sessions. The webinars will provide information on DHS career opportunities; the law enforcement hiring process and timelines; special hiring authorities; effective resume writing; and how to create a profile on USAJOBS. These two-hour webinars will be offered twelve times over the next two months and they are open to the public. They start April 23 running through June 20, 2018. Register to attend one of the webinars.

For all other law enforcement jobs review the occupational summary and qualifications and then search the current vacancy listings for positions in your area. We link direct to USAJob listings from our occupational profiles. The federal government employs thousands of law enforcement personnel in more than 40 job series.  Review the occupational profiles and the number employed at each agency for the top 24 jobs to see where you might fit in.

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The information provided may not cover all aspects of unique or special circumstances, federal and postal regulations, and programs are subject to change. Our articles and replies are time sensitive. Over time, various dynamic human resource guidance and factors relied upon as a basis for this article may change. The advice and strategies contained herein may not be suitable for your situation and this service is not affiliated with OPM, the postal service or any federal entity. You should consult with school counselors, hiring agency personnel offices, and human resource professionals where appropriate. Neither the publisher or author shall be liable for any loss or any other commercial damages, including but not limited to special, incidental, consequential, or other damages.

 

 

Posted in Applying For Jobs, Civil Service Tests, Federal Career Exploration, Federal Jobs, Job Interviews, Job Qualifications, Law Enforcement jobs, Resumes / KSAs

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Posted on Sunday, 15th April 2018 by

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The Office of Management and Budget is focusing on a new way to reward and retain high performers. These government employees will likely benefit from this new structure as it seeks to replace older, more inefficient processes and focus on new initiatives. Essential skills, high performance and targeted pay incentives are the baseline for this new and improved pay plan; funding is being proposed for the 2018-2019 plans for implementation. Additionally, each Agency can work to create innovative and exciting rating systems to reward and retain employees with critical skills, knowledge and abilities. Further, monies will be provided to support robust training and education programs that focus on enhancing performance; opportunities to pilot new efficiencies, processes and procedures are being provided and encouraged across the federal government and beyond.

Specifically, the plan will enhance rewards and incentives so that organizations can retain high performers and most importantly, those with the best skill mix. In order to accomplish this, agencies will have flexibility with any number of innovations. Some may choose to elect pay banding which is accomplished by consolidating the GS system’s 15 grades into a limited number of pay bands, usually four or five Pay Bands or perhaps change ratings to a pass/fail system. The Federal Aviation Administration has used a core compensation alternative pay system incorporating pay bands since the late 1990s. Additionally, others may opt for the ability to offer cash awards for critical skills…and the list goes on and on. Developmental programs are being refined in each of these areas to determine which system works best for each particular agency based on the skills, knowledge and abilities required for those missions.

Recognizing employees for their performance is a critical piece to a successful mission; these new opportunities to alter the plans to the most appropriate solution are a good one. New forward leaning ideas will arise, and communication, collaboration and information sharing increased. Measures will be implemented so as to ensure compliance and accountability with the new system and to ensure it is working properly.

In conjunction with the new pay system, many companies are opting to revisit their education and training programs. Skill mix and development are critical to many of these mission sets and therefore, hiring and performance assessments are key to their success. By revisiting many of these education and training plans, agencies can provide additional opportunities and coursework that will in turn, enhance performance. The link to the new pay system and education and training is critical and one that should go hand in hand with the implementation of new performance requirements. This system will encourage employees to develop creative Individual Development Plans (IDPs) to improve their skill sets and be rewarded with higher pay and awards as they accomplish their targeted goals.

Many organizations are providing additional funding for coursework, on the job training, college programs and skill enhancement initiatives that foster increased performance. These opportunities, particularly in the area of information systems, cybersecurity, science, technology, engineering and math, for many of the agencies, are increasing performance and providing a more holistic way forward for the organization in meeting their goals and objectives.

Although each approach may vary, agencies will have the ability to implement what makes the most sense to them; they will now have the flexibility to  appropriately reward employees for performance and meet the needs of their mission. Each will need to ensure they work to establish a mechanism as well, to measure success; feedback on these new processes and procedures are critical and must be captured so that that they can make adjustments, as necessary.

References:

Career Planning Tools

The information provided may not cover all aspects of unique or special circumstances, federal and postal regulations, and programs are subject to change. Our articles and replies are time sensitive. Over time, various dynamic human resource guidance and factors relied upon as a basis for this article may change. The advice and strategies contained herein may not be suitable for your situation and this service is not affiliated with OPM, the postal service or any federal entity. You should consult with school counselors, hiring agency personnel offices, and human resource professionals where appropriate. Neither the publisher or author shall be liable for any loss or any other commercial damages, including but not limited to special, incidental, consequential, or other damages.

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Posted in Applying For Jobs, Federal Career Exploration, Federal Employees, Federal Jobs, Job Qualifications, Post Office Jobs, Veterans Preference

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Posted on Sunday, 8th April 2018 by

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The federal government employs 1,325 materials engineers. The Departments of the Army, Navy, and Air force employ 825 civilians followed by NASA with 284, and the DOD with 90. The Department of Commerce employs 80 and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission employs 56. A few other cabinet level agencies employ small numbers for this occupation.

This series covers positions managing, supervising, leading, and/or performing professional engineering and scientific work to:

  • Determine and advise on a material’s essential composition, atomic and molecular configuration, and processing;
  • Relate the material’s essential composition to its properties, end use, and performance in engineering, architecture, and scientific applications and programs;
  • Examine the interaction of materials in their processes and applications, taking into account the associated equipment, systems, components, and their fabrication, design, or use;
  • Develop, maintain, and apply materials and material solutions to meet certain mechanical, electrical, environmental, and chemical requirements; and/or
  • Test and evaluate substances for new applications.

Government Requirements:

You must be U.S. citizen to apply.

The yearly salary for a GS-13 is $87,252 to $113,428.

Typical Duties and Occupational Profile:

Materials engineers work with metals, ceramics, and plastics to create new materials.

Materials engineers develop, process, and test materials used to create a range of products from computer chips and aircraft wings to golf clubs and biomedical devices. They study the properties and structures of metals, ceramics, plastics, composites, nano-materials (extremely small substances), and other substances in order to create new materials that meet certain mechanical, electrical, and chemical requirements. They also help select materials for specific products and develop new ways to use existing materials.

Duties

Materials engineers typically do the following:

  • Plan and evaluate new projects, consulting with other engineers and managers as necessary
  • Prepare proposals and budgets, analyze labor costs, write reports, and perform other managerial tasks
  • Supervise the work of technologists, technicians, and other engineers and scientists
  • Design and direct the testing of processing procedures
  • Monitor how materials perform and evaluate how they deteriorate
  • Determine causes of product failure and develop ways of overcoming such failure
  • Evaluate technical specifications and economic factors relating to the design objectives of processes or products
  • Evaluate the impact of materials processing on the environment

Materials engineers create and study materials at the atomic level. They use computers to understand and model the characteristics of materials and their components. They solve problems in several different engineering fields, such as mechanical, chemical, electrical, civil, nuclear, and aerospace.

Materials engineers may specialize in understanding specific types of materials. The following are examples of types of materials engineers:

Ceramic engineers develop ceramic materials and the processes for making them into useful products, from high-temperature rocket nozzles to glass for LCD flat-panel displays.

Composites engineers develop materials with special, engineered properties for applications in aircraft, automobiles, and related products.

Metallurgical engineers specialize in metals, such as steel and aluminum, usually in alloyed form with additions of other elements to provide specific properties.

Plastics engineers develop and test new plastics, known as polymers, for new applications.

Semiconductor processing engineers apply materials science and engineering principles to develop new microelectronic materials for computing, sensing, and related applications.

Materials engineers plan and evaluate new projects, consulting with others as necessary.

Materials engineers must have a bachelor’s degree in materials science and engineering or in a related engineering field. Completing internships and cooperative engineering programs while in school can be helpful in getting a position as a materials engineer.

 

Education

Students interested in studying materials engineering should take high school courses in math, such as algebra, trigonometry, and calculus; in science, such as biology, chemistry, and physics; and in computer programming.

Entry-level jobs as a materials engineer require a bachelor’s degree. Bachelor’s degree programs include classroom and laboratory work focusing on engineering principles.

Some colleges and universities offer a 5-year program leading to both a bachelor’s and master’s degree. A graduate degree allows an engineer to work as a post-secondary teacher or to do research and development.

Many colleges and universities offer internships and cooperative programs in partnership with industry. In these programs, students gain practical experience while completing their education.

Many engineering programs are accredited by ABET. Some employers prefer to hire candidates who have graduated from an accredited program. A degree from an ABET-accredited program is usually necessary to become a licensed professional engineer.

Important Qualities

Analytical skills. Materials engineers often work on projects related to other fields of engineering. They must determine how materials will be used and how they must be structured to withstand different conditions.

Math skills. Materials engineers use the principles of calculus and other advanced topics in math for analysis, design, and troubleshooting in their work.

Problem-solving skills. Materials engineers must understand the relationship between materials’ structures, their properties, how they are made, and how these factors affect the products they are used to make. They must also figure out why a product might have failed, design a solution, and then conduct tests to make sure that the product does not fail again. These skills involve being able to identify root causes when many factors could be at fault.

Speaking skills. While working with technicians, technologists, and other engineers, materials engineers must state concepts and directions clearly. When speaking with managers, these engineers must also communicate engineering concepts to people who may not have an engineering background.

Writing skills. Materials engineers must write plans and reports clearly so that people without a materials engineering background can understand the concepts.

 

Licenses, Certifications, and Registrations

Licensure for materials engineers is not as common as it is for other engineering occupations, nor it is required for entry-level positions. A Professional Engineering (PE) license, which allows for higher levels of leadership and independence, can be acquired later in one’s career. Licensed engineers are called professional engineers (PEs). A PE can oversee the work of other engineers, sign off on projects, and provide services directly to the public. State licensure generally requires

  • A degree from an ABET-accredited engineering program
  • A passing score on the Fundamentals of Engineering (FE) exam
  • Relevant work experience, typically at least 4 years
  • A passing score on the Professional Engineering (PE) exam

The initial FE exam can be taken after earning a bachelor’s degree. Engineers who pass this exam are commonly called engineers in training (EITs) or engineer interns (EIs). After meeting work experience requirements, EITs and EIs can take the second exam, called the Principles and Practice of Engineering (PE).

Each state issues its own licenses. Most states recognize licensure from other states, as long as the licensing state’s requirements meet or exceed their own licensure requirements. Several states require continuing education for engineers to keep their licenses.

Certification in the field of metallography, the science and art of dealing with the structure of metals and alloys, is available through ASM International and other materials science organizations.

Additional training in fields directly related to metallurgy and materials’ properties, such as corrosion or failure analysis, is available through ASM International.

Other Experience

During high school, students can attend engineering summer camps to see what these and other engineers do. Attending these camps can help students plan their coursework for the remainder of their time in high school.

Advancement

Junior materials engineers usually work under the supervision of experienced engineers. In large companies, new engineers may receive formal training in classrooms or seminars. As engineers gain knowledge and experience, they move on to more difficult projects where they have greater independence to develop designs, solve problems, and make decisions.

Eventually, materials engineers may advance to become technical specialists or to supervise a team of engineers and technicians. Many become engineering managers or move into other managerial positions or sales work. An engineering background is useful in sales because it enables sales engineers to discuss a product’s technical aspects and assist in product planning, installation, and use. For more information, see the profiles on architectural and engineering managers and sales engineers.

GS-0806-Materials Engineer

General qualifications excerpted from Job Announcement WTHI176993975616

Responsibilities

  • Provide technical consulting services to Corps Districts, Department of Defense Major commands and installations relating to airfield and roadway pavement materials and construction.
  • Provide technical consulting to Architect-Engineers (A-E) relating to airfield and roadway pavement materials and construction, with emphasis on materials testing, mix design development and review and batch plant inspections.
  • Provide technical oversight of concrete and asphalt batch plant inspections; concrete uniformity testing; preparatory inspections for all aspects of airfield and roadway paving projects.
  • Inspect and evaluate concrete and asphalt paving test sections.
  • Perform review of construction submittals to include paving equipment, paving plan, and paving materials test results.
  • Perform review for Portland Cement Concrete (PCC) and Hot Mix Asphalt (HMA) mix designs.

Qualifications

Basic Requirement for Materials Engineer (transcripts are required at time of application):

  1. Degree: Bachelor’s degree (or higher degree) in engineering.

(1) lead to a bachelor’s degree (or higher degree) in a school of engineering with at least one program accredited by the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET);

(2) include differential and integral calculus and courses (more advanced than first-year physics and chemistry) in five of the following seven areas of engineering science or physics: (a) statics, dynamics; (b) strength of materials (stress-strain relationships); (c) fluid mechanics, hydraulics; (d) thermodynamics; (e) electrical fields and circuits; (f) nature and properties of materials (relating particle and aggregate structure to properties); and (g) any other comparable area of fundamental engineering science or physics, such as optics, heat transfer, soil mechanics, or electronics.

  1. Combination of Education and Experience: College-level education, training, and/or technical experience that furnished:

(1) a thorough knowledge of the physical and mathematical sciences underlying engineering.

(2) a good understanding, both theoretical and practical, of the engineering sciences and techniques and their applications to one of the branches of engineering. The adequacy of such background must be demonstrated by one of the following:

  1. Professional registration or licensure – Current registration as an Engineer Intern (EI), Engineer in Training (EIT), or licensure as a Professional Engineer (PE) by any State, the District of Columbia, Guam, or Puerto Rico. Absent other means of qualifying under this standard, those applicants who achieved such registration by means other than written test (e.g., State grandfather or eminence provisions) are eligible only for positions that are within or closely related to the specialty field of their registration. For example, an applicant who attains registration through a State Board’s eminence provision as a manufacturing engineer typically would be rated eligible only for manufacturing engineering positions.
  2. Written Test – Evidence of having successfully passed the Fundamentals of Engineering (FE) examination, or any other written test required for professional registration, by an engineering licensure board in the various States, the District of Columbia, Guam, or Puerto Rico.
  3. Specified academic courses – Successful completion of at least 60 semester hours of courses in the physical, mathematical, and engineering sciences and that included the courses specified in A above. The courses must be fully acceptable toward meeting the requirements of an engineering program.
  4. Related curriculum – Successful completion of a curriculum leading to a bachelor’s degree in an appropriate scientific field, e.g., engineering technology, physics, chemistry, architecture, computer science, mathematics, hydrology, or geology, may be accepted in lieu of a degree in engineering, provided the applicant has had at least

One year of professional engineering experience acquired under professional engineering supervision and guidance. Ordinarily there should be either an established plan of intensive training to develop professional engineering competence, or several years of prior professional engineering-type experience, e.g., in interdisciplinary positions.
pavement construction.

2) quality control/quality assurance of paving materials testing.

3) conducting inspections of airfield/roadway paving projects. This definition of specialized experience is typical of work performed at the next lower grade/level position in the federal service (GS- 12).

Job Prospects

Employment of materials engineers is projected to grow 2 percent from 2016 to 2026, slower than the average for all occupations. Materials engineers will be needed to design new materials for use both in traditional industries, such as aerospace manufacturing, and in industries focused on new medical or scientific products. However, most materials engineers work in manufacturing industries, many of which are expected to have declines or little change in employment.

Demand for materials engineers is expected to come from growing fields, such as biomedical engineering and three-dimensional printing. For example, materials engineers’ expertise is crucial in helping biomedical engineers develop new materials for medical implants.

Research and development firms will increasingly employ materials engineers as they explore new uses for materials technology in consumer products, industrial processes, and medicine.

Prospects should be best for applicants who gained experience by participating in internships or co-op programs while in college.

Computer modeling and simulations, rather than extensive and costly laboratory testing, are increasingly being used to predict the performance of new materials. Thus, those with a background in computer modeling should have better employment opportunities.

Resources

Helpful Career Planning Tools

The information provided may not cover all aspects of unique or special circumstances, federal and postal regulations, and programs are subject to change. Our articles and replies are time sensitive. Over time, various dynamic human resource guidance and factors relied upon as a basis for this article may change. The advice and strategies contained herein may not be suitable for your situation and this service is not affiliated with OPM, the postal service or any federal entity. You should consult with school counselors, hiring agency personnel offices, and human resource professionals where appropriate. Neither the publisher or author shall be liable for any loss or any other commercial damages, including but not limited to special, incidental, consequential, or other damages.

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Posted in Applying For Jobs, Federal Career Exploration, Federal Employees, Federal Jobs, Job Qualifications, Job Vacancies, Resumes / KSAs

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Posted on Sunday, 25th March 2018 by

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Federal Agencies are seeking ways to become more streamlined, efficient and effective in our new era of cyber-security. Given this, jobs are being reconstructed to satisfy the need for technology, innovation, automation and security, just to name a few key areas. The Office of Personnel Management (OPM) is offering assistance as part of this preparation with training, education and skill enhancement opportunities. Other sources such as the Federal Employee’s Career Development Center  assists management and their employees to develop viable Individual development Plans (IDPs).  This service offers individual career development assessments and guides federal employees and management through the process using their interactive Career Planning Checklist.

OPM has also crafted a new strategic plan that provides specific information on this endeavor that includes a focus on ‘soft’ skills as part of the holistic approach for employees. With numerous challenges, to include knowledge management and transfer, this assistance is critical for all agencies and particularly those facing cybersecurity objectives. OPM will work with these agencies to enhance their internal processes, procedures and policies, supplement training and provide expertise and coaching so that they can better equip themselves with the tools they need to shape a skilled and prepared workforce.

Becoming “cyber-security compliant” is a critical task moving forward for these agencies and OPM promises to do everything in their power so that their current challenges can become opportunities for growth, protection and hardened security postures.

Agencies aren’t typically experienced with looking ‘inside’ their organizations to strengthen, streamline and enhance processes, procedures and policies, particularly when it comes to employee skill development and the strategic needs of the business. That’s where the Federal Employee’s Career Development Center can help.

OPM recommends perhaps looking at work roles and billet structures as a first step; along with a strategic vision, clear goals and objectives, these work roles and billets can become the foundation for a successful mission. Pay for performance is another area where organizations can work to capitalize on knowledge, skills and abilities throughout the organization; employees are then able to be rewarded for their increased responsibilities, heightened work activities or acquisition of additional skills, training and knowledge through coursework, for example. The Federal Aviation Administration initiated a core compensation pay plan in the 1990’s that rewards employees for outstanding performance.

A sound education and training program is another element for successful skill development. Organizations must ensure they leverage flexible telework options, training courses, academic partnerships and more that foster a holistic learning environment. A variety of opportunities that include online learning, self-paced courses, briefings, and more not only bring employees together, but foster collaboration and information sharing among colleagues that will in turn, enhance organizational missions. Finally, senior leadership buy in and support are paramount when implementing a new ‘skill development’ program; employees will look to them as the pillar for the change. Mentorship, coaching and professional development programs are a must in any organization. By looking internally to determine what the key objectives for the business are, how billets and work roles are aligned and arming employees with the right tools and resources to fulfil them are a productive mix. OPM will continue to work with agencies as they are interested, to map soft skills with technical opportunities and more for a robust and solid approach to enhanced employee skill development throughout the federal community and beyond.

Reference:

Ogrysko, N. (2018, Mar 6). Retrieved from https://federalnewsradio.com/your-job/2018/03/opm-says-itll-help-agencies-re-skill-federal-employees-for-jobs-of-the-future/

Career Planning Tools

The information provided may not cover all aspects of unique or special circumstances, federal and postal regulations, and programs are subject to change. Our articles and replies are time sensitive. Over time, various dynamic human resource guidance and factors relied upon as a basis for this article may change. The advice and strategies contained herein may not be suitable for your situation and this service is not affiliated with OPM, the postal service or any federal entity. You should consult with school counselors, hiring agency personnel offices, and human resource professionals where appropriate. Neither the publisher or author shall be liable for any loss or any other commercial damages, including but not limited to special, incidental, consequential, or other damages.

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Posted in Applying For Jobs, Federal Career Exploration, Federal Employees, Federal Jobs, Job Interviews, Job Qualifications, Job Vacancies, Resumes / KSAs

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Posted on Saturday, 24th February 2018 by

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The federal government employs 3,837 public health program specialists of which 216 work overseas. The Department of Homeland Security is the largest employer with 3,591 followed by the Agency for International Development with 271.

Public health analysts may specialize in Federal public health programs, but do not usually represent those programs in dealings with non-Federal agencies and organizations. Their personal contacts are typically with people within HHS and they are primarily concerned with analyzing and evaluating the actual or potential effectiveness of current or projected public health programs in achieving objectives.

In this series public health program specialists supervise, direct, or perform work which involves providing advice and assistance to State and local governments and to various public, nonprofit, and private entities on program and administrative matters relating to the development, implementation, operation, administration, evaluation, and funding of public health activities which may be financed in whole or in part by Federal funds; or, conducting studies and performing other analytical work related to the planning, development, organization, administration, evaluation, and delivery of public health programs; or, other similar public health program work.

The job was featured by the Communicable Disease Center (CDC) and we want to briefly talk about this agency. This agency was founded in 1942 and is located in Atlanta, GA.

It is part of the Department of Health and Human Services, and is the nation’s premiere agency in promoting prevention and preparedness in the area of health.

(From the CDC website)

2017 Fast Facts

  • Headquartered in Atlanta, Georgia
  • Facilities in 10 additional locations in the U.S.
  • More than 12,000 employees in nearly 150 occupations
  • Field staff work in all 50 states, DC, Guam, Puerto Rico, the US Virgin Islands, and more than 120 countries
  • CDC’s budget in 2017: $7.2 billion

What CDC Does

  • CDC is ready 24/7 to respond to any natural or manmade event.
  • By connecting state and local health departments across the U.S., CDC can discover patterns of disease and respond when needed.
    • CDC can deliver lifesaving medicines from the Strategic National Stockpile to anywhere in the U.S. in 12 hours or less.
  • Good decision-making on health depends on the right information. CDC monitors health, informs decisionmakers, and provides people with information so they can take responsibility for their own health.
  • Local and state labs must be able to safely detect and respond to health threats in order to prevent premature death, injury, and disease. CDC trains and guides state and local public health lab partners.

CDC Saving Lives

CDC helps save lives by responding to emergencies, providing expertise, developing vaccines, and detecting disease outbreaks wherever they arise. Staff work to strengthen local and state public health departments and promote health programs that are proven to work.

CDC Protecting People

CDCs scientists collect and analyze data to determine how threats to health affect specific populations. This work protects people from hundreds of public health threats every year.

During 2015 and 2016, CDC conducted more than 750 field investigations in 49 states, 5 U.S. territories, and in at least 35 different countries. Investigations help determine what made people sick and if others have been exposed.

Government Requirements:

You must be a U.S. citizen to apply.

The yearly salary for a GS-12-14 is $75,705.00 to $150,349.00.

Typical Duties and Occupational Profile:

Medical and health services managers, also called healthcare executives or healthcare administrators, plan, direct, and coordinate medical and health services. They might manage an entire facility, a specific clinical area or department, or a medical practice for a group of physicians. Medical and health services managers must direct changes that conform to changes in healthcare laws, regulations, and technology.

Duties

Medical and health services managers typically do the following:

  • Improve efficiency and quality in delivering healthcare services
  • Develop departmental goals and objectives
  • Ensure that the facility in which they work is up to date on and compliant with laws and regulations
  • Recruit, train, and supervise staff members
  • Manage the finances of the facility, such as patient fees and billing
  • Create work schedules
  • Prepare and monitor budgets and spending to ensure departments operate within funding limits
  • Represent the facility at investor meetings or on governing boards
  • Keep and organize records of the facility’s services, such as the number of inpatient beds used
  • Communicate with members of the medical staff and department heads

Medical and health services managers work closely with physicians and surgeons, registered nurses, medical and clinical laboratory technologists and technicians, and other healthcare workers. Others may interact with patients or insurance agents.

Medical and health services managers’ titles depend on the facility or area of expertise in which they work.

The following are examples of types of medical and health services managers:

Nursing home administrators manage staff, admissions, finances, and care of the building, as well as care of the residents in nursing homes. All states require licensure for nursing home administrators; licensing requirements vary by state.

Clinical managers oversee a specific department, such as nursing, surgery, or physical therapy, and have responsibilities based on that specialty. Clinical managers set and carry out policies, goals, and procedures for their departments; evaluate the quality of the staff’s work; and develop reports and budgets.

Health information managers are responsible for the maintenance and security of all patient records and data. They must stay up to date with evolving information technology, current or proposed laws about health information systems, and trends in managing large amounts of complex data. Health information managers must ensure that databases are complete, accurate, and accessible only to authorized personnel. They also may supervise the work of medical records and health information technicians.

Medical and health services managers must effectively communicate policies and procedures with other health professionals.

Most medical and health services managers have at least a bachelor’s degree before entering the field. However, master’s degrees are common and sometimes preferred by employers. Educational requirements vary by facility and specific function.

Education

Medical and health services managers typically need at least a bachelor’s degree to enter the occupation. However, master’s degrees are common and sometimes preferred by employers. Graduate programs often last between 2 and 3 years and may include up to 1 year of supervised administrative experience in a hospital or healthcare consulting setting.

Prospective medical and health services managers typically have a degree in health administration, health management, nursing, public health administration, or business administration. Degrees that focus on both management and healthcare combine business-related courses with courses in medical terminology, hospital organization, and health information systems. For example, a degree in health administration or health information management often includes courses in health services management, accounting and budgeting, human resources administration, strategic planning, law and ethics, health economics, and health information systems.

Work Experience in a Related Occupation

Many employers require prospective medical and health services managers to have some work experience in either an administrative or a clinical role in a hospital or other healthcare facility. For example, nursing home administrators usually have years of experience working as a registered nurse.

Others may begin their careers as medical records and health information technicians, administrative assistants, or financial clerks within a healthcare office.

Important Qualities

Analytical skills. Medical and health services managers must understand and follow current regulations and adapt to new laws.

Communication skills. These managers must effectively communicate policies and procedures to other health professionals and ensure their staff’s compliance with new laws and regulations.

Detail oriented. Medical and health services managers must pay attention to detail. They might be required to organize and maintain scheduling and billing information for very large facilities, such as hospitals.

Interpersonal skills. Medical and health services managers discuss staffing problems and patient information with other professionals, such as physicians and health insurance representatives.

Leadership skills. These managers are often responsible for finding creative solutions to staffing or other administrative problems. They must hire, train, motivate, and lead staff.

Technical skills. Medical and health services managers must stay up to date with advances in healthcare technology and data analytics. For example, they may need to use coding and classification software and electronic health record (EHR) systems as their facility adopts these technologies.

Licenses, Certifications, and Registrations

All states require licensure for nursing home administrators; requirements vary by state. In most states, these administrators must have a bachelor’s degree, complete a state-approved training program, and pass a national licensing exam. Some states also require applicants to pass a state-specific exam; others may require applicants to have previous work experience in a healthcare facility. Some states also require licensure for administrators in assisted-living facilities. For information on specific state-by-state licensure requirements, visit the National Association of Long Term Care Administrator Boards.

A license is typically not required in other areas of medical and health services management. However, some positions may require applicants to have a registered nurse or social worker license.

Although certification is not required, some managers choose to become certified. Certification is available in many areas of practice. For example, the Professional Association of Health Care Office Management offers certification in medical management, the American Health Information Management Association offers health information management certification, and the American College of Health Care Administrators offers the Certified Nursing Home Administrator and Certified Assisted Living Administrator distinctions.

Advancement

Medical and health services managers advance by moving into higher paying positions with more responsibility. Some health information managers, for example, can advance to become responsible for the entire hospital’s information systems. Other managers may advance to top executive positions within the organization. Advancement to top level executive positions usually requires a master’s degree.

GS-0685-Public Health Analyst

General qualifications excerpted from Job Announcement #HHS-CDC-OM-17-1949748

Responsibilities

As a Public Health Analyst you will:

  • Serves as a special projects officer and conducts comprehensive research, review and analyses on a wide variety of public health-related programs to provide a wide variety of staff papers that address multi-functional issues.
  • Serves on review committees, study groups, public health task groups, or comparable groups delegated responsibility for reviewing and developing public health policies, procedures and guidelines.
  • Reviews and assesses the effectiveness of current public health policies and determines where new or changed policies are required to effectively execute public health programs, missions, and functions.
  • Provides executive management with recommendations to improve and/or overcome shortfalls and deficiencies and formulates alternative courses of action for the solution of complex cross cutting issues.
  • Prepares Congressional testimony, policy documents, briefings, reports, summaries, responses to requests for information, and other substantive documents.
  • Qualifications
  • MINIMUM QUALIFICATIONS:
  • GS-12:  Applicants must possess at least one year of specialized experience equivalent to at least the GS-11 grade level in the Federal Service.  Specialized experience is experience which is directly related to the position which has equipped the applicant with the particular knowledge, skills and abilities (KSAs) to successfully perform the duties of the position to include experience providing assistance in evaluating and analyzing public health program operations (examples:  HIV/AIDS, TB, infectious diseases, and immunization).
  • GS-13:  Applicants must possess at least one year of specialized experience equivalent to at least the GS-12 grade level in the Federal Service.  Specialized experience is experience which is directly related to the position which has equipped the applicant with the particular knowledge, skills and abilities (KSAs) to successfully perform the duties of the position to include experience independently evaluating and analyzing public health program operations (examples: HIV/AIDS, TB, infectious diseases, and immunization).
  • GS-14:  Applicants must possess at least one year of specialized experience equivalent to at least the GS-13 grade level in the Federal Service.  Specialized experience is experience which is directly related to the position which has equipped the applicant with the particular knowledge, skills and abilities (KSAs) to successfully perform the duties of the position to include experience evaluating and analyzing public health program operations (examples: HIV/AIDS, TB, infectious diseases, and immunization) to include advising management on implementation and improvement initiatives.

Job Prospects (Excerpted from Occupational Handbook (OOH) published by the Department of Labor)

Job prospects for medical and health services managers are likely to be favorable. In addition to rising employment demand, the need to replace managers who retire over the next decade will result in some openings. Candidates with a master’s degree in health administration or a related field, as well as knowledge of healthcare IT systems, will likely have the best prospects.

Resources

Helpful Career Planning Tools

The information provided may not cover all aspects of unique or special circumstances, federal and postal regulations, and programs are subject to change. Our articles and replies are time sensitive. Over time, various dynamic human resource guidance and factors relied upon as a basis for this article may change. The advice and strategies contained herein may not be suitable for your situation and this service is not affiliated with OPM, the postal service or any federal entity. You should consult with school counselors, hiring agency personnel offices, and human resource professionals where appropriate. Neither the publisher or author shall be liable for any loss or any other commercial damages, including but not limited to special, incidental, consequential, or other damages.

Posted in Applying For Jobs, Civil Service Tests, Federal Career Exploration, Federal Employees, Federal Jobs, Job Interviews, Job Qualifications, Job Vacancies, Overseas Jobs

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Posted on Saturday, 10th February 2018 by

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COBRA. Medical. Dental. Home. Automobile. Life. Long Term Disability.

While insurance matters are important for all workers, they are critical for mid-career workers who have been fired or laid off. All let go workers must address insurance maters as soon as practicable. Life goes on after you lose your job, and so do the risks that you face every day. Adverse events never get laid off or take a vacation. Many workers think insurance matters are boring but when it comes to reducing risk, which is what insurance does, boring matters become important. In today’s world insurance has become a necessity along with food, shelter and clothing.

We live in a risky world. On any given day one could contract a life threatening disease like cancer, suffer a long-term debilitating and costly illness like Lyme’s Disease, or have a car accident resulting in serious personal injury and substantial property damage. Your living space, your house or apartment, is at risk, too. A hidden electrical malfunction could burn your dwelling to the ground and destroy all of your personal possessions in the process. Risk is omnipresent and insurance is the best way to hedge against it.

Every person, regardless of social status or employment status, needs the protection that insurance offers. The most important types of insurance are: medical, dental, life, long term disability, automobile and homeowners. Health problems rank at the top of our risk ladder, and every let go worker must hedge against them. We’ll examine each type of insurance beginning with the medical insurance option known as COBRA.

THE CONSOLIDATED OMNIBUS BUDGET RECONCILIATION ACT. COBRA

COBRA is a federal government program that enables workers to continue their medical insurance coverage after being let go. However, there are strict rules governing its implementation. For example, workers who are fired for gross misconduct are not eligible. Also, companies that employ fewer than twenty workers cannot participate in the plan.

While COBRA is a helpful risk-lowering federal government medical insurance plan, you must pay the entire cost of the plan plus an administrative fee when you are laid off. If your company group medical insurance premium was $5,000 and split between you and your employer, now you are responsible for paying the entire premium plus the 2 percent administrative fee. Generally, you must apply for COBRA benefits within sixty days after being separated. Benefits last for 18 months and will cover you, your spouse and children. However, as with all government programs, the rules and regulations are constantly changing so act immediately if you elect to choose COBRA benefits. For current rules and regulations regarding COBA, speak with your former employer’s human resources director and review the Department of Labor website, www.dol.gov.

Caution! Do not assume that you will find another job with medical insurance benefits and pass up the chance to use COBRA. Your period of unemployment could go on for six months or more and you cannot be without medical insurance for that long a period.

THE AFFORDABLE CARE ACT (OBAMACARE)

The Affordable Care Act (ACA) provides an array of choices for individuals seeking medical insurance. Your options are contingent upon your income and state of residence. This controversial government program is highly political and subject to modification at any time.

Cost is critical when assessing what to do about medical insurance after leaving the company. Learn what a medical insurance policy offered through the ACA insurance exchanges would cost and compare it with the cost of the insurance policy offered by COBRA. For information and updates on the Affordable Care Act in your State go to this website: www.healthcare.gov.

DENTAL INSURANCE

I speak from personal experience on this matter. One fine day I was talking an early morning bike ride when I unexpectedly hit a patch of damp road. Down I went striking my face on the pavement. The result? Two front teeth were cracked beyond repair and had to be replaced with dental implants. The cost? $5,000….and I had no dental insurance.

Dental problems can arise without notice on any given day. We are always at risk for infections that require costly root canals, and for teeth damaged by accidents. For a realistic account of what can happen unexpectedly, talk with your dentist.

If you had dental coverage in your last job, by all means try to extend coverage while you are out of work. If you did not have it, go online and look for reasonably priced dental insurance. Most dental plans are limited to group coverage through an employer, but there are a handful of dental insurance companies offering individual plans. Delta Dental is one of them. It offers individual plans and is noted for its generous coverage at modest cost. Check it out at www.deltadental.com. Another reputable insurer offering individual dental insurance is MetLife, a multiline insurer that has been in business since 1868. Their website is www.metlife.com.

HOMEOWNERS INSURANCE

When out of work, many workers try to minimize expenses by cutting insurance coverage on their homes or apartments. They say, “It will never happen to me. I’ll cut my coverage while unemployed and pick it up after I get another job.” Don’t buy into that narrative. Homeowners carrying a mortgage do not have a choice because the mortgager requires coverage and in most cases it is factored into the monthly mortgage payment. However, if you own property outright or live in an apartment, coverage is optional. Do not eliminate this coverage. On any given day your residence could burn to the ground and take all of your belongings with it. On another given day, someone could trip over a rug in your apartment, fall, and incur serious personal injury. You will be responsible for payment of all medical expenses and possibly be sued for negligence. Homeowners insurance may seem to be an option when you are out of work but it is not. It is a necessity in today’s world.

AUTOMOBILE INSURANCE

Automobile insurance is required if your car is financed and the premium is usually built into your monthly payment. In all States, proof of financial responsibility, i.e. automobile insurance, is required. You must present proof of coverage when you apply for or renew your license plates every year. Do not even think about skirting the rules and discontinuing premium payments after you receive your state license believing that you will never get into an accident if you drive extra carefully. Once again, risk is with you 24/7. Automobile insurance is a necessity.

Many workers try to reduce their premiums by signing on for the minimum required coverage but this is a grave mistake. Your personal injury liability coverage should be nothing less than one million dollars per accident, and property damage should be five hundred thousand dollars for each accident. In addition, coverage should include medical payments which will pay for medical bills for all passengers riding in your car who might be injured in a collision. For an extra ounce of protection, include uninsured motorist coverage because there are drivers on the road with no coverage whatsoever. Listen to the advice of your auto insurance agent and proceed accordingly.

LIFE INSURANCE

“Why life insurance?” you might ask. “I’m in the prime of my life and I’m not going to die in the foreseeable future.” Think again. Your life could end at any time during the day or night, regardless of your age, leaving your dependents or extended family with expenses that could reach beyond their means. Burial expenses come to mind. Today, the average cost of your funeral, including the cemetery grave plot and head stone, is $13,000, sometimes more depending on location. Add some upgrades like a fancy coffin and elaborate headstone and the cost of your good- bye will run over $15,000. The following story illustrates how risky life is.

Sandra’s Story

I recruited Sandra for a job as a Reading Consultant with an educational publisher where I was Regional Sales Manager for the Midwestern United States. Sandra excelled in her job and was sought after by school districts implementing their new Reading programs.

She belonged to a number of fine and preforming arts organizations in Chicago. She was an officer in the Junior League and performed volunteer work for the Art Institute. Her teen age daughter was the pride and joy of her life and attended only the best schools.

As Sandra entered mid-career, she and her husband frequently took skiing trips to Aspen and Vail in addition to vacations in Europe and the Caribbean. Life was good for Sandra. In February 2015, they went on a five day ski trip to Vail Colorado and returned home tired and happy. However, Sandra seemed more tired than usual after five days on the slopes and scheduled an appointment with her doctor to see is she needed a dose of vitamins to keep up her energy level. As a precaution, her doctor ordered lab tests and an abdominal CT scan. He called them, “routine.” However, the “routine” tests indicated that Sandra had pancreatic cancer. Surgery followed and so did death, seven weeks after diagnosis. Sandra possessed intelligence, energy and passion beyond the ordinary, but death does not play favorites. To this day, she is missed by her family, husband, daughter, friends and former coworkers. They still ask, “How could she have died in the prime of her life…without forewarning?” Rest in peace, Sandra.

There are several types of life insurance. The most common, and the lowest in price, is called “term life insurance,” which is what most employers provide for their employees. It terminates as soon as you are fired or laid off. When you walk out the door after being let go, you are no longer insured. Purchasing term life insurance should be a priority for all let go workers. It is readily available from any number of life insurance companies at reasonable cost. Conduct an online search for low cost term life insurance and purchase it immediately. Dying is not cheap. Death never takes a vacation. Plan accordingly. Buy life insurance….now.

LONG TERM DISABILITY INSURANCE (LTD)

The story goes something like this. “I don’t need LTD insurance because a disabling accident will never happen to me.” Most of us delude ourselves into thinking that accidents resulting in long term or permanent disability always happen to the other guy. I fell into this trap in mid-career, too, and but for the guidance of an extraordinary insurance saleswoman I would not have survived financially. Here’s my story.

Chicken Man

It was a beautiful early autumn morning and I was riding my bike through a rural area in suburban Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. The area was dotted with small farms, some of which raised chickens. While riding past a farmhouse with chicken coops nearly reaching the road, a chicken darted from weeds growing along the shoulder of the road and ran into the front wheel of my bike. I had no time to outmaneuver this fast moving beast and down I went. I suffered a fractured pelvis, a torn rotator cuff, a concussion (despite wearing a helmet), and multiple lacerations, contusions and abrasions. I was disabled for six months following fourteen days in the hospital, surgery, and intensive physical therapy. During that time, I had no income or disability payments from my employer. The expenses, however, continued as usual. I was responsible for home mortgage payments, car payments, insurance payments, food, clothing, medicine, college tuition bills for three children and so on.

I would have defaulted on the mortgage, car loan and tuition payments but for a long-term disability insurance policy that I had purchased from Northwestern Mutual Insurance Co. and which had become effective only three days before the accident. That policy covered almost one hundred percent of my expenses during my disability. Without it, I could not have survived financially. Here’s the rest of the story.

Joanne, my insurance agent who sold me life insurance and homeowners insurance, had been after me for months to buy a long-term disability insurance policy because my employer did not provide one. I told her that I was in good health and that I did not participate in risky pursuits like mountain climbing or sky diving so my needing long-term disability insurance was minimal. “Wrong.” she said. “On any given day, you could be hit by a truck and become incapacitated for the rest of your life. Long-term disability is more important than life insurance for individuals with family responsibilities. Chances of incurring long term disability for a middle age person are much greater than dying.” I refused to listen to Joanne but she kept after me until in a moment of frustration I said, “Okay, Joanne. Get off my case! Write up the policy and don’t bug me anymore.” She did just that and three days later, I was hit, not by the proverbial truck, but by the chicken. Thanks, Joanne, for taking time to educate me about the risks we face every day.

Many insurers provide LTD coverage but most are for group plans through employers. Two reputable companies that provide individual LTD insurance are Northwestern Mutual, www.northwesternmutual.com and Unum, www.unum.com. Go online and check out their LTD options and prices.

MOVING FORWARD

Most people consider insurance a boring topic, one to be relegated to last place in the broad scheme of things. The unexpected illness or accident always happens to someone else. Don’t fool yourself. Consider the insurances detailed above as much a necessity as food, shelter and clothing. In today’s world you cannot live without it. Reduce your risk and implement these action items regarding insurance.

  • Apply for COBRA medical insurance immediately after being separated from your employer.
  • Consider an Affordable Care Act (ACA) policy or a private medical insurance policy as an alternative to COBRA.
  • Purchase LTD, auto, homeowners and life insurance….now. All are equally important for mid-career workers. According to the National Highway Traffic Administration, an automobile accident occurs every 60 seconds. And, reliable sources tell us that most accidents resulting in personal injury occur in or near your home.

PRINT AND DIGITAL RESOURCES

For detailed information on COBRA. www.COBRAinsurance.com
For information about the costs associated with your funeral. www.Parting.com
For information about funeral insurance. www.funeralwise.com/plan/costs
For information about disability insurance policies. www.insure.com/disability-insurance
For information and updates about the Affordable Care Act. www.healthcare.gov.

For more information about managing your personal finances after being fired or laid off, read my book, Moving Forward in Mid-Career, A Guide to Rebuilding Your Career after Being Fired or Laid Off, c2018, Skyhorse Publishing Inc. Enter this link for purchasing sources. http://skyhorsepublishing.com/titles/12831-9781510722019-moving-forward-in-mid-career.

John Henry Weiss
Author

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The information provided may not cover all aspects of unique or special circumstances, federal and postal regulations, and programs are subject to change. Our articles and replies are time sensitive. Over time, various dynamic human resource guidance and factors relied upon as a basis for this article may change. The advice and strategies contained herein may not be suitable for your situation and this service is not affiliated with OPM, the postal service or any federal entity. You should consult with school counselors, hiring agency personnel offices, and human resource professionals where appropriate. Neither the publisher or author shall be liable for any loss or any other commercial damages, including but not limited to special, incidental, consequential, or other damages.

Posted in Federal Employees, Uncategorized

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Posted on Wednesday, 7th February 2018 by

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When Congress can’t agree on a budget, government shutdowns are likely to occur. So what does a shutdown mean for many of us – social security checks (thankfully) are not impacted and our military folks and troops will remain at their posts. Additionally, the medical industry – doctors, nurses and hospitals will continue to receive Medicaid and Medicare payments and other ‘essential’ workers like our Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), Transportation Security Administration and Border Patrol Agents will stay on the job. However, hundreds of thousands of federal workers will not be going to work; so what about the museums, parks, zoos, and the like that the public enjoy? If Congress can’t reach an agreement we will ‘all’ feel the impact in one form or fashion in our personal or professional lives, or both.

For those federal workers that are furloughed, back pay is provided for as long as the government is closed; however, this is not a guarantee. Although lawmakers pass legislation to ensure compensation for federal workers during a lapse in appropriations, there is always ‘chatter’ of its uncertainty, particularly given a new administration. For those essential employees (performing emergency work involving the safety of human life or protection of property), they will be ‘excepted’ from such a shutdown furlough and expected to work. Political appointees are part of the Title 5 leave system, and therefore, not subject to furloughs so they will work during a shutdown as well. Each agency decides how to notify their employees as well as determine their status – whether excepted or not.

Health benefits continue to be provided to federal employees during a shutdown, per OPM. Federal Employees enrolled in a Group Life Insurance program (FEGLI) will receive coverage for 12 months without any additional costs to the employee or agency. Likewise, the Long Term Care Insurance Program that some federal workers have will continue with covered premiums, but automatic payroll deductions will cease during a furlough for participating employees. Federal Employees Retirement (FERS) and Civil Service Retirement (CSRS) individuals will continue to receive annuity payments and the Thrift Savings Plan (TSP) will operate normally given a shutdown; however, furloughed employees that are TSP enrollees will be unable to make contributions but they can still request a financial hardship withdrawal.

So, there is the good, the bad and the ugly in all of this, but how much does a shutdown really cost? In 2013, for example, a 16 day shutdown cost the government over $2.5 billion in lost productivity. Also, the numerous financial impacts surrounding those losses associated with National Park and Museum fees are extensive. Finally, contracts, stop work orders and temporary layoffs throughout the federal community are plentiful during a furlough since these operations are usually suspended.

For more information on Furloughs, their impact, and the current status of the latest Continuing Resolutions, read Federal News radio’s article titled “Here is How a Shutdown Affects Your Pay and Benefits.”

Career Planning Tools

The information provided may not cover all aspects of unique or special circumstances, federal and postal regulations, and programs are subject to change. Our articles and replies are time sensitive. Over time, various dynamic human resource guidance and factors relied upon as a basis for this article may change. The advice and strategies contained herein may not be suitable for your situation and this service is not affiliated with OPM, the postal service or any federal entity. You should consult with school counselors, hiring agency personnel offices, and human resource professionals where appropriate. Neither the publisher or author shall be liable for any loss or any other commercial damages, including but not limited to special, incidental, consequential, or other damages.

Posted in Federal Career Exploration, Federal Employees, Federal Jobs

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Posted on Friday, 19th January 2018 by

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Working as a Financial Manager (GS-0510) with the Federal Government

The federal government employs 13,078 in this occupation of which 79 work overseas. The DOD is the largest employer of this series with 2,409 accountants, the VA employs 775 and the  Department of the Army employs 1,067 civilians in this category. This series is used in all cabinet level departments, most large agencies and many small agencies.

This series covers positions that advise on or administer, supervise, or perform professional accounting work that requires application of accounting theories, concepts, principles, and standards to the financial activities of governmental, quasi-governmental, or private sector organizations. The work includes:

  • series covers positions that advise on or administer, supervise, or perform professional accounting work that requires application of accounting theories, concepts, principles, and standards to the financial activities of governmental, quasi-governmental, or private sector organizations. The work includes designing, developing, operating, or inspecting accounting systems;
  • prescribing accounting standards, policies, and requirements;
  • examining, analyzing, and interpreting accounting data, records, and reports; or
  • advising or assisting management on accounting and financial management matters.

Accounting theories, concepts, principles and standards address these types of duties:

  • determining the boundaries of an accounting entity;
  • recognizing and measuring revenues;
  • matching revenues and expenses by applying methodologies such as accrual accounting and depreciation;
  • defining and measuring costs by applying methodologies such as standard, process, job-order, and activity-based costing; and, full disclosure on financial statements.

Government Requirements:

  • You must be a U.S. citizen to apply
  • The yearly salary for a GS-7 to 9 is $35,359 to $81,541 per year

Typical Duties & Occupational Profile:

Financial Managers perform data analysis and advise senior managers on profit-maximizing ideas.  Financial managers are responsible for the financial health of an organization. They produce financial reports, direct investment activities, and develop strategies and plans for the long-term financial goals of their organization.

Duties

Financial managers typically do the following:

  • Prepare financial statements, business activity reports, and forecasts
  • Monitor financial details to ensure that legal requirements are met
  • Supervise employees who do financial reporting and budgeting
  • Review company financial reports and seek ways to reduce costs
  • Analyze market trends to maximize profits and find expansion opportunities
  • Help management make financial decisions
  • The role of the financial manager, particularly in business, is changing in response to technological advances that have substantially reduced the amount of time it takes to produce financial reports. Financial managers’ main responsibility used to be monitoring a company’s finances, but they now do more data analysis and advise senior managers on ways to maximize profits. They often work on teams, acting as business advisors to top executives.
  • Financial managers also do tasks that are specific to their organization or industry. For example, government financial managers must be experts on government appropriations and budgeting processes, and healthcare financial managers must know about topics in healthcare finance. Moreover, financial managers must be knowledgeable about special tax laws and regulations that affect their industry.

The role of the financial manager, particularly in business, is changing in response to technological advances that have substantially reduced the amount of time it takes to produce financial reports. Financial managers’ main responsibility used to be monitoring a company’s finances, but they now do more data analysis and advise senior managers on ways to maximize profits. They often work on teams, acting as business advisors to top executives.

Financial managers also do tasks that are specific to their organization or industry. For example, government financial managers must be experts on government appropriations and budgeting processes, and healthcare financial managers must know about topics in healthcare finance. Moreover, financial managers must be knowledgeable about special tax laws and regulations that affect their industry.

The following are examples of types of financial managers:

Controllers direct the preparation of financial reports that summarize and forecast the organization’s financial position, such as income statements, balance sheets, and analyses of future earnings or expenses. Controllers also are in charge of preparing special reports required by governmental agencies that regulate businesses. Often, controllers oversee the accounting, audit, and budget departments of their organization.

Treasurers and finance officers direct their organization’s budgets to meet its financial goals. They oversee the investment of funds and carry out strategies to raise capital (such as issuing stocks or bonds) to support the firm’s expansion. They also develop financial plans for mergers (two companies joining together) and acquisitions (one company buying another).

Credit managers oversee their firm’s credit business. They set credit-rating criteria, determine credit ceilings, and monitor the collections of past-due accounts.

Cash managers monitor and control the flow of cash in and out of the company to meet business and investment needs. For example, they must project cash flow to determine whether the company will have a shortage or surplus of cash.

Risk managers control financial risk by using strategies to limit or offset the probability of a financial loss or a company’s exposure to financial uncertainty. Among the risks they try to limit are those that stem from currency or commodity price changes.

Insurance managers decide how best to limit a company’s losses by obtaining insurance against risks, such as the need to make disability payments for an employee who gets hurt on the job or the costs imposed by a lawsuit against the company.

Education

A bachelor’s degree in finance, accounting, economics, or business administration is often the minimum education needed for financial managers. However, many employers now seek candidates with a master’s degree, preferably in business administration, finance, accounting, or economics. These academic programs help students develop analytical skills and learn financial analysis methods and software.

Licenses, Certifications, and Registrations

Although professional certification is not required, some financial managers still get it to demonstrate a level of competence. The CFA Institute confers the Chartered Financial Analyst (CFA) certification to investment professionals who have at least a bachelor’s degree, 4 years of work experience, and pass three exams. The Association for Financial Professionals confers the Certified Treasury Professional credential to those who pass an exam and have a minimum of 2 years of relevant experience. Certified public accountants (CPA’s) are licensed by their state’s board of accountancy and must pass an exam administered by the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants (AICPA).

Work Experience in a Related Occupation

Financial managers usually have experience in another business or financial occupation. For example, they may have worked as a loan officer, accountant, securities sales agent, or financial analyst.

In some cases, companies provide formal management training programs to help prepare highly motivated and skilled financial workers to become financial managers.

Advancement

Experienced financial managers can advance to become chief financial officers (CFOs). These executives are responsible for the accuracy of an entire company’s or organization’s financial reporting.

Important Qualities

Analytical skills. Financial managers increasingly are assisting executives in making decisions that affect their organization, a task that requires analytical ability.

Communication skills. Excellent communication skills are essential because financial managers must explain and justify complex financial transactions.

Detail oriented. In preparing and analyzing reports such as balance sheets and income statements, financial managers must be precise and attentive to their work in order to avoid errors.

Math skills. Financial managers must be skilled in math, including algebra. An understanding of international finance and complex financial documents also is important.

Organizational skills. Because financial managers deal with a range of information and documents, they must stay organized to do their jobs effectively.

(Some of the above information was excerpted from the Bureau of Labor ooh.gov website)

GS-0510-Financial Management Analyst/Accountant/Auditor 
General qualifications excerpted from job Announcement # DE-10047630-17-SMS.

Duties

The selectee for this position will serve as a Financial Management Trainee with the Financial Management Career Program (FMCP).

The Financial Management Trainee Program (FMTP) is a 24-month training program for entry-level financial managers referred to as “Trainees.” To qualify for this program, you must have earned a qualifying bachelor’s degree within the past two years. Recent college graduates are hired by the FMCP for the DON as entry-level (GS-7/9/11) financial management analysts, accountants, and auditors (job series 501, 510, and 511, respectively). Trainees are officially assigned to the FMCP but are stationed at various Navy and Marine Corps activities, referred to as “Homeports,” throughout the DON. Following successful completion of their 24-month training program, Trainees graduate from the program and are considered for placement in suitable positions at their Homeports.

“The Financial Management Associate Program (FMAP) is a 24-month program for mid-level financial management personnel referred to as “Associates.” To qualify for this program, you must have earned a qualifying master’s degree within the past two years. Recent college graduates with relevant financial management analyst experience are hired by the FMCP as DON mid-level (GS-9/11/12) Financial Management Analysts, Accountants, and Auditors (job series 501, 510, and 511 respectively). Associates are officially assigned to the FMCP but are stationed at various Navy and Marine Corps activities, referred to as “Homeports.” Following successful completion of their 24-month program, FMAP Associates graduate from the program and are considered for placement in suitable positions at their Homeports”.
This is a Financial Management Level I certified position per the National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) 2012, Section 1599d. This certification level must be achieved within prescribed timelines. Certification requirements are outlined in the DoD Instruction 1300.26.

Qualifications

The Direct Hire Authority for Financial Management Experts in the Department of Defense is used to appoint qualified candidates who possess a finance, accounting, management, or actuarial science degree, other related degree, or equivalent experience, to certain positions within the competitive service

Applicants applying to the Accountant or Auditor positions must meet the following basic education requirement:

Degree: accounting; or a degree in a related field such as business administration, finance, or public administration that included or was supplemented by 24 semester hours in accounting. The 24 hours may include up to 6 hours of credit in business law. Combination of education and experience: at least 4 years of experience in accounting, or an equivalent combination of accounting experience, college-level education, and training that provided professional accounting knowledge. The applicant’s background must also include one of the following:

1)Twenty-four semester hours in accounting or auditing courses of appropriate type and quality. This can include up to 6 hours of business law;

2) A certificate as Certified Public Accountant or a Certified Internal Auditor, obtained through written examination.

3) Completion of the requirements for a degree that included substantial course work in accounting or auditing, e.g., 15 semester hours, but that does not fully satisfy the 24-semester-hour requirement of paragraph A.

(a) the applicant has successfully worked at the full-performance level in accounting, auditing, or a related field, e.g., valuation engineering or financial institution examining;

(b) a panel of at least two higher level professional accountants or auditors has determined that the applicant has demonstrated a good knowledge of accounting and of related and underlying fields that equals in breadth, depth, currency, and level of advancement that which is normally associated with successful completion of the 4-year course of study described in paragraph A.

(c) except for literal nonconformance to the requirement

of 24 semester hours in accounting, the applicant’s education, training, and experience fully meet the specified requirements.

Additional information

This position is covered by the Department of Defense Priority Placement Program.

This position has promotion potential to the GS-11 (Trainee Program) or GS-12 (Associate Program) grade. If selected below the full performance level, incumbent may be noncompetitively promoted to the next higher grade level after meeting all regulatory requirements, and upon the recommendation of management. Promotion is neither implied nor guaranteed

Job Prospects (Excerpted from Occupational Handbook (OOH) published by the Department of Labor)

Employment of financial managers is projected to grow 19 percent from 2016 to 2026, much faster than the average for all occupations. However, growth will vary by industry.

Services provided by financial managers, such as planning, directing, and coordinating investments, are likely to stay in demand as the economy grows. In addition, several specialties within financial management, particularly cash management and risk management, are expected to be in high demand over the next decade.

In recent years, companies have accumulated more cash on their balance sheets, particularly among those with operations in foreign countries. As globalization continues, this trend is likely to persist. This should lead to demand for financial managers as companies will be in need of cash management expertise.

There has been an increased emphasis on risk management within the financial industry, and this trend is expected to continue. In response to both the financial crisis and financial regulatory reform, banking institutions will place a greater emphasis on stability and managing risk rather than on maximizing profits. This is expected to lead to employment growth for risk managers.

The depository credit intermediation industry (which includes commercial and savings banks) employs a large percentage of financial managers. As bank customers increasingly conduct transactions online, the number of bank branches is expected to decline, which should limit employment growth in this sector. However, employment declines are expected to mainly affect clerical occupations, such as tellers, rather than financial managers. From 2016 to 2026, employment of financial managers is projected to grow 14 percent in this industry.

As with other managerial occupations, jobseekers are likely to face competition because there are more applicants than job openings. Candidates with expertise in accounting and finance—particularly those with a master’s degree or certification—should enjoy the best job prospects.

Resources

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The information provided may not cover all aspects of unique or special circumstances, federal and postal regulations, and programs are subject to change. Our articles and replies are time sensitive. Over time, various dynamic human resource guidance and factors relied upon as a basis for this article may change. The advice and strategies contained herein may not be suitable for your situation and this service is not affiliated with OPM, the postal service or any federal entity. You should consult with school counselors, hiring agency personnel offices, and human resource professionals where appropriate. Neither the publisher or author shall be liable for any loss or any other commercial damages, including but not limited to special, incidental, consequential, or other damages.

Posted in Applying For Jobs, Civil Service Tests, Federal Career Exploration, Federal Employees, Federal Jobs, Job Interviews, Job Qualifications, Job Vacancies, Overseas Jobs

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Posted on Wednesday, 10th January 2018 by

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Would you like the opportunity to avoid traffic, decrease your commuting costs and work from home? Then perhaps telework is for you!  Telework enables employees, like yourself, to work from home, or at a remote center one or more days per week. You will utilize phones, fax, computers, modems, teleconferencing, emails and more, in order to complete your  normal duties at your home or remote location. With a flexible arrangement and supervisory approval, an agreement can be formulated between you and your supervisor outlining tasks, meeting attendance, goals and objectives and more.

The beauty of telework is that with its flexibility, you can tailor it to you/your organization’s needs to ensure it is a win-win for both parties. Performance can be measured through completed assignments, milestones, meeting participation, and goals and objectives, etc. Telework can reduce stress, increase productivity and foster a more rewarding work-life balance; try it…you’ll be glad you did!

According to telework.gov, “Telework is a work arrangement that allows an employee to perform work, during any part of regular, paid hours, at an approved alternative worksite (e.g., home, telework center).  At its core, telework is people doing their work at locations different from where they would normally be doing it.”

Review available telework options and resources for both employers and employees who are currently engaged in, or interested in pursuing telework as a flexible opportunity. In order to balance individual and mission needs and requirements, OPM provides a wealth of telework information on https://www.telework.gov/ that is searchable, current, and detailed. Individuals can obtain a variety of data; specifically, there are updated reports, like the 2017 Status of Telework in the Federal Government Report, which offers an overview of Federal telework programs and provides updates on the continued telework progress within the Federal Government. Also, organizations like OPM, GSA, GAO and others provide reporting and analysis as part of a comprehensive telework portfolio.

There is an external link for teleworking and dependent care guidance provided by Human Resource Directors with a focus on the ability to telework as a flexible opportunity for those caring for others, such as children or adult dependents. Telework can provide these individuals with the ability for them to respond to critical health, well-being and/or daily living activities for their loved ones, while meeting mission requirements and individual work needs. The Telework Enhancement Act link on the site provides information specific to employees with disabilities who wish to telework; both from an employer and employee perspective.

OPM’s site even provides a sample “request” for telework for those employees seeking this opportunity with their employers. Since managerial approval is a requirement, a brief, written proposal can provide a business case for telework if done correctly. The proposal should include an explanation of why you want to telework, the benefits to the organization and yourself, and specific job responsibilities that will be performed while on telework. Additionally, skills, knowledge and abilities should be discussed that will support independence, good communication, as well as organization and planning. Along with an explanation of the home office or environment describing where and how the work will be performed, equipment should also be addressed. A clear, flexible schedule with milestones and deadlines will round out the request and show initiative; perhaps offering a trial period (one day a pay period) to start will offer an opportunity for your employer to “evaluate” the arrangement before agreeing to a commitment.

Best practices for agencies along with a myriad of success stories throughout the federal government and private sectors offer insight into impact, cost savings, retention and more. A variety of guidance and legislation involving telework is also provided on OPM’s telework site  to include: pay and leave, performance management, security and IT, agency roles and more.

Finally, federal resources such as announcements, training courses, samples, newsletters and articles serve as reference tools and working aids for those interested in participating in telework, and for those who want to expand upon their original success with this option. Recommendations on work schedules, performance management documentation as well as communication options are discussed on the site as part of a holistic and successful telework program. Training programs, coursework, webcasts and more round out the network of resources provided in this one location.

References

Career Planning Tools 

The information provided may not cover all aspects of unique or special circumstances, federal and postal regulations, and programs are subject to change. Our articles and replies are time sensitive. Over time, various dynamic human resource guidance and factors relied upon as a basis for this article may change. The advice and strategies contained herein may not be suitable for your situation and this service is not affiliated with OPM, the postal service or any federal entity. You should consult with school counselors, hiring agency personnel offices, and human resource professionals where appropriate. Neither the publisher or author shall be liable for any loss or any other commercial damages, including but not limited to special, incidental, consequential, or other damages.

Posted in Federal Career Exploration, Federal Employees, Federal Jobs

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Posted on Thursday, 28th December 2017 by

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The President signed an Executive Order to implement the January 2018 pay adjustments and the new pay charts were released this week.  The Executive Order authorized a 1.4 percent across-the-board increase for statutory pay systems and locality pay increases costing approximately 0.5 percent of basic payroll, reflecting an overall average pay increase of 1.9 percent. The actual pay will vary according to which locality pay area he or she is assigned.

Locality pay adjustments are designed to level the playing field for federal employees working in different major metropolitan areas. The 47 locality area salaries are adjusted by comparing General Schedule and non-Federal pay in each locality pay area, based on salary surveys conducted by the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

The following 47 locality area charts are now available, click on the one for your area to see the new 2018 federal GS pay charts. You will also find rates for all other groups including, wage grade occupations, special compensation systems, and physician’s comparability allowances.

Locality Pay Chart List

Helpful Career Planning Tools

The information provided may not cover all aspects of unique or special circumstances, federal and postal regulations, and programs are subject to change. Our articles and replies are time sensitive. Over time, various dynamic human resource guidance and factors relied upon as a basis for this article may change. The advice and strategies contained herein may not be suitable for your situation and this service is not affiliated with OPM, the postal service or any federal entity. You should consult with school counselors, hiring agency personnel offices, and human resource professionals where appropriate. Neither the publisher or author shall be liable for any loss or any other commercial damages, including but not limited to special, incidental, consequential, or other damages.

 

Posted in Applying For Jobs, Federal Career Exploration, Federal Employees, Federal Jobs

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